WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


March 2012

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The Wall Street Journal reports that Google will soon start selling its own Android-powered tablets. Google previously tried to capture the smartphone market with the Nexus One.

The Economist announced that it has officially reached 1 million fans on Facebook, journalism.co.uk reported.

POLITICO will be joining The Charlotte Observer in the creation of a daily newspaper that will cover the Democratic National Convention this September, according to its website. For the 2008 convention, POLITICO teamed up with The Denver Post and the St. Paul Pioneer Press.

The European Journalism Centre reported that a documentary titled 18DaysinEgypt, co-founded by American documentary filmmaker and journalist Jigar Mehta, features crowd-sourced material of the revolution in Egypt.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 17:33

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Most people (hopefully!) understand the consequences of putting something online: once you upload a compromising photo or tweet something controversial, it’s available for everyone to see. But when news stories emerge and social networking is the only readily available source of data, how much should journalists publish from private Facebook or Twitter accounts? Are certain things off-limits, or is it truly anything goes? In a recent article, Poynter examines some general guidelines of reporters for publishing such content.

Poynter highlights the confusing nature of Facebook’s privacy settings as one of the main sources of journalistic dispute. Since there are numerous levels of privacy, from closed groups to more open fan pages, journalists disagree about which privacy levels are acceptable to draw from, the article said.

And, though Facebook posts between friends may be considered in the public domain, “informed consent” to publish the material might not necessarily be implied by the user, Poynter said.

“Journalists are stepping into gray territory with no widely agreed-upon standards,” Nisha Chittal of Poynter wrote.

Twitter, however, seems to be a decidedly public platform, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-30 16:56

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Dan Connolly walked into the lion’s den on Friday, telling an international audience of sports editors, journalists and sports experts how they can work better with PR people.

Mr Connolly, Sports Public Relations Director for the marketing agency Havas Sports & Entertainment in the U.K., acknowledged that “It wouldn’t be healthy to act as if we’re on the same team.”

While public relations people are trying to get publicity for their brands, and media have a different agenda, there are ways to improve cooperation to mutual benefit, he says.

“Brands and organisations have stories they want to share, things they want to promote, and media organisations want the best possible content to give to their audiences. So good content is always going to give us a point in common,” he says.

For the rest of this story please see the conference blog

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-03-30 16:25

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Inspired by events in Tunisia and Egypt, the people of Bahrain took to the streets on 14 February, 2011 demanding change. More than a year after protests began on Pearl Roundabout, the epicentre of the Bahraini revolution, many argue that little has changed for the better. For the press, this sentiment is echoed most acutely.

A number of organisations have conducted missions and produced reports that investigate the state of freedom of expression in Bahrain, only to come up with one common result; things are getting worse. Journalists and human rights defenders have faced military trials, life imprisonment, torture, harassment, and in some cases even death whilst in the custody of the Bahraini authorities.

Author

Farah Wael

Date

2012-03-30 11:32

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Former editor and publisher of the Rocky Mountain News John Temple was named the new managing editor of The Washington Post, Politico reported. Temple will also serve as senior digital editor.

According to Adweek, Google announced a "microsurvey" option for publishers to use to earn advertising revenue instead of blocking online content with a paywall.

The Center for Investigative Reporting and The Bay Citizen of the San Francisco Bay area announced their merger on Tuesday, Poynter reported.

Journalism.co.uk explains how journalists can use the Timeline program for digital storytelling. Read all of the tips here.

Michael Wolff at the Guardian delves into the difficulties news organisations are having in generating mobile ad revenue.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 17:47

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Could there be new hope for print newspaper lovers? Consumer electronics company LG will launch a plastic electronic paper display (EPD) in Europe this April, Mashable reported.

The EPD is 6 inches in size, 0.7 mm thick, scratch-resistant and has a resolution of 1024 x 768, the article said. And, unlike technologies that use glass screens, such as tablets and e-books, LG's e-paper can be bent up to 40 degrees from the center, the article said.

According to Extreme Tech, the display uses e-ink, the technology used in e-readers such as Kindle and Nook. Using e-ink is especially beneficial to manufacturers, the article said.

“Unlike flexible OLED displays, which have been around for a while, e-ink displays are cheap to produce and can run for months on a small battery,” the article said.

