WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


February 2013

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Maintaining high ethical standards and high quality journalism is therefore ever more of a challenge, but it is as essential as ever that news organisations embrace this. “For journalism to stay relevant in the future, ethics has to be at the centre,” said Amadou Mahta Ba, CEO of the African Media Initiative.

Added Larry Kilman, Deputy CEO of WAN-IFRA, “The expectation of credibility is part of the DNA of traditional media.”

High ethical standards need to run through the entire news organisation, not just the journalists on the ground. “If you have corrupt relations at a management level, the whole media structure becomes corroded,” said White, pointing to the phone-hacking scandal in the UK which led to the closure of The News of the World and prompted the Leveson Inquiry. The problem here, he stressed, wasn’t just unethical practices by individual reporters, but was rooted in the behaviour of those at the top.

Mahta Ba echoed the idea that we need “ethics at the highest echelons of media,” pointing out that journalists usually have a code of ethics and conduct, but CEOs don’t have any kind of ethical framework through which they work. “Fish start rotting from the head,” he added.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-27 14:04

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The Boston Globe has been making the news as well as reporting it several times in recent days, the latest headline story being that its parent company, The New York Times Co, has put it up for sale. The Times paid $1.1bn for the newspaper in 1993 and is expected to sell it for far less.

The decision “demonstrates our commitment to concentrate our strategic focus and investment on The New York Times brand and its journalism,” said Mark Thompson, the NYT Co’s president and CEO in a press release. The plan to sell the New England Media Group would also mean divesting of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, and the two paper’s related digital properties.

“Given the differences between these businesses and The New York Times, we believe that a sale is in the best long-term interests of these properties and the employees who work for them as well as in the best interests of our shareholders,” Thompson continued. He took up his position in November, after leaving the top post at the BBC.

Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon takes a look at “Who will buy The Boston Globe?” here.

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Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-21 18:30

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The rise of online paywall implementation on news sites has been considerable over the past two years: it doubled for papers in the US in the last year alone. However, for many media houses it is still too early to judge the success of this strategy of stemming plummeting advertising revenues with direct financial support from readers.

Of course, we hear figures from the bigger global brands that show glimmers of hope, but we have to keep in mind that what works for one or two isn't necessarily going to work for everybody.

More recently, we've even seen a demonstration of the power of the individual brand, after Andrew Sullivan collected over $300K from loyal fans within just 24 hours after announcing his plans to move his blog, The Dish, to an independent, reader-supported model.

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Guest

Date

2013-02-20 20:06

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The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 is a picture by Paul Hansen of Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter. The image (above) shows a group of men in Gaza City carrying the bodies of two children, two-year-old Suhaib Hijazi and his older brother Muhammad, who were killed when their house was hit during a missile strike, according to information from World Press Photo. The father of the boys was also killed in the strike, and his body is being carried by a group of men behind those carrying his sons. The bodies are being carried to a mosque for a burial ceremony. The photograph was taken on 20 November 2012 in Gaza City.

“The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget,” said jury member Mayu Mohanna of Peru, in a statement accompanying the announcement of the awards on Friday.

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Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-18 18:54

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The Dentsu advertising agency of Japan is helping Tokyo Shimbun try out a new approach to helping children digitally access the printed newspaper by using the paper’s augmented reality (AR) app.

For a one-day trial, Dentsu worked with newspaper staff to convert nine stories in the paper into a more easily understood format that became visible when a child held a smart phone over the original story. An animated character helped explain the story, which appeared in an alphabet more easily understood by children. You can see a video about the demonstration HERE

Continuing to use the app to help children better understand the news is under discussion, according to Yoshiro Kurauchi, head of the project for Tokyo Shimbun.

Tokyo Shimbun had already been using the same app, “Tokyo AR,” to show films linked to print advertisements. The youth project, done on 20 October 2012, also included four advertisements targeting parents and children. Dentsu reports that at least three companies have since launched dedicated newspaper ads that target both parents and children: Hato Bus (travel), Kirin (soft drinks)and  Meiji (yogurt).

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Author

Aralynn McMane

Date

2013-02-18 18:32

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For many years now – more than a decade, in fact - we've heard predictions of the death of newspapers. But in recent months, I've detected a significant shift, which I'd like to talk about.

I will cite three reports in particular.

BCG Report on Transformation

The first is the most recent one I've come across - a report by the Boston Consulting Group or BCG, titled "Transforming Print Media."

BCG consultants must have learnt from the newspapers they've worked with, because their newspoint was in the very first paragraph of their report. Here's their intro:

"Conventional wisdom says newspaper and magazine publishing is a dying business. Based on our work with print media companies in North and South America, Europe and Asia, we believe that the conventional wisdom is wrong."

When I read this, I went - Alleluia!

Some of us in SPH have long believed this. I've been saying so at these annual awards every year.

BCG goes on to explain why: "In most countries, print media companies continue to have commanding brands and strong consumer relationships.” And print media continue to generate “enviable cash flows."

