WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


August 2011

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For analysis of The Reuters Insititute of Journalism study on public money and the media, take a look at The Guardian.

The Associated Press alters its release deadlines to accommodate an ever more global audience. 3 A.M. deadlines, anyone?

Good news for local news: local sites see a 25% growth in traffic during 2011.

How your readers use Facebook: older readers are more likely to click through to an advertisement page, while younger audience members tend to use the 'like' button more.

Gannett and Yahoo have extended their ad deal to cover 19 Gannett's local TV stations.

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Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-31 18:33

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The Financial Times digital application has been removed from the iTunes App Store after Apple revised its policy to ensure that it could obtain 30% of all subscription fees purchased within the store itself.

As MacRumours reports, the company revised its pricing policy in the App Store Review Guidelines to include this paragraph:

"11.14 Apps can read or play approved content (specifically magazines, newspapers, books, audio, music, and video) that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app, as long as there is no button or external link in the app to purchase the approved content. Apple will not receive any portion of the revenues for approved content that is subscribed to or purchased outside of the app"

Essentially, this banns leading consumers away from pages inside an application to a company's own independent site, where the customer could purchase subscriptions. If companies did this, Apple wouldn't see any of that subscription money, as the transactions would not go though the Apple App Store.

The Financial Times is not happy with this arrangement.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-31 16:48

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CNN has taken a step towards boosting its personalised content by acquiring the online magazine Zite.

Zite offers consumers the chance to read content which is directly of interest to them, gathered from various sources around the web, in an advertisement free window on an iPad.

Increasingly, personalised content is becoming of more interest to major news outlets, such as CNN. Zite, whose application has been downloaded by 125,000 people, provides the news outlet with technology to "help CNN's websites and apps serve more personalized content, making our current digital services even better", as CNN's General Manager of Digital, KC Estenson stated in an interview with Mashable.

Zite, on the other hand, will not become simply a tool of dissemination of CNN's content. CNN will help Zite "do a wide variety of deals" with other media companies.

Initially, publishers were unwelcoming towards Zite and its ad-free aggregation. However, clearly this attitude has mellowed over time and large media groups are beginning to see the advantages of reader-targeted content.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-31 13:14

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For a round up of what Middle Eastern publications are making of the battle for Lybia, take a look at The Economist. Some are hailing a bright new future; others anticipate a grapple for resources with the west.

U.S. Spanish language media seems to be resisting the drop in circulation experienced by other U.S. media. The Pew Reseach Centre assesses the situation.

Southern Sudan introduces new media laws to prevent restrictions to journalism.

Can online adverts ever match the power of print publicity? Net News Check outlines the difficulties of offering consumers the same kind of savings power offered by print coupons.

Constant vigilance! Jack Shafer on why all journalists should always keep their eyes peeled for the next opportunity.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-30 17:50

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James Murdoch's woes may be many and varied, but one thing is certain: they aren't going to disappear anytime soon.

The New York State Controller Thomas DiNapoli has decided that a $27 million State Education Department deal with Wireless Generation, an affiliate of News Corp., will not go through. The company was to be employed to produce software designed to monitor student performance in tests. However, due to lobbying from teachers' unions and the multitude of unanswered questions about the Murdoch media empire's ethical standards, the controller has decided not to award the contract to the firm.

Hardly surprising, seeing as Murdoch father and son will both be facing a judicial inquiry in the British High Court. Lord Justice Leveson, who has been at the centre of many high profile cases in the past, will hear the pair give evidence under oath. As Christopher Hope of The Telegraph writes: "the prospect of courtroom evidence will increase the impression that the Leveson inquiry is an unofficial 'trial' of key players in the phone hacking scandal."

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-30 16:57

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Twitter - it 's constantly there to reassure you that the rest of the world exists and that everyone is talking to each other. All the time.

Records in constant communication are being set all the time. The MTV Video Music Awards ceremony played host to the most tweeted about moment of all time, when Beyoncé revealed her baby bump to the world, spawning 8,868 tweets per second. That's fast. That's more than Osama Bin Laden's death

Andy Carvin, a tweeter of legendary calibre, who recently issued 1200 tweets in one weekend, covering the uprising in Libya and the East Coast Earthquake, is merely one example of how journalists are glued to the micro-blogging site.

It's not merely personal choice; it's an industry standard.