ComputerWorld reported in November that both LG and Samsung debuted prototypes of flexible displays at an FPD International event in Japan. While LG’s e-paper used e-ink, which relies on surrounding light, Samsung’s version used OLED, a technology in which pixels generate light when charged, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 17:03

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Media companies are increasingly encouraged to engage with their audience via social media. But this basic engagement can just be a first step. In an ideal world, the members of that audience will also interact with each other, continuing the debate started by the news organisation, deepening the impact of news stories, and building loyalty around the media brand to make sure it survives in the future.

This is all very well, but how do you do it? Well, it’s not always easy, argued the panel on community building at the Social Media World Forum in London yesterday. 

Nick Reynolds, the public accountability executive for BBC Online, advised caution when building a community from scratch. “Just because you have a marketing budget to spend, don’t think that’s going to result in a community,” he said. Instead, he urged professionals to think about whether they’re appealing to a genuine interest group. Mark Coatney, director at Tumblr also emphasised that, whatever you do in terms of community building, it is important to have clear goals and to understand the motivations of the group that you’re trying to reach. When adding a new feature, ask yourself, “Would I do this? Why would I do this?” he advised.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-29 10:42

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The Boston Globe announced yesterday that it was following in the footsteps of other newspapers and launching an ePaper edition for online and print subscribers, according to boston.com. The ePaper version, which mirrors the format of the print paper, can be read on a laptop or downloaded as an app for smartphones and tablets, the article said.

The “replica edition” contains additional digital features such as page-turning, navigation scrolling and bookmarking, the article said. The new version also features a “text-to-speech” option, which can read selected articles or the entire newspaper aloud.

According to the description from the iTunes app store, users can choose a setting in which Apple Newsstand automatically downloads the paper daily, just like a print version would be delivered each day. The description also states that users can click on articles to access embedded links or share those articles on social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-29 09:47

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How has social media changed the news? It’s a question so big that it’s almost impossible to answer, but it’s one that a panel at the Social Media World Forum tried to get their teeth into today.

In a session titled “social media and the news” speakers picked out a few core areas in which social media has altered – and is continuing to alter – the way journalists work.

- Breaking news

Starting with the most obvious point, social media has revolutionised the way news can be broken and how fast it can be spread. Peter Bale, vice president and general manager of CNN, used the classic example of the way that reports of Osama Bin Laden’s death spread on Twitter to illustrate how quickly news can now move on social networks. Anthony Simon, senior digital campaigns manager for the UK Prime Minister's Office also pointed out that “it’s difficult to embargo stories for a long period of time” in the modern media world. Both sources and journalists have to adjust to this new reality of fast-moving news.

- The proliferation of sources

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-28 18:33

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Two Brazilian journalists, the owner of Costa Oeste newspaper Onei de Moura and radio reporter Divino Aparecido Carvalho, were shot and killed last weekend near the Paraguay border, The Guardian reports.

After having been purchased by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, The New Republic announced on its blog that new articles on the website will no longer be blocked by its paywall, according to the Atlantic Wire.

Steve Buttry of The Buttry Diary blog asked several engagement editors, or social media editors, to explain their roles in the newsroom and how they try reach their audiences. Read their responses here

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 17:42

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The Committee to Protect Journalists reported yesterday that two British journalists of Algerian origin were killed by Syrian forces in Darkoush on Monday, while a third was wounded.

The independent journalists, identified as Naseem Intriri and Walid Bledi, were in the process of filming a documentary about Syrians’ escape from the conflict to neighboring Turkey, the article said. The Syrian army fired at the home where the three journalists and other Syrian activists were seeking refuge, the article said.

Intiri and Bledi initially fled for safety, but were shot upon returning to the house to get equipment, the article said.

After tentatively reporting yesterday that the Syrian Revolution General Commission said two journalists were killed, The Guardian recently confirmed reports of the shooting, citing the CPJ and Spanish newspaper El Mundo.

The British Foreign Office is currently investigating reports of the attack, according to journalism.co.uk.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-28 16:58

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Which publications are read where? A collaboration between Forbes and Bitly analysed millions of clicks on Bitly shortened links shared on the Web to explore which news sources are read where across the US.

Bitly is a website which shortens URLs, making it easier to share them on the Web. It is widely used on Twitter for example, where saving space is crucial to get the most out of 140 characters. Bitly provides also tools to track links: by adding a + at the end of a link, it’s possible to see how many times the link was clicked on, Bitly explains.

The data collected for Forbes have been aggregated to form an interactive map showing America’s most influential news outlets.

