WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


September 2012

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Even The New York Times’ Public Editor Margaret Sullivan reads the newspaper digitally first. “Certainly before I leave the house in the morning, I’ve gone to The Times website and given it a pretty good read,” she told The Atlantic Wire. “I see it on the web before I see it in print.”

Sullivan is part of a majority (55 percent) of The Times’ regular readers who now click or tap through the paper in web or app form more often than they thumb through it in print, according to a Pew survey published yesterday.

While The Times is presently the only one of America’s three highest-circulation newspapers to have passed the half-way point in its readers’ screenward migration, the nation’s two biggest dailies are close behind: 48 percent of regular USA Today readers claim to access the publication mostly in digital form (tied with 48 percent who lean toward print), and 44 percent of Wall Street Journal readers favour digital, compared with 54 percent who still mostly read the country’s highest-circulation daily in print.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-28 17:25

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We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think — either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

The newsonomics of Pricing 201, NiemanLab.org

News industry analyst Ken Doctor offers several lessons learned about what is working best for news publishers using digital subscription models. “Now, waist-deep into the digital circulation revenue revolution, we’re adding fact to hunch, data to intuition,” he writes. Among the lessons he sites: Digital can be used to reinforce print — for now; Content counts more than ever; and Setting the meter ever lower is key to creating member value — and revenue.

In Changing News Landscape, Even Television is Vulnerable, Pew Research Center

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-28 16:31

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In the Q&A that followed a lecture by the Guardian’s Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger at the Sciences Po School of Journalism in Paris earlier this month, a student seated near the back of the intimate lecture theatre posed an inevitable question. To paraphrase: what would it take to get a job in your newsroom?

Rusbridger prefaced his response by congratulating the 40-odd assembled students for possessing enough grit to be pursuing a journalism education under present circumstances. He then conjured the image of a candidate who is excited about the challenges and opportunities inherent in this period of upheaval; a journalist who lives and breathes digital, has a head filled with inventive ideas, and ideally, is something of a data whisperer.

It seems as if these are exactly the kinds of graduates who will be turned out by the new Guardian News & Media/Cardiff University Masters in Journalism with Digital Media, which was announced in a press release on the Guardian’s website yesterday. The yearlong, London-based post-graduate programme has yet to receive official validation, but aims to convene its first class of students in September 2013.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-27 18:22

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We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think - either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

Revolutionary press blooms underground in Syria, AFP

“Dozens” of independent grassroots newspapers and websites have emerged in Syria since the outbreak of the revolts last year, this article from AFP reports. Most are accessed online, but some are printed and distributed. Many are run by inexperienced citizen journalists who struggle for funding, but the efforts to keep people informed and fight for free expression in a country in the grips of horrific civil war are heartening. 

Google Play store hits 25 billion downloads, launches discounts, CNET.com

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-27 16:54

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On September 26 Italy's supreme court sentenced Alessandro Sallusti, editor-in-chief of the daily Il Giornale, to 14 months in jail for defamation.

Sallusti was found guilty of aggravated defamation over an article that appeared in 2007 about a thirteen-year-old girl who had an abortion. The article was published in Libero, a daily newspaper of which Sallusti was editor-in-chief at the time, and was written by another journalist and signed under the pseudonym 'Dreyfus'. It was considered to be defamatory against the judge of Turin Giuseppe Cocilovo, who gave consent for the abortion. According to Italian law, Sallusti, as editor-in-chief of the paper, is liable for everything that is published, which is even more relevant in case of an anonymous article.

Italy's highest court rejected Sallusti’s appeal and condemned him to 14 months in jail with no parole, and ordered him to pay court expenses and reimburse the plaintiff for a total of €4,500 expenses incurred during the proceedings, A.G.I. reported.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-27 15:44

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We are experimenting with replacing our "Media links" post with a feed of "Recommended reading," where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think - either in the comments section below this post or send an email to emma.goodman@wan-ifra.org

How journalists can turn their stories into conversations, Poynter.org

Everyone agrees engagement with readers is important and this article offers several suggestions for increasing that engagement. Likewise, it points out some reasons that current engagement might be low and what can be done about them.