When discussing his digital-first strategy, J. X. Paton said at The WAN IFRA International Newsroom Summit "Adding a new person or expense for every new Digital function is just putting more water into a sinking boat. You have to multi-task. And, again, you have to train your people to do so. If they can't learn you have to let them go and hire those who can." By this standard, journalists are expected to have one hand hovering over their smart phone at all times.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-30 13:45

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The New Zealand Press Assocation is to close after 132 years in business, as the New Zealand market becomes dominated by Australian media businesses.

What does it mean for the news industry to be in transition? Peter Preston speculates on the digital future of the industry.

Is this the shape of the future? Sustainable Journalism imagines some possible professional titles that may become commonplace in news organisations.

The NYT reports on a new study shows that shutting down social media and the Internet can turn unrest into action.

The post 9/11 decade: Poynter shows us the front pages that have defined an era.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-29 18:22

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Social networks have changed the world of news; in fact, it's hard to imagine journalism without them.

No one could have missed the reaction to Google + arriving on the scene and all the speculation about whether the giant that is Google would change our social media landscape.

As a new Pew Internet survey reveals, 50% of all American adults now use a social network compared to 5% six years ago, so clearly the significance of social media can't be underestimated. However, not all social networks are young, fresh and exciting anymore... So, at a time when the relationship between social media and the public seems to be nearing the end of the honeymoon period and signs of so-called 'social media fatigue' are starting to creep in, Google+ has provided a little something to stoke the fire.

Google+ continues to be a magnet for media attention, but of late the press has been shining the spotlight on it's 'real name policy'. Google effectively wants you to be you in order to use its social network, as Mashable reports.

So what does this mean for journalists? Well it might mean that if you like to keep your professional identity and your personal life separate in the online world, this could be an issue.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-29 17:03

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Scott Klein is Editor of News Applications at ProPublica, the New York-based non-profit organization dedicated to investigative journalism. He tells WAN-IFRA how 'a whole new ocean of investigation has become possible' now new technology is available to journalists.

Klein heads a team of programmers and journalists who create new software that allows users not just to read stories, but to interact with them and find out how national trends are relevant to their daily lives. Projects range from The Opportunity Gap, a database where users can compare how well states provide richer and poorer schools with the same access to advanced classes, to Dollars for Docs, a programme that readers can use to find whether their own doctor has been paid money by drug companies.

Klein will be speaking at the 18th World Editors Forum, from 12th - 15th October in Vienna, about how news organizations can look beyond traditional forms to create more interactive methods of story-telling.

WAN-IFRA: What are the most important things to bear in mind when designing a news application?

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Hannah Vinter

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2011-08-29 14:08

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'Hurricane' Irene, which eventually turned out to be a tropical storm, was a natural disaster that loved the spotlight. As Howard Kurz of The Daily Beast points out, the fact that a rare hurricane was poised to strike the East Coast base of many major news operations managed to draw news coverage in the US away from the ongoing struggle in Libya in favour of non-stop storm coverage.

There's nothing strange about this: whenever unexpected bad weather strikes a major city, the media is always on high alert providing constant updates for their concerned audience.

Irene, however, is particularly interesting as the coverage, both user-generated and professional, spanned so many platforms and even temporarily altered the business models of several news organisations. Was it a 'hurricane of hype,' asked Agence France-Presse?

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-29 13:20

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Does Slate magazine's recent redundancies indicate that the 'only online' model isn't viable?

Does Virgin's Project magazine show that the iPad-only format might be working?

Raymond Louw, chairperson of The South African Press Council, and the late Daniel Pearl, The Wall Street Journal's former South Asia Bureau Chief who was tragically murdered in 2002, have been made World Press Freedom Heroes by the International Press Institute.

Jay Rosen outlines why he thinks political coverage needs a rethink.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-26 18:40

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In case you had missed it, media is changing.

But you already knew that. You also know that the domain of the traditional journalist is being encroached upon by citizen journalists and amateur bloggers.

What everybody wants to know is: where do we go from here? How does the professional press stay 'professional' when the Internet and mobile technologies allows anyone to become a journalist? Should it even try to?

It would be a glib interpretation of a complex situation to divide the debate in to two camps: those who fully espouse new media and those who view it with a slight air of suspicion, as a source of unreliable information and low quality material.

According to The National Post, it would seem that Quebec's culture minister, Christine St-Pierre, is a member of the latter group, if it exists. Her recent proposals for defining professional journalism state 'the Internet is not yet a source of "original information that respects the journalistic method."' Is it really reasonable to trust 'traditional media' simply because they are traditional? The News of The World was a long running publication, with over a century of journalistic history, but it hardly seemed to support St-Pierre and Payette's so-called 'journalistic method'.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-26 17:32

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Many people would say that travel journalists are some of the luckiest people around; they get paid to go on holiday, right?

