WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


May 2012

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Plenty has been written about a shortage of women in the newsroom.

Last December a study by Guardian journalist Kira Cochrane suggested that 78% of articles that appeared in British national dailies were written by men.

Last February a group of German journalists got together to complain that, in the German newspaper industry, just 2% of editors-in-chief were women.

The same month, the group VIDA: Women in Literary Arts published a study suggesting that the overwhelming majority of articles in major literary magazines had male authors.

Now, a fresh study has been published, which indicates that women are also being severely under-represented in op-ed writing as well. Poynter reports on a byline survery conducted by the OpEd Project, which suggests that although there have been significant improvements in the proportion of women authoring opinion articles, the subjects they write on still continue to be stereotypical female – food, family, furniture and fashion.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-31 18:21

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Good news for royalists and for fans of free content. Press Gazette reports that The Times and Sunday Times of London will be dropping their paywalls this weekend in honour of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. The Sunday Times app will also be available for free trial period over the weekend, notes the article.

Will Bunch from Poynter weighs the arguments about the New Orleans Times-Picayune’s decision to cut print publication to just three days a week and go digital first. In this thoughtful article, Bunch suggests ways to move beyond the conflict between print-first and digital-first advocates, and create better and more inclusive news reporting in New Orleans.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-31 17:40

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In countries like Syria, where the authorities make it nearly impossible for professional journalists to operate, citizen journalism has become crucial to keeping the world informed about what is happening on the ground.

To facilitate this difficult, dangerous and frequently deadly work, the live video streaming service Bambuser announced yesterday that it will start giving citizen journalists free premium access to its product.

Citizen reporters who want to apply simply have to email info@bambuser.com with their Bambuser username and a short description of the content they produce. In return, the video streamer promises to give them an ad-free service with unlimited viewing hours and storage, as well as access to statistics about their videos and special customisation options.

Normally premium access costs between €99 and €499 a month and, even at the top end, viewing hours are not unlimited.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-30 18:20

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Journalists at Fairfax, Australia’s second largest newspaper company, have voted in favour of a 36-hour strike to protest against the outsourcing of 66 sub-editing jobs to New Zealand. The Australian Broadcast Corporation and the Wall Street Journalreport.

Also from Australia, Best Practices, a new blog launched today, intends to follow the development of digital publishing mores, from authentication to transparency. Read more at Journalism.co.uk.

And because it's important to have two sources, AP has released its 2012 Stylebook, with new sections on broadcast and social media, writes Mallary Jean Tenore of Poynter.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-30 18:15

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Newsrooms from Montreal to Denver are editing out their copy desks to keep up with digital’s dual imperative: tight deadlines and tighter budgets.

Monday’s announcement by Postmedia Network means that dozens of copy editing jobs will be axed across Canada in coming weeks; Twitter speculation has it that 23 editors will be let go at the Montreal Gazette alone, reports the Huffington Post Canada.

Yesterday, Postmedia's the National Post offered a warning of the perils of doing away with copy editors when it mistakenly published a crossword puzzle that had already been filled in, revealed Poynter.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-30 13:54

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President Rafael Correa of Ecuador has launched another attack on the “corrupt” private press, publically tearing up a copy of newspaper La Hora and calling for Ecuadorians to boycott the non-state media, reported the news agency AFP.

“We can achieve a citizen boycott of this press. We have 80% of popular support,” announced the left-wing populist leader before an audience of labourers in a southern Quito neighbourhood on Saturday. Correa’s comments were made in the context of one of his weekly cadenas: presidential addresses delivered in different parts of the country and broadcast on national television and radio channels.

In cadenas past, Correa has referred to journalists as “imbecile,” “stupid,” “ink-stained hitmen” and “mafiosos,” according to a WAN-IFRA Report on Press Freedom in Ecuador published in January.

“About 400 or 500 radio stations throughout the country transmit these Saturday broadcasts, many of them out of fear that otherwise they would not be granted government advertising contracts,” said Ecuadorian Radio Broadcasting Association President Otto Sonnengolzner Sper to WAN-IFRA's Press Freedom team in November.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-29 19:11

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The Russian radio presenter Sergei Aslanyan has been hospitalised, after being lured out of his house and stabbed 20 times in the arms, neck and chest, says the Guardian. The article reports that Izvestiya newspaper has suggested that the attack may be linked to a recent radio appearance made by Aslanyan, in which he said disparaging things about the prophet Mohammed. However, it also notes that the attack may be connected with reporting that Aslanyan has done on the Russian car industry and corruption among traffic police.