Building a better sports bar: SB Nation redesigns its blog network, NiemanLab.org 

This sports blog network has just finished a redesign and tackled a number of issues that large news publishing companies face: how to modernise the site while “also unifying the look of more than 300 distinct sites. And they had to do it in a way that balances the needs of the fan communities of each site while giving the entire network a universal consistency,” writes Justin Ellis.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-26 18:35

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Though recent events may suggest otherwise, the British royal family aren’t fans of baring all. A constitutional monarch, the Queen refrains from publicly voicing her opinion on decisions taken by the governments formed in her name or on political issues of national and international significance.

Royal protocol dictates that conversations conducted in a private setting between the Queen and journalists are treated as being strictly off the record. Decades, centuries even, of adhering to this convention meant that BBC correspondent Frank Gardner’s decision to report details of a private conversation he’d had with the Queen took the nation by surprise.

Discussing the extradition of Abu Hamza on BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme, the respected security journalist revealed: “the Queen was pretty upset […] that there was no way to arrest him [Hamza]. She couldn’t understand why, there must surely have been some law that he had broken. Well in the end sure enough there was.” Pressed by a clearly stunned James Naughtie, Gardner went on to disclose that the Queen has raised the matter with the Home Secretary at the time.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 17:57

Charlie Hebdo
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Following its last highly controversial issue which featured cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammed, satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has printed two editions this week, one "responsible" and one "irresponsible." Last week’s cartoons mocked the explosive reaction to the film "The Innocence of Muslims" by parodying a popular French film, "Untouchables," and portrayed Muhammad in a series of poses, in one of which he is naked.

In addition to the standard issue, this week’s "responsible" edition of Charlie Hebdo contains no pictures and very little text – the clear message being that to be "responsible" is extremely limiting and does not actually mean doing real journalism. Aside from an editorial from Stéphane Charbonnier, or Charb, the weekly’s publisher, the paper only contains headlines and blank spaces. The ironic headlines include “Tunisia – all is well,” “Morocco – all is well,” “Egypt – all is well” and “Libya – all is well,” following by “Mali – all is going very well.” Others include “Prudence is the mother of safety” and “Do you know how to plant cabbages?”

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-26 16:32

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Vietnamese authorities declared three bloggers guilty of “spreading propaganda against the state” after a brief, high-security trial in Ho Chi Minh City on Monday, sentencing them to between four and 12 years in jail, followed by house arrest.

All three are founding members of the Club for Free Journalists, a group established in 2007 to promote liberty of expression in the tightly controlled communist country. They were accused of posting political articles on this organisation’s website, and for writing about forbidden subjects such as state corruption and social justice on their individual blogs.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-26 15:59

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Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente is facing charges of plagiarism, and the Canadian newspaper has been accused of mishandling the situation. Here are some CliffsNotes (or Coles Notes if you're Canadian) on the scandal thus far, organised using social curation tool Storify.

[View the story "The Margaret Wente plagiarism scandal" on Storify]

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-25 19:02

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We are experimenting with replacing our ‘Media Links’ post with a feed of ‘Recommended Reading,’ where we will not only suggest to you what we think are some of the most interesting articles around today, but we will highlight why we think they are worth reading. Do let us know what you think!

Patch redesign emphasizes social as path to revenue growth, StreetFightMag.com

Patch, AOL’s hyperlocal news venture, has come under much fire for disrupting local news markets across the US and for failing to find a business model. This article claims that Patch is moving “away from a traditional editorial news property and into a more social, user-driven service:” is this a step in the right direction towards commercial success? What can others learn from this?

Fortune Changes iPad Strategy, Introduces 'Freemium' App Edition, AdAge.com

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-25 18:48

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After the US, the UK, Canada, France and Spain it’s now time for The Huffington Post phenomon to hit Italy, where L’Huffington Post launched today.

Following the now usual practice of teaming up with a local mainstream news organization, L’HuffPost partnered with Gruppo L’Espresso, publisher of the daily La Repubblica and the weekly L’Espresso, having partnered with Le Monde and Les Nouvelles Editions indépendantes in France and El Pais in Spain.

Former TV journalist and former president of the public broadcasting company RAI, Lucia Annunziata has been named editorial director, while editor-in-chief will be the former editor of L’Espresso Gianni Del Vecchio.

L’HuffPost will follow the recipe of its international counterparts: a mix of reporting, aggregation and crowdsourcing participation in the form of unpaid blogs. A team of journalists, who will be dealing with original content on the site, will go alongside an army of bloggers ranging from well-known politicians of the left and the right, activists, and intellectuals to totally unknown citizens.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-25 18:46

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Arthur Brisbane, the former Public Editor of The New York Times, offers his thoughts and impressions on that job in an exit interview with Craig Silverman on Poynter.