Well, maybe sometimes, but Peter Greenberg, in an article on Poynter, argues that this perception is based on the media industry's own undervaluation of travel journalism.

Greenberg is the travel editor for CBS News, hosts the radio programme Peter Greenberg Worldwide which is syndicated across America, and has won an Emmy for his work in journalism.

The problem, Greenberg says, is that he is the only well-known journalist in his field; in his article he lists a host of news organisations - NBC, ABC, CNN and FOX- who are all without travel correspondents.

The situation is little better in the UK. Many publications, The Guardian included, simply offers what appears to be a holiday guide; a useful and well written holiday guide, but not exactly news. The BBC does have a travel news section, but it focuses primarily on road works. Its main travel section is produced in partnership with Lonely Planet - so yet again, it is more of a guidebook than industry-specific news.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-26 13:58

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A study shows that there may not be much evidence to support UK government proposals to ban Twitter during times of social unrest, as Twitter was generally used to express reaction, not to incite it.

Steve Jobs resigns as Apple CEO, stating 'I could no longer meet my duties'. This may be related to increasingly frail health. Tim Cook has been named his successor, while Jobs will become Chairman of the Apple Board.

Women in media: Forbes' list of female forces to be reckoned with.

Ghost written opinion pieces: is it acceptable for the rich and famous to pay someone to write their opinions for them?

Russian police are getting ever closer to identifying the murderer of Anna Politikovskaya, the FT reports.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-25 19:06

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Corbis continues to expand its image collection by investing in the citizen photojournalism newswire Demotix.

The visual media provider, which was renowned for providing images for advertising and media strengthened its reputation as a source for entertainment journalists in July this year when it acquired Splash News, a leading provider of celebrity images.

Since then, Corbis has signed a cross distribution deal with The Associated Press, a world leading provider of professional current affairs photography.

Demotix, however, whilst it is also a renowned and award winning provider of current affairs photography, is a very different type of organisation. It is often defined as a 'citizen newswire', because while it does accept content form professionals, many of its contributors are semi-professionals or simply people on the street.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-25 18:29

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What to do when you have been given a plethora of official communiqués and you need to read each one of them to uncover a potential story?

The answer: crowdsource.

On Tuesday, WikiLeaks released a bumper crop of approximately 35,000 diplomatic cables between the U.S. and 20 other embassies and consulates.

The task of wading through them was daunting, yet by outsourcing this task to followers of WikiLeaks on Twitter, who collate their finds under the hash-tag #wlfind, new finds are gradually being broken via the micro-blogging site.

The list of contacts on WikiLeaks' online data base shows messages between the UK, Austria, Brussels, Spain, a host of African nations, Vietnam, Iraq and Lebanon, to name a few.

So what are the advantages to crowd-sourcing tasks like this?

Obviously, systematically sorting through such a database has its challenges: for instance, where to start?

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-25 16:24

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While Steve Jobs's resignation as the CEO of Apple sent major shockwaves throughout the news media, there was also another statement yesterday that caused tremors in the media world: Jim Romenesko's announcement that he was to retire as a Poynter Institute's full-time blogger.

The departure doesn't mean that Romenesko's career as a media journalist is to come to an end, Poynter noted, as he will continue a part-time Poynter employee as from 2 January 2012. As part of the new arrangement Romenesko will also launch a personal website, jimromenesko.com, in January.

Romenesko's significance as a media blogger was apparent in the wave of reactions that followed the news of his semi-retirement. "Jim & a few others inspired me to start @TVNewser--& to treat aggregation as journalism," The New York Times's media reporter Brian Stelter tweeted. Journalism professor Jay Rosen called Romenesko "The man who taught much of American journalism what 'blog' and 'aggregation' are." Poynter has a Storified selection of people's responses.

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Teemu Henriksson

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2011-08-25 14:15

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Education, along with health and taxes, is a principal public concern; politicians win elections because of it, and therefore it's vital that newspapers provide good coverage of it.

Both The Guardian and The New York Times have launched crowd-sourcing projects on their websites, which intend to provide readers with information relating to the quality of schools.

As it is GCSE results day in the UK, The Guardian has appealed to teachers on its website to fill in a simple online form, which will then allow them to map the exam results of schools across the country.