As Forbes’ Jon Bruner explains, Bitly’s dataset consists of every click on every Bitly link on the Web mainly shared on social networks like Facebook or Twitter. For Forbes – Bitly said – they investigated how people consume news by looking at how people in different states differ in their preference for news sites.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-28 16:54

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To paywall or not to paywall? That seems to be the most prominent question in the sphere online news publishing these days. In the discussions on the topic, the lines appear to be clearly drawn: on the one side are newspapers such as the New York Times or the Financial Times, which charge for their online content either immediately or after accessing a certain number of articles. On the other side are papers such as the Guardian, which believe that an “open” approach, more akin to the nature of the Internet, will eventually yield solid revenue.

The drawback of this way of thinking about digital publishing is that it may put too much emphasis on the question of paywall, whereas a different angle could be more helpful. GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram makes this point in a recent article, arguing that rather than defining the relationship with their readers through money, newspapers should focus on the relationship they have with their readers. When developed more fully, this relationship would then form the basis that could be monetised.

What is important in creating and maintaining such relationships is the readers’ closer involvement in the papers’ functions, Ingram argues, citing comment moderation by readers and real-world events that active online community members would be invited to as examples.

Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2012-03-28 12:59

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Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London yesterday, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-28 10:11

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Do you want to improve your Twitter skiils? The USA Today College put together a list of nine Twitter "experts" who have their fingers on the pulse of modern journalism.

The American press is "complacent," "self-regarding" and "too up themselves" says Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre in an interview he gave to New Yorker's Lauren Collins, the Guardian reported. Read the whole interview on the New Yorker here.

Google announced its collaboration with the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory with the aim of helping "to preserve and digitize thousands of archival documents, photographs and videos about Nelson Mandela".

The Poynter Institute and the European Journalism Centre are collaborating on an new e-learning course on “Reporting & Writing About Development in the World” for 40 journalism students from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia, EJC announced.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-27 18:03

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With the rapid rise in popularity of the virtual pinboard Pinterest, newsrooms have been experimenting with ways to use the new platform to share their original content, according to Mediabistro’s 10,000 Words blog. Mediabistro examines how The Wall Street Journal and various other news outlets have been using Pinterest as a journalism tool.

The Pinterest platform consists of user-posted “pins,” or added images, which other users can then “like,” comment on, or “repin” to their own Pinterest account, according to the Pinterest website.

“Our goal is to connect everyone in the world through the 'things' they find interesting,” the website said. “With millions of new pins added every week, Pinterest is connecting people all over the world based on shared tastes and interests.”

Popular topics include style, home decorating, cooking and inspirational photos and quotes. Users can also create pinning “boards” focused on a specific topic.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-27 14:14

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Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger answered readers’ questions about open journalism in a live chat on the paper’s website this afternoon, following the paper’s ‘Open Weekend,’ which aimed to put the principle of open journalism fully into practice.

Rusbridger lists the paper’s ten principles of open journalism: essentially it is journalism which embraces information from others and enters into a dialogue with the wider world. 

The issues he addressed in the chat include:

Transparency

Rusbrider said that the paper does already give background data in the form of facts and figures in some cases so that readers can make their own judgments. But “we could, and should, do more, he continued. “I've always been keen on the idea of footnotes. Difficult in print, easier on the web. Ditto links.”

Paywalls and advertising

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-26 18:51

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A new story has surfaced in the on-going debate about how far media needs to go in its quest for journalist neutrality.

Jim Romenesko reports on his blog that Kevin Corrado, president and publisher of the Green Bay Press-Gazette has harshly criticized 25 journalists working for Gannett Wisconsin Media for signing a political petition, advocating the recall of Wisconsin governor Scott Walker.

Corrado writes in a column for the Press-Gazette that disciplinary measures are being taken against the reporters who signed the petition, on the grounds that signing the petition has compromised their journalistic impartiality. He states that what they did was “wrong” and the company is considering providing all its journalists with additional ethics training.

Corrado writes, “the principle at stake is our belief that journalists must exercise caution and not cause doubts about their neutrality, especially at a time when the media is under a microscope and our credibility is routinely challenged.”

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 18:04

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From an underplayed incident to a viral, racially-charged tragedy, the Trayvon Martin shooting has shocked Americans across the country. How did the case attract so much attention, so quickly? In an article chronicling the coverage, Poynter called attention to how the combination of social media and tradition media outlets has defined the story, and its key players, so far.