On Nieman Lab, Andrew Phelps offers a first look at Spundge, a new "software to help journalists to manage real-time data streams."

The US-based Star-Tribune reports it is launching a new product this week called Radius, which offers "a new array of digital marketing services to small- and medium-sized businesses, many of whom have never advertised with the traditional newspaper."

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-24 18:04

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“I’d like to thank Dick for ruining my attention span, malnourishing my children, and making every copy editor I have worked with for the past four years curse the mention of my name,” joked Emily Bell, on stage with Dick Costolo at the Hyatt Regency hotel in San Francisco on Friday afternoon.

It was the second day of the Online News Association Conference and Awards (ONA 2012), and Bell, Director of the Tao Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, was engaging in a cheerful but piercing luncheon interview with the Twitter CEO about the social network’s influence on journalism (video below). The following evening, the conference culminated with the ONA Awards, during which jagged, transparent statuettes were presented to the winners of digital journalism prizes in more than 30 categories.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-24 16:46

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This editorial is a joint statement from the Vienna-based International Press Institute (IPI) and the Paris and Darmstadt-based World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA).

 

In the United States, a movie trailer of uncertain origin is posted on YouTube, purporting to promote “Innocence of Muslims”. Though the trailer is an unbearably stupid, incredibly offensive portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad, with production values of a high-school parody, the trailer sets off a wave of anti-American violence in the Middle East.

Let’s not let the harmful acts of a few overshadow the rest.

Though the average American would be offended by the portrayal, and would agree the film does not represent common perceptions about Islam, American embassies across the Middle East and North Africa have become the target of protests and attacks. The spread, scale and intensity of the protests are surprising when one considers how marginal and absurd the film is that purportedly sparked them.

Sustained demonstrations against U.S. embassies have been reported in some 20 countries around the world, and have resulted in several deaths. The most shocking attack occurred on a consulate in Libya, where four Americans, including the ambassador, Christopher Stevens, were killed. (Officials in Libya have since arrested a number of people in connection with what may have been a premeditated attack.)

Author

Guest

Date

2012-09-24 15:39

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Pubblico, the independent Italian newspaper that launched on Tuesday, is off to a flying start. According to news website Lettera 43, the paper sold 50,000 copies of its first issue. Pubblico’s founder, journalist Luca Telese, has hailed this initial success as a victory over sceptics who thought a print-based venture was destined for failure.

On Poynter, journalism educator Kelly Fincham offers advice on "What every young journalist should know about using Twitter."

"We access news on multiple devices. Shouldn’t those devices be smart enough to connect our actions to their presentation?" Analyst Ken Doctor discusses "all-access delight" in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Lab.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-21 18:54

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South African newspaper the Citizen has admitted that it made a mistake by publishing a manipulated photograph on the front page of its Wednesday edition, after the cover elicited strong reactions from journalists about the ethics of editing news images.

The photograph, supplied by news agency Agence-France Presse (AFP), was taken after a suicide attack killed 12 people, including eight South African aviation workers, in Kabul, Afghanistan on September 18. In the original image, two bodies lie beside the charred skeleton of a minibus that was blown up in the attack. In the version that was published, the bodies have been digitally wiped from the picture.

The Citizen released a statement on Thursday, explaining that during an editorial meeting on Tuesday, the photograph was deemed too graphic to publish in its natural state, and a decision was taken to blur the bodies. Instead, they were “digitally cloned out of the photo,” apparently inadvertantly. “The photo should never have been published in that form,” said the Citizen’s Editor Martin Williams. “We regret this and are taking steps to ensure that it does not happen again,” continued the statement.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-21 17:48

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The New York Times is putting an end to the practice of allowing sources to approve their quotations, Public Editor Margaret Sullivan has announced in the Public Editor’s Journal, citing a memorandum that was sent through the newspaper’s glass-fronted headquarters on Thursday.

“Despite our reporters’ best efforts, we fear that demands for after-the-fact ‘quote approval’ by sources and their press aides have gone too far,” begins the memo, which Sullivan includes in full in her post. “Starting now, we want to draw a clear line on this. Citing Times policy, reporters should say no if a source demands, as a condition of an interview, that quotes be submitted afterward to the source or a press aide to review, approve or edit.”