Parents in the U.K. are fairly well informed about the exam results produced in their area, as official league tables, which rank local schools based on exam performance, have been widely available and The Department for Education makes performance tables form as far back as 1994 available to the public on its website.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-25 13:14

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Journalists in Denmark have been doing some pioneering work in citizen sports coverage.

As PBS Idealab reports, The Danish School of Media and Journalism asked 150 citizens to become journalists and follow the Under 21 Football Championship;

The participants gave real time reports via Twitter, collating them under the hashtag #U21aarhus. They also used a specially designed iPhone Application, produced by Widgetbox. The resulting reports were then curated and presented as a Storify page to clearly display the information.

Sports coverage is set to become an ever more interactive experience, as including social media and text messages from is increasingly common in sports T.V. programming, but it's one step further to have the reports generated by the fans themselves.

Source: PBS Idea Lab

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-24 18:53

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How do you 'Like ' this? Le Monde reports that a German federal state has ruled the 'like' button to be illegal, as Facebook can trace where users have clicked and can use this to amass personal data. Facebook claims that the site does not contravene European Law and that users have complete control of their data.

What the public really thinks about phone hacking: a Frontline Club survey has revealed that the British public believe the practice of phone-hacking was not simply confined to The News of The World.

Disinformation and confusion: The New York Times compares the current mass of contradictory information in Libya to the confusion after the fall of Saddam Hussein.

Print v Online: Why old-fashioned paper and print beats digital. Slate investigates.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-24 18:02

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The online reaction to the rebellion in Libya has been huge; and even if you don't follow him on Twitter, you will probably have heard about Andy Carvin's record total of 1,200 tweets over the weekend, documenting both the Libya situation and the earthquake on the East Coast of the U.S.A.

Tweets from officials and from foreign correspondents have all been standard components of many live blogs, helping to keep people all over the globe informed.

Yet again, social media has proved essential in forming both journalists' and the public's understanding of a dramatic and rapidly unfolding political situation.

In recognition of the power of social media, Al Jazeera has now decided to dedicate large amounts of airtime to news brought directly and exclusively from Twitter, according to The International Journalists Network.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-24 16:55

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As more and more news sites fly or die based on their page view numbers, there is an understandable interest in the business in services and social networks that drive traffic to news websites. So when StumbleUpon's founder Garrett Camp claimed that his site drives more than half of all social media referral traffic in the US, it was expectable that the announcement made waves in the web news world.

Although those numbers were plausibly contested by Forbes's Jeff Bercovici, there is no denying of the fact that StumbleUpon, a service that helps users discover web pages based on their interests and other users' recommendations, is becoming an important player in the web's link economy and one that web publishers shouldn't overlook.

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Teemu Henriksson

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2011-08-24 14:06

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Are public media subsidies fair? A recent study by The Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism has tallied up the amount of public money that either directly or indirectly subsidises media in the U.K., Finland, France, Germany, Italy and the US.

Unfortunately, the study discovered that strategies for funding news organisations have not changed to accommodate the developments of he digital age.

Finland gave the most public money, per capita, to support the media - around £46 a year per head via indirect subsidies, such as tax and VAT exemptions - and France gave the most in terms of direct public funding to media, through initiatives such as the 'My Free Newspaper' scheme, donating around £5 per capita. Germany was found to be the nation that invested the most in public service broadcasting.

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Katherine Travers

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2011-08-24 13:45

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As Editor of The Independent in the U.K. for 13 years, Simon Kelner oversaw this quality national daily during a period of incredible change in the industry. Although he stepped down from his daily duties as Editor in July, passing the torch to Chris Blackhurst, Kelner's legacy remains.

In 2003 he oversaw the redesign of the paper in compact form, an innovation so successful that other major British dailies followed suit. And last year he presided over the launch of i, a lower-priced digest of stories from The Independent targeted at on-the-go readers.

Kelner is due to speak at the World Editors Forum in Vienna (12-15 October) about i and its success so far.

WAN-IFRA: i was launched last October. Nine months on, how would you rate its success?

KELNER: It's been a tremendous success. The circulation sales followed the normal trajectory of a launch - very high at the start and then slowly came down to a very healthy level. But then we came back at the start of this year with a big advertising campaign and sales have continued to grow ever since then. Now we're selling around about 180,000 a day.

WAN-IFRA: Do you think having smaller, cheaper editions that synthesize the news is something that will catch on with other dailies?

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Hannah Vinter

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2011-08-24 13:26


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