WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


March 2013

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Beginning 1 April, newspapers in Myanmar will be able to publish daily, the first time since 1964. Previously, state-owned newspapers were the only dailies allowed to print. Decades-long restrictions on private papers were put in place by a junta regime to rule out any public dissent.

The news was first announced in September and is one of the many reforms under President Thein Sein, elected in 2011. The government ended media censorship in August and soon followed by announcing that daily newspapers would be allowed in April. Censorship was applied to everything from newspapers to song lyrics and even fairy tales.

Journalists in Burma were some of the most restricted in the world, subjected to routine state surveillance, phone taps, imprisonment and censorship so intense that independent papers could not publish on a daily basis. Even photos of Aung San Suu Kyi were barred.

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi announced that her newspaper is one of many publications planning to run daily. Suu Kyi’s paper, the D-Wave, is currently published weekly and focuses on the National Democratic League’s activities.  

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-26 15:21

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The paper is in a state of flux as The New York Times Company announced last month that it is selling the paper. There are no buyers as of yet.

“We don't know what the future holds. We know there's a lot of interest from the community. There's been interest locally, and from New York,” said McGrory on Thursday.

Before being appointed editor in December, McGrory was a columnist and former metro editor for the Globe.

McGrory said the problem for newspapers lies in the decrease in revenue from classified ads. He said The Globe once made $160-180 million a year on ads, but is now losing to sites like Monster.com and Craigslist. It launched a paywall in 2011 and now has about 28,000 paid digital subscribers.

Globe spokesperson Ellen Clegg told Dan Kennedy of The Neiman Lab, “We have been trying to find the right balance between the free-sharing culture of the Internet and paid access to premium Globe content.”

However, according to McGrory the Globe and the city of Boston are seeing growth. McGrory hopes the paper will mirror Boston’s changes.

 "I aim to make the sure the Globe captures the moment for what it is and helps spread this prosperity to places where it doesn't normally go."

He sites the paper’s investigative or “accountability” reporting as a key point in the paper’s success, some of which include: 

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Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-25 13:50

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Professor Steve Doig, the Knight Chair in Journalism at the Walter Chronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications in Arizona, promotes an unfussy approach to data journalism where simple excel spreadsheet skills and knowledge of how to find and access data, and a journalist’s inquisitiveness are foundations of success.

“Data journalism lets you go beyond the anecdote,” he told a meeting of French newspaper editors in Paris last week. “It lets you step back and look at the larger view, and then put the evidence in. You still need anecdotes to tell the story.”

Doig divides data journalism skill sets into two camps. Those who can take data, look at patterns and find the story and then those who can take those results and make them ready for presentation. There are only a few wizards who can do both tasks effectively.

His toolbox has five items: a web browser, ability to access public records, Excel, in rare cases a heavier programme such as Microsoft Access to bring different tables together and a geo mapping tool.

Equipping editors with the right skills to build and manage data journalism teams is the subject of a special Editors Masterclass on the Newsroom Data Revolution being held on the eve of the World Editors Forum in Bangkok on June 2.

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Author

Cherilyn Ireton

Date

2013-03-25 12:41

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In his new book Fighting For The Press, author James Goodale, former chief counsel for The New York Times during the Pentagon Papers trial, looks back on the occasion of the trial's 40th anniversary at the press freedom issues that still exist in the US today.

In an interview with the Columbia Journalism Review, Goodale blasts the Obama Administration, calling it the worst for press freedom in history. He compares the Pentagon papers trial to the current Wikileaks battle, saying:

“The biggest challenge today is the threatened prosecution of WikiLeaks… [Assange will] go to jail for doing what every journalist does.” 

Julian Assange was charged with leaking national documents along with Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier accused of having leaked a massive number of classified documents to WikiLeaks. Goodale argues that if Assange is indicted for conspiracy to violate the Espionage Act, Obama would be violating the First Amendment.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-22 16:43

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However the publication will not disappear all together. Daily Variety plans to merge with its weekly sister publication, Variety, to form a new weekly printed edition that will debut on March 26. A new “beefed up” website debuted on March 1, eliminating the subscription-based paywall it had for four years.

Like its rival The Hollywood Reporter, the paper could not sustain its daily publication as advertising revenue came in at just $6 million last year, compared to $30 million in 2006. With its paywall, Variety lost readers to Deadline.com and The Hollywood Reporter.

"We were delivering a print product telling you stories you've already read on our website," Publisher Michelle Sobrino said to the Los Angeles Times. "Financially it didn't make sense."