However, the news is not uniformly good. Because, at the same time, “demographic evolution, technological revolution and changing preferences for how people consume media have made deep inroads into circulation and advertising".

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Patrick Daniel

Date

2013-02-15 16:21

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The Society for News Design yesterday announced the winners of their latest annual competition and named five newspapers as "World's Best-Designed."

The winners for 2012, with links to the SND judges' comments, are:

Dagens Nyheter (Stockholm, Sweden)

Die Zeit (Hamburg, Germany)

The Grid (Toronto, Canada)

Politiken (Copenhagen, Denmark)

Welt am Sonntag (Berlin, Germany)

European newspapers dominated the award this year, and four of the five winners had won the honour at least once in the past. Germany's Die Zeit received the award for the sixth time (it won previously in 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2004)

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Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-14 18:04

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Gloria Brown Anderson, former president of the World Editors Forum and a long-standing WEF board member, will leave her position at The New York Times tomorrow, 15 February, to start a media consulting company.

Anderson has worked at The New York Times for more than 20 years and has been vice president of International & Editorial Development for the past 11 years, where among other projects, “she helped create and nourish The New York Times International Weekly, a supplement for leading international newspapers [such as Today in Singapore], which today appears in 28 countries and 5 languages. It has a combined circulation of nearly 5 million copies,” according to a statement recently sent to staff regarding her departure.

In addition, it noted that “she created and helped launch 'Turning Points,' an end-of-year licensed magazine. The current edition is being published in 23 countries, including China, Mexico, Mongolia, Croatia and Egypt."

Anderson has been a member of the WEF board since 2000.

She was hired by The New York Times in 1992 as an editor of Week in Review. In 1997, she became president and editor-in-chief of The NYTT Syndication Sales Corp., where she oversaw its transition from a corporate entity to a unit of the newspaper.

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Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-14 15:16

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On Monday, the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism released a report titled “Newspapers Turning Ideas into Dollars,” which spotlights four US daily newspapers that are finding success through actively rethinking and reworking their business models.

The publishers in the four case studies are taking different approaches and the report emphasises the importance of tailoring efforts to match the audience: “Customizing the business model for the community, these newspaper executives say, is a key component of success,” it states.

The report also notes that “the leaders at these papers are risk takers who concluded that the biggest risk was not rethinking their business models.”

Written by Pew’s Mark Jurkowitz, the four in-depth case studies featured in the report are:

- The Naples (Florida) Daily News, which revamped its sales force to have staff focus on business categories that allow them to better relate to their clients and potential clients: “any media organization needs to be customized for the market, the local community. … The retooling of our advertising is seventy percent of our success,” says Publisher Dave Neill, in the report.

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Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-13 15:11

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Aftonbladet, Sweden’s most-read newspaper, has announced that it made more money from digital advertising than print for the whole of 2012. It is the first newspaper in Sweden to do this, “and probably in the world,” said its editor-in-chief and managing director Jan Helin in a blog post.

Advertising revenues at Sweden’s top tabloid were split 56% digital and 44% print for 2012. Overall, the paper reported a profit of €36.8million (SEK 312m), an announcement said. This is a small increase on 2011, when digital advertising was higher than print for seven months out of the year.

“It is historic and it is what makes Aftonbladet the market leader among Swedish newspapers and the leading publication through the structural transformation from analogue to digital,” said Helin.

Online ad revenue at the paper increased by 18%. The fastest growth was in mobile, where ad revenue was €8.8million (SEK 75m), three times as much as in 2011. Helin has previously said that he expects mobile to be the most-accessed form of Aftonbladet by 2014.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-13 13:32

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Hyperlocal news websites in the US took a bit of a beating this week.

First came the news yesterday that NBC has abruptly closed EveryBlock, a sad move that seems to have surprised about everyone, including Adrian Holovaty, who founded EveryBlock in 2007 with a staff of four after receiving a Knight Foundation grant.

The EveryBlock websites covered 19 large US cities, beginning with Chicago, and were heavily automated using algorithms and public records data to provide a wealth of block-by-block information. Over time, EveryBlock also introduced ways for residents to share information with each other, such as utilities being out in a particular area. In a blog post in early November, EveryBlock staffers noted ways that neighbours had used the sites to connect and share information during Hurricane Sandy.

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Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-08 20:30

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Google and the French government have come to an agreement that will see Google creating a €60m Digital Publishing Innovation Fund to support “transformative digital publishing initiatives” and to deepen partnerships between Google and French publishers to help increase the latter’s online revenue using Google’s advertising technology.

The two parties have been involved in negotiations for three months after the French press demanded that Google pay for linking to news content so abundantly via its search engine. Google refused, arguing that it sends a vast amount of traffic to news sites via the links in question. French president François Hollande had set a deadline of 31 January to resolve the issue, promising to introduce a legislation to tax Google if negotiations were not successful.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2013-02-04 18:23


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