News of Martin’s killing, which occurred the night of February 26 in Sanford, Florida, was initially limited to a short report in the Orlando Sentinel, which attributed the death to an “altercation,” Poynter reports.

It was not until Martin’s father, Tracy Martin, held a press conference a week later that the media began to question the initial reports, Poynter said. The Sentinel published a second article on March 8 with many more details of the killing and the shooter, George Zimmerman, who has not yet been charged for the death, Poynter said. Zimmerman alleges that he acted in self-defense.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-26 17:58

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Index on Censorship is marking its 40th anniversary of with a special issue, including an article on freedom of speech by Aung San Suu Kyi, reports Roy Greenslade for The Guardian. Greenslade notes that Index is also making its complete archive available online for free for the next 40 days.

Knight Blog has published an entry about Mercer University’s Center for Collaborative Journalism. As part of Mercer’s program, students will learn reporting skills from experienced journalists, and journalists will learn digital expertise from the students. 

Journalism.co.uk writes that since The Guardian opened up an office in New York seven months ago, the paper’s digital readership in the US has grown from 15 million to just under 20 million users. 

An in-depth article in Foreign Policy magazine considers the pressures on the Pakistani media, both from repressive government policies and from a lack of internal self-regulation.

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-26 16:51

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Newspapers have until 4 May to submit an entry to the World Young Reader Prizes, the annual awards from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) that recognize success in engaging the young.

The awards in five categories - Editorial, Making the News, Newspapers in Education (NIE), Public Service, and Brand - will honor newspaper companies that have devised the best projects and activities during the past two years to promote newspaper reading and usage, on all platforms, among those under 25.

Two special categories for 2012 are “Enduring Excellence,” to honor young reader programmes that have continued delivering benefits for both the newspaper and the young for at least two years, and “The Natasa Prize for Printing Plants,” for a newspaper printing plant action that teaches the young about journalism.

Judges are looking for innovative strategies that produce measurable results, particularly those that can be adapted for use in other countries. Use of multiple platforms is particularly encouraged.

Entries for all categories require creating a PowerPoint presentation following prize guidelines. Full details and online registration can be found here .

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-26 11:13

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AOL plans to launch a new digital magazine, Huffington, for tablets, according to Forbes. The weekly magazine will feature a combination of original and aggregated Huffington Post content and will be free to readers.

Chris Hamilton talks to MediaBistro about his role as BBC News Social Media Editor, offers tips on handling breaking news via Twitter

A 1966 memo, written by former Daily Mail Editor Mike Randall and released by Jack Dyson on his blog, highlights journalistic ethics of the period, The Guardian reports

Boston University's College of Communication will hold its annual nonfiction conference, featuring 32 celebrated journalists who will discuss storytelling journalism, BU Today reports

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-23 18:17

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UK publishing group Extra Newspapers announced Wednesday that it will be launching its first three hyper-local newspapers for the towns of Corby, Wellingburough and Kettering in Northamptonshire, according to a press release.

Extra spent 14 months researching and developing the newspapers, which are “designed to appeal to the traditional newsprint reader as well as the younger, digital savvy readership,” the release said.

Each newspaper will begin circulation in April at 10,500 copies and will cost 50 pence apiece.

Editor Judith Halliday emphasized in the release that the communities themselves will be the focus of each publication.

“Extra aims to prove that small and local can be beautiful,” she said. “We will be right there on the corner with the local community—watching, reporting and sharing all the news.”

Members of the respective communities are invited to contribute news and opinions to the paper as well, the release said.

Managing Director Stuart Parker explained in the release that, before now, Corby did not have its own local newspaper.

The Corby Extra will give Corby what it wants most of all and that’s a voice across the community,” he said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-23 17:29

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In light of the removal of Chongqing party leader Bo Xilai from his position last week, the Chinese online community has been buzzing with rumors and government criticism—all without ever mentioning their political leaders by name, according to The Guardian.

Microbloggers have been using cryptic code words, ranging from Teletubbies to Instant Noodles, to keep comments about Bo’s dismissal and meetings of the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party from being blocked, The Guardian reports.

Internet users nicknamed Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao “Teletubby,” or tianxianbaobao as the show is called in China, the article said. Other codes include instant noodle brand Master Kong (Kang Shifu) for alleged Bo supporter Zhou Yongkang and “Tomato” (xihongshi) for Bo himself, the article said.

The blog Offbeat China also published a list of key words used by bloggers as well as sample blog posts that incorporated the codes, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-23 14:36


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