WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 23.01.2018


July 2011

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The Pearson group released official sales figures for The Financial Times today, showing a 34% rise in digital circulation in the first six months of this year, as Journalism.com reports.

This boost in digital sales comes primarily from iPad app downloads, which have apparently drawn in 230,000 new users.

However, it is not merely the iPad that has caused the FT's digital sector to grow. Access to online content via the free website registration process has also grown, having reached a total of 3.7 million subscribers, an increase of 49%.

Although Pearson's main source of income is from its educational publications and Penguin publishing, The Financial Times saw its operating profit reach £132 million for the first half of the year.

The Press Gazette reports that, according to the Pearson group, these results are proof that the paper can survive in an increasingly challenging market: "At the FT Group, the changes we have made to the business model and mix mean we are well placed to grow even in tough markets for print circulation and advertising. We expect digital subscriptions, now the engine of the FT Group's growth, to continue to build steadily".

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-29 16:50

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After a false rumour spread on Twitter about Piers Morgan having been suspended from CNN because of phone-hacking connections, many commentators weighed in on whether reporters should tweet unconfirmed rumours. Reuter's Felix Salmon thought that individual journalists should be allowed to treat Twitter as a virtual newsroom, and to share rumours with their contacts; American Journalism Review disagreed.

The Economist launched an iPhone app version of its World in Figures book series. MinOnline reviewed the app, saying that its interface succeeded in providing different ways of accessing the trove of information about 190 countries. However, the app's search function could be more flexible, it said.

GigaOm reported on a new study that, among other topics, looked into at what time of the day people use mobile apps. The most popular times are the late afternoon (4pm to 6pm) and the evening (9pm to 11pm), according to the study. However, users are most engaged with ads within apps in the morning, from 8am to 11am.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-29 16:47

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What's the one service your newsroom needs so badly that your company would pay through the nose to get it?

Would that service happen to be Web analytics?

The company behind the popular analytics site Chartbeat certainly hopes so. Poynter reported on the organization's related program, Newsbeat, designed to provide a wealth of information about your web traffic; telling you - in real time - which topics are trending, which stories are being shared and via which social media.

The service is priced at $199 (and upwards) per month.

This definitely seems steep in comparison to the price tag for Chartbeat, as even an XXL package, meaning a package that is designed to analyse 15,000 concurrent page views, only comes to $149.95 per month. Starbucks, The Onion and Electronic Arts all seem to think that this fee is value for money.

So why is Newsbeat different? More importantly, why does that make it so much more expensive? The Newsbeat site explains:

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-29 14:03

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Sports Illustrated has dared to tread where few other publications would; as part of its all-access subscription strategy, it has decided to design multiple digital editions of its magazine for various different tablet computers every week, reports Mashable.com.

This, as any digital editor will tell you, is a true design feat.

Why are they bothering? The editor of Sports Illustrated explained to Mashable: "We're placing bets across the table, because we don't know where we're going to be in 18 months. But [other tablet platforms] are going to grow".

It seems that Sports Illustrated has attempted to spread-bet the tablet market, whereas other major publishers have chosen to do otherwise. Will the extra hard work pay off? Only time will tell.

Source: Mashable.com

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-28 18:33

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Want to combine all your social networks on one page? Add Twitter and Facebook feeds into your Google + account, courtesy of Chromestory.com.

On the subject of Google+, Mashable reports that Google+ traffic is dropping, although not dramatically.

The New York Times has released a list of words that appeared in its articles that were most frequently looked up