The Guardian’s Datablog and Datastore celebrated their third birthday last April, at the same time as clocking up an an average of more that 1 million monthly users over the past year, writes Journalism.co.uk. The article quotes Simon Rogers, editor of the Guardian’s data content, who says, “For us, what started off as an exercise for developers has proved really successful with the general readership too.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-29 18:42

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South Africa’s City Press has removed a controversial likeness of President Jacob Zuma from its website in an effort to restore calm, following a largely unsuccessful boycott over the weekend— called for by the African National Congress (ANC) party— in which copies of the Sunday newspaper were set ablaze and journalists reportedly received death threats.

The ANC party spokesman Jackson Mthembu has allegedly welcomed the withdrawal, but continues to demand an apology from Editor-in-Chief Ferial Haffajee, according an update on City Press' website.

Haffajee announced her decision to pull the image of Brett Murray’s painting “The Spear,” which depicts President Jacob Zuma with exposed genitals, from the publication’s website this morning, and followed up with an elucidatory editorial entitled “The spear is down – out of care and fear.”

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-28 18:00

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Fresh off the media gossip mill, New York magazine has delved into the "whodunnit” surrounding the firing of former New York Times CEO Janet Robinson last December. The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade and Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon discuss Joe Hagan’s article.

Wasting no time on such frivolities, The New York Times updated its iPad and iPhone apps last week, reported the Nieman Journalism Lab. The new app will download content automatically overnight to save readers time and bandwidth and allow them to better customize their reading experience.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-28 17:59

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“This was a key change in our operation and it has proven extremely successful,” says Martin Jönsson, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Svenska Dagbladet. “By reducing the evening shift – we have one night editor and four page designers working nights nowadays, compared to a total of 15-16 before 2010 – we have fewer people locked into shift work.”

In addition, he says that through this staffing shift “we have been able to strengthen the daytime desks and have more editors working on planning, coaching and idea development, even though the total workforce has been reduced (from 225 in 2009 to 175 today). But more importantly, it has contributed to a major shift when it comes to the mindset of everyone in the newsroom, together with our clear strategy of how our journalism should change. Our focus today is very much on live reporting for the website or mobile and on agenda-setting journalism and in-depth reporting for the newspaper. It has been a strong shift over time: in avoiding reporting ‘yesterday’s news’ in print.”

Sweden’s biggest morning daily online

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-05-28 14:40

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If you want to see an example of the media working together with its audience to create valuable journalism, you need look no further than the Quién es Quién section of the digital Colombian publication La Silla Vacía.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-28 12:43

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Any digital journalist knows that an infographic can tell a thousand words. While stringing a coherent sentence together used to require a great deal of learning in the language of code, this is no longer the case.

Data journalists at publications like the New York Times and the Guardian have, in recent years, elevated interactive graphics and data visualization to an art form. Meanwhile, the proliferation of build-your-own-infographic sites has empowered the rest of us to produce rougher, humbler versions, free of charge.

Tech entrepreneurs HackFwd launched one such site, Infogr.am, in public beta yesterday. The site invites you to log on using Facebook or Twitter, select a template, enter data in an Excel-style worksheet, embellish the automatically-conjured graphic with text, images and quotes, and share your masterpiece through the online channel of your choice.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 19:20

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Thousands of students took to the streets in Mexico City yesterday to march against the political bias that they say has infected the national media in the lead-up to the presidential elections on July 1.

This was the second press freedom protest in Mexico's capital in under a week, and simultaneous demonstrations were held thorughout the country. Hailing from a wide range of private and public universities, students congregated on Twitter under the hashtag #YoSoy132. Their common goal, as stated by the movement's website, is the promotion of transparency, plurality and democracy in the Mexican media.

Mexico is among the world's most dangerous countries for journalism, with five journalists murdered since the start of 2012 according to the Knight Centre for Journalism in the Americas.