Associate Features Editor of Variety David S. Cohen wrote about changing times in the media and the publications that cover the media. Without a change to their formula, they “risked the guillotine.” He adds:

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-21 13:42

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At a Moscow State University conference titled Journalism: Social Mission and Profession, Volin spoke to journalism students about his views of the profession of journalism, further igniting the battle for press freedom in Russia.

Emphasizing that journalism is solely a business, Volin told students: "The task of a journalist is to make money for those who hired him, and this can only be done if you become interesting to listeners and readers."

"Journalists should always keep in mind that their task is not to make the world better or lead humanity along the right path" reported iMediaEthics.org.

He warned the university’s lecturers "If you don't teach this - you are committing a crime."

A source told iMediaEthics.org that Russian journalists are being killed in their “efforts to get the truth out” and that they should “just write propaganda. It makes your stomach turn.”

An unnamed journalist in Moscow added, "for a long time the government here has been clamping down on free expression of the media, this latest thing doesn't surprise me in the slightest.”

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-20 16:31

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Listly helps create and embed lists, letting readers vote items up or down, suggest new items, and share specific items on the list with their social networks.

Co-founder Nick Kellet told Journalism.co.uk, "Something like 30 per cent of content on the web is in the form of a list."

Kellet believes Listly has the potential to help journalists and bloggers connect with their audience, rather than just leaving comments.

"If [users] have something to say on the subject, they could be even more of an expert than the actual journalist on that topic."

Listly revamped its site with updates including “lazy loading”—a feature that allows long lists to upload quickly, and a partnership with WordPress. In additon, Listly now offers a premium service aimed at brands and publishers. As part of this service, users can create and share draft lists with a specific group of people before the list is published. The premium accounts are priced at $99 per year for individuals, with a $299 account for teams to be added soon.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-20 12:39

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That’s the prediction from a Dutch designer and printer, who unveiled two new takes on really tiny newspapers at the World Printing Summit on Tuesday.

One prototype is a single broadsheet page, folded and refolded until it is A5 size. You open it, piece by piece, like an unfolding paper flower, to read all the content.

The other version is two broadsheet pages, folded down to A4 size.

Designer Koos Staal thinks these are logical designs – newspapers have been reducing size since the tabloid revolution began in 2003.

But a tabloid really isn’t that small. “If you wanted to read it all, it would take three hours,” he says.

The A5 folded newspaper can be read in a half hour. It has all the elements of a familiar newspaper – about 60 different editorial and advertising components, all on a single broadsheet size page.

The larger version – two full broadsheet pages – takes 45 minutes to read.

Martin van Ee, Sales Director for the printing house Koninklijke BDU Grafisch Bedrijf, says such mini-newspapers will likely include the following components:

-       targeted content with impact and surprise;

-       careful selection of frequency and distribution;

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Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2013-03-19 18:04

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The World Print Summit is looking at the myriad ways to do so: investment, making content more attractive to readers and advertisers, and making production more efficient.

It might seem counterintuitive to invest in printing when the digital world is exploding, but it is those print revenues that are funding much of the digital development at newspaper companies.

While print advertising is declining and digital advertising is growing, digital only accounted for 2.2 per cent of all newspaper advertising globally in 2011, according to the annual World Press Trends survey from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).

When it comes to print, “we know we’re on the downside of the production cycle, but we have no idea how long that period will be. It could be 50 or 100 years," said Eamonn Byrne, Business Director of The Byrne Partnership in the United Kingdom, one of the Print Summit speakers. “What we’re looking at over the next 2,3, 5 years – the money is still all in print.”

There is another reason for not neglecting print as well.

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Author

Dean Roper

Date

2013-03-19 17:51

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In a statement released March 11, Malian journalists declared a strike to demand the release of Boukary Daou, editor of the daily Le Républicain, who was arrested for publishing an open letter criticizing the living conditions of soldiers the salary of Captain Amadou Sanogo, leader of the March 22, 2012 coup that ousted President Toumani Toure.

Daou was arrested without charge since March 6 by the State Security, Mali’s intelligence agency. He is being held without access to lawyers or his family, and he has been beaten and interrogated about the source of the letter, according to media reports. After unsuccessful pleas to secure Dao’s release, media outlets initiated an unprecedented media blackout.

According to a BBC report, in the capital of Bamako where about 40 newspaper titles are published each week, none have appeared on news stands since the blackout. 16 radio stations have also gone silent, or just play music. However state-owned media will continue to run.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-19 11:28


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