WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


October 2011

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Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi's controversial wiretapping bill continues to spark further protests from Italy's online community.

As reported earlier, the bill known as DDL Intercettazioni was initially designed to prevent newspapers publishing information obtained through wiretapped recordings, such recordings having caused significant trouble for the Italian PM after it was discovered he called Italy 'a shit country' and made crass insults about the German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The most contentious clause of the bill, paragraph 29, also proposed that should any blogger publish information deemed to be defamatory, the blogger would be forced to print a correction within 48 hours of publishing the offending entry else pay a fine of €12,000.

Unsurprisingly, the proposed legislation has caused outcry from the press and the blogging community, with demonstrations in Rome and journalists striking in protest.

Wikipedia has also joined the fight.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-06 14:15

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The Daily Mail is to hold an internal inquiry into why its Amanda Knox 'guilty' piece contained invented quotations and descriptions.

Charlie Beckett on why the media coverage of the Amanda Knox trial exposed so many journalistic errors.

The Pulitzer Center for crisis reporting is recruiting African journalists to participate in a collaborative reporting project based around reproductive health.

Will newspapers be an extinct species by 2040? UN intellectual property chief Francis Gurry seems to think so.

BBC News chief Peter Horrocks calls for the UK government to take action against Tehran, which has intimidated and arrested friends and relatives of BBC Persian staff.

Dark days for press freedom in Latin America: 12 journalists receive death threats.

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Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 19:31

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Apple's latest launch event was definitely disappointing for those Apple fans awaiting the elusive beast that is the iPhone 5 - but that doesn't mean that the tech giant's latest announcement, the iPhone 4S, was insignificant, as Mashable explains here.

The recent launch of lower price products, such as the Amazon Kindle Fire, which may prove a serious competitor to the iPad, and Aakash, the US-Indian produced tablet that will be sold to students in India for around $35, has prompted questions about whether Apple can maintain its position as tech-brand supreme. Will the iPhone 4S help in this mission?

Relevant developments for publishers include the fact that the device is more closely integrated with Twitter than ever before and also provides an offline reading mode in its Safari browser- something which may cause annoyance to publishers who rely on online advertising revenues. Newsstand - the cunningly named digital newsstand from Apple - will also be an integral part of the device.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 19:12

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Today, the French ministry of culture and communication launched season three of 'Mon Journal Offert' ('My Free Newspaper'), an initiative established in 2009 as part of a government bailout of the press, aimed at encouraging people between the ages of 18 and 24 to read daily newspapers in print. The scheme allows any citizen of France or one of its departments, aged between 18 and 24, the chance to claim a free daily newspaper - selected from a range of 61 titles - one day a week for a year.

Young French people have a limited period of time to take advantage of this offer - the window for subscription begins on October 5 and closes December 31, after which 220,000 young people will be able to receive a free daily newspaper. Successful applicants are selected on a first come, first served basis as demand always outstrips supply; in previous years close to 400,000 applications have been made, according to the ministry of culture's website.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 16:22

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Rural Media Network Pakistan delivers a WAN-IFRA sponsored award for press freedom to Pakistan's first female video journalist, Sadia Sehar Haideri.

Shine, Elizabeth Murdoch's television production company, sees profits fall before take over.

Tablet and smart-phone consumption habits: how the tablet is changing the way we use our smart-phones and why 11 pm is becoming peak traffic time for news sites.

Mashable's rise to power: from one-man job to techno-bog supreme. And it all began in a bedroom in Scotland...

The London-based Irish Post will be rescued by the publisher Loot, after public outcry at the possibility of its closure.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 19:31

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Occupy Wall Street: the American protest movement that seemed to have sprung from nowhere and may have been going nowhere - or so many people thought until Saturday October 1, when protesters marched across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City and 700 people were arrested.

Simply look at the events calendar on the movement's website and you will see that its members have a broad range of political goals and, consequently, the actions backed by Occupy Wall Street range from everything including 'slut walks' to anti-nuclear demonstrations. What their members all have in common is that they are "the 99% that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1%" Inspired by uprisings in the Arab World, this "leaderless resistance movement" has provided another example of how social media can create mass mobilization.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 18:32

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The trial of American student Amanda Knox has been the on-and-off focus of global media attention since 2007, when the murder of British student Meredith Kercher took place in the Italian city of Perugia. This latest trial is an appeal against a verdict given in 2009 that sentenced Knox to 26 years in jail for her alleged role in Kercher's murder. Knox's then boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, was also implicated in the crime and sentenced to 25 years.

Yesterday, the appeal verdict was delivered: not guilty. After four years in jail for Kercher's murder, Knox was released.

Naturally, the media were ready for the announcement. It's an old game, reporting the verdict of a big case. Gone are the days when newspapers would print two copies of their front page - one anticipating a guilty verdict and one in case the defendant were found not guilty - but the guessing, the preparation and the anticipation still remains. Now, in the age of instantaneous digital mobile news, the challenge is to be the news organisaion to break the story first - oh yes, and to be the one that publishes the correct information.


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Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 14:39

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As digital media grows and print revenue shrinks, papers around the world are struggling to find ways to make online news pay. One of the most obvious - and most controversial - solutions has been the paywall. But getting people to pay for content is no easy task if they feel they can the same thing for free elsewhere.

Bill Mitchell, Head of Entrepreneurial and International Programs at the Poynter Institute, offers his expert opinion here. He talks about how "charging today for something that was free yesterday is fundamentally a non-starter". Yet paywalls can work if papers invest in flexible systems, exploit their journalists' expertise in niche areas, and, crucially, offer readers their money's worth in terms of new value.

Mitchell will be speaking at the 18th World Editors Forum in Vienna about paid online content from the perspective of the newsroom.

WAN-IFRA: News organisations have different paywall systems, from The New York Times' metered paywall to the more or less straightforward paywall of The Times of London. What's the best model?

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Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-10-04 12:17

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Google's latest advertising strategy aims to imitate the good, old-fashioned Sunday newspaper print circular.

A bloggers dilemma - which platform should you choose? Poynter has a handy guide to teach you the pros and cons of Wordpress and Drupal.

Twitter-jacking: Thai P.M.'s Twitter account has hacked by her opponents, claiming: "If she can't even protect her own Twitter account, how can she protect the country? Think about it."

French newspaper group Les Echos has a new CEO: Francis Morel, the former head of Le Figaro.

Le Monde's use of data visualisation: this report from French data visualisation blog suggests the paper could do better...?

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-03 17:29

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Former England Captain Rio Ferdinand has lost his libel case in which he attempted to claim £50,000 in damages from The Sunday Mirror. The paper published an article in which 32-year-old interior designer Carly Storey revealed the 13-year long on-and-off affair she had with the footballer. Ferdinand argued that the story was an invasion of his privacy, however Justice Nicol ruled that the story was in fact in the public interest, considering the England Captain is, in effect, a national ambassador.

The British press is no stranger to stories of this nature: high profile footballer has an affair and the woman involved speaks out, often for quite a substantial fee.

There has long been debate over whether such cases are instances of disclosure of information in the public interest, or whether they are simply 'kiss and tell stories' that are simply of interest to the public - and which, therefore, sell papers.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-03 16:42


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