However, the protesters' stated adversary was not gang-related violence, but partisan manipulation: they claim that the presidential campaign coverage by major newspapers and television networks, and particularly Mexico’s dominant television network, Televisa, has been slanted in favour of frontrunner Enrique Peña Nieto, who has a double-digit lead in the polls. Peña Nieto belongs to the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which held power in Mexico for 70 years before being voted out in 2000.

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Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 15:52

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South Africa’s ruling African National Congress (ANC) party has called for a boycott of the Sunday newspaper City Press, demanding that it remove an image of “The Spear,” a painting by artist Brett Murray depicting President Jacob Zuma in a Lenin pose with exposed genitalia, from its website.

City Press has refused to censor the image. In a May 18 column titled "The spear of the nation stays up," Editor-in-Chief Ferial Haffajee defended the paper’s decision as part of its commitment to the freedom of expression, which is enshrined in South Africa’s constitution in order to protect "art that pushes boundaries" and "journalism that upsets holy cows," she wrote.

"City Press covered an art exhibition, an interesting and remarkable exhibition that marks a renaissance in protest art, which we are tracking...To ask us now, as the ANC has done, to take down an image from our website is to ask us to participate in an act of censorship. As journalists worth our salt, we can’t."

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-25 13:16

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Argentina’s La Nación has stepped up its data strategy, pairing its reporters with programmers to mine for original stories in mountains of raw information, and to create unique data visualizations. Antonio Jiménez from the Nieman Journalism Lab describes how the Buenos Aires-based daily built up its data squad.

A “radically simplified” version of WordPress is in the works, revealed the platform’s founder Matt Mullenweg at yesterday's paidContent conference. WordPress's flexibility is such that its system is reported to be used for one in eight websites. The new interface promises to be less complicated, and better-suited to smartphones.

Bittersweet news in Daily Mail & General Trust’s latest financial results: overall profits are down, as are print revenues, but digital earnings have seen a heartening jump. Mark Sweney reports and Roy Greenslade comments.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-24 17:54

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The UK Supreme Court is preparing to decide next Wednesday whether Julian Assange should be deported to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over allegations of sexual assault, reports the Guardian. The paper writes that the verdict is likely to hinge on the judges’ decision over whether the European Arrest Warrant issued for Assange is valid.

El Pais has posted a video interview with John Paton, CEO of Digital First Media, who explains the “digital first” philosophy that underpins his company. “Technology is 100% of the future,” he says.

Press Gazette reports that the Sun’s Fabulous magazine is re-launching its website in a new, blog-style format. The article notes that stories used to be posted on the website just once a week, but now, according to editor Rachel Richardson, it will be edited “literally minute by minute.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 17:07

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Remember the days before Craigslist, when newspapers made money from classified advertising?

In the year 2000, the U.S. newspaper industry brought in a high of nearly $20 billion dollars in classified revenue; by 2009, this figure had plummeted to under $10 billion. Meanwhile, the number of adult Internet users who visited online classified sites jumped from 22% in 2005 to 49% in 2009, according to findings from the Pew Research Centre’s Internet & American Life Project.

Since last fall, the Guardian Media Group has worked to recapture some of that lost revenue with n0tice.com, the digital answer to a community centre corkboard, which asks users, “what’s happening near you?” To post is free, but as with promoted Tweets, n0tice-ers can bump their bulletins to a privileged spot on the board for a fee.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-23 13:24

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NPR announced yesterday that has it hired the Chicago Tribune’s Brian Boyer to direct a new team, dedicated to building news applications. NPR has produced news apps previously, such as this interactive look at the science of “Fracking” to extract gas, and this map of air-polluting facilities in the US. However, the staff who have worked on these types of projects haven’t been coordinated in a single department, and Boyer’s appointment will bring them together.

Mark Stencel, NPR’s Managing Editor for digital news, who will be in charge of Boyer and his team, tells Poynter; “what I’m hoping is that, by taking these positions and putting them together as a team, we’ll be able to do a higher level of [work] than we’ve been able to do with scattered design, database and development resources.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-23 10:37

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The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) is pleased to invite newspaper and online media managers and editors from select countries in South East Asia and Middle East & North Africa to apply for a groundbreaking new professional development programme.