For the Times’ new ombudswoman, whose tenure began on September 1, this can be seen as an early triumph. On Monday, Sullivan argued on the Public Editor’s Journal (which has received a greater-than-average amount of attention over the last three weeks) that “The Times Needs a Policy on Quotation Approval, and Soon.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-21 15:05

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In the UK, the Daily Mail's website, MailOnline, has passed the 100 million unique browser mark for the first time, according to new figures released by ABC and reported by Press Gazette. The site recorded a record 105,720,020 in August 2012, which represents a 41.1 percent increase over August 2011.

Journal Register Company, which recently filed for bankruptcy, is likely to reduce print frequency at some of its 20 US daily newspapers, writes Rick Edmonds on Poynter's website.

The Guardian's Roy Greenslade reports that the number of signers to a petition "urging Sun editor Dominic Mohan to stop publishing page 3 girl pictures," has now nearly doubled in just the past couple of days to more than 23,000.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-20 18:20

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This week’s edition of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo sold out almost immediately Wednesday morning after it once again printed cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, raising fears of hostile reactions and launching a debate about the balance between freedom of expression and journalistic responsibility at a time of acute tension in the Islamic world.

“To calm things down after the film ‘The Innocence of Muslims,’ Charlie would like to announce… the publication of ‘Untouchable 2,’” proclaimed a post on the magazine’s Facebook page last night, making light of the deadly unrest that has torn through the Muslim world, claiming the lives of over 30 people, after excerpts from an amateurish video mocking Islam were broadcast on YouTube on September 11.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-19 18:43

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The Guardian has announced that Tanya Cordrey has been named to the new role of Chief Digital Officer. She is currently GNM's Director of Digital Development. In the same announcement, the company said David Pemsel, GNM's interim Chief Marketing Officer, has been promoted to the new position of Chief Commercial Officer.

The Huffington Post reports that Se & Hoer, a Danish celebrity weekly magazine, will publish the topless photos of the Duchess of Cambridge in a 16-page supplement that is sold with its Thursday edition.

Speaking of Huffington Post, an article on Mashable describes what a smash hit HuffPost Live has been in its first month on the air. To date, "HuffPost Live has aired 12 hours of original video per day, five days a week, with more than 2,000 guests appearing on air," according to the Mashable report.

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-19 17:57

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Today, September 19, is Italy's “Day of Transparency:" which activists hope to use to put pressure on the government for the adoption of a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) in the country.

A group of associations and prominent individuals started a campaign last spring to demand the introduction of a law that allows citizens to have access to  documentation from the public administration. The initiative was presented at the Italian Parliament on May 29 this year. Amongst the organizers are the Italian Association of Newspaper Publishers (FIEG) and the National Federation of the Italian Press (FNSI) and personalities like Valerio Onida, President emeritus of the Constitutional Court.
Gathered today in Rome at the headquarters of the FNSI, the promoters are holding a conference with speeches from professors, politicians and journalists.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-09-19 12:40

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BBC's new director general vows to re-invent content, not just re-purpose it, says paidContent, while the Guardian reports on George Entwistle's plans for a "radical" shape-up at the BBC.

The editor of the Irish Daily Star has been suspended following the paper's publication of the topless duchess photos, according to Press Gazette.

While back in France where the pictures were originally published, Closer is now being sued by Dominique Strauss Kahn, says LePoint.fr.

Roy Greenslade describes the acceleration of the Change.org 'drop page 3' campaign, which is calling upon Sun Editor Dominic Mahon to stop printing or posting pictures of topless women.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-18 18:50

independent voices
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The Independent has launched a new site called Independent Voices to focus on commentary and opinion content, combined with input from readers. “Its mission is captured in three words: Comment, Campaigns, Community,” said the platform’s editor Amol Rajan and editor-in-chief Evgeny Lebedev in an announcement on the site.

It will have its own editorial line and be independent of the Independent newspaper, Rajan said in another post. “What I want us to achieve is a marriage of editorial brilliance, in the form of strong and clear argument, with digital power, in the form of viral campaigns – all of it in alliance with a community of ultra-engaged users.”

The Independent print product’s Opinion pages will, however, be renamed Independent Voices. The paper has a long history of focusing on comment and opinion, since former editor Simon Kelner's editorial strategy that was dubbed the 'viewspaper' concept back in 2003.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-18 18:21


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