The WAN-IFRA Media Professionals Programme (MPP) provides mid-level media professionals from the commercial and editorial side of newspapers and online media with personalised, high-impact leadership development opportunities. It equips them with sustainable strategies, skills and support networks to advance their careers and contribute to the growth of financially viable and editorially strong media enterprises in the region.

Media professionals from the following countries are encouraged to apply: Cambodia, Myanmar & Vietnam (SEA programme) and Egypt, Libya & Tunisia (MENA programme).

Successful applicants will benefit from the following development opportunities as part of the programme:

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-05-23 09:29

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Capital New York writes that the Huffington Post is pushing ahead with its plans to launch a live video streaming network. The new product, which has been named HuffPost Live, aims to feature 12 hours of original programming every weekday, produced by a staff of around 100, says the article.

As Erik Wemple at the Washington Post reported yesterday, The New York Times Public Editor Arthur Brisbane will be stepping down at the beginning on September. Now Craig Silverman at Poynter suggests five qualities that The Times should look for as it tries to find a new person to fill the roll.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-22 17:30

(c) Margot L'Hermite / Creative Commons
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Aurélie Filippetti, inaugurated last week as France’s Minister for Culture and Communication in President François Hollande's new Socialist government, has outlined a strategy to create more distance between the country's public media authorities and its president, and to tighten the legal protection for journalists' sources.

Speaking on radio network France Inter yesterday, Filippetti announced intentions to carry out President Hollande’s campaign promise to reform the current system— in which France’s president handpicks several of the national news industry’s key players, from members of the Conseil supérieur de l’audiovisuel (CSA), an elite council that regulates national audiovisual media, to heads of public television and radio news networks— by early 2013.

The president of France has been responsible for appointing three of the CSA’s nine members, including its president, since the Council was founded during the presidency of François Mitterrand in 1989. Outgoing president Nicolas Sarkozy further empowered the executive branch to appoint the directors of the country’s public television and radio channels in 2009.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-22 17:08

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Eric Newton, senior adviser to the president at Knight Foundation, has criticised the state of journalism education in the US, reports Steve Myers at Poynter. Newton argues that most journalism teaching centers had been slow to adapt to changes in the news industry and he suggests that, it should be reformed to allow more input from journalism professionals as well as academics.

The New York Times reports that Pakistani authorities blocked access to Twitter on Sunday, after accusing the social network of promoting a cartoon contest on Facebook to post images of the prophet Mohammed. Twitter access was restored around 10pm Sunday evening, notes the article, at which time “It remained unclear — and unlikely — that Twitter had agreed to the demands of the Pakistani government”.

WikiLeaks Tweeted today that the organisation is preparing to file suit against the US military over the case of Bradley Manning, the US soldier accused of having leaked a massive number of classified documents to the whistleblowing organisation.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-21 18:25

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The story breaks – a fire, earthquake, shooting or protest – and the race begins. You need to speak with someone who is at the scene, right now. Sifting through social media content can be a slow and painstaking process, with no guarantee that you will find an eyewitness source. Enter Geofeedia; a tool that allows journalists to zoom in on social media users posting geographically tagged tweets, photos and videos in a specified area.

Formally launched last week after months of testing, Geofeedia aggregates location-linked posts from Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Flickr and Picasa. By entering an address or drawing a circle on a map, you can call up the content being generated in your target region in real time. The creators vaunt it as a valuable tool for tracking down sources and images when text searches such as keywords and hashtags do not suffice.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-05-21 16:16

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The Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas reports that a journalist has been kidnapped by three armed men in the northeastern Mexican state of Sonora. Marcos Ávila covers crime for the paper El Regional de Sonora.

The European Journalism Centre has posted a video interview with Dimitri Muratov, Editor-in-Chief of the Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta, about social media’s role in investigative journalism.

Paul Egglestone, digital coordinator at the University of Central Lancashire's School of Journalism, writes in a blog post for the BBC College of Journalism that his department is developing a new platform for community news, which fuses newsprint and digital technology.

Press Gazette reports that Johnston Press is preparing to switch two of its broadsheet weeklies to tabloid format later this month.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-18 18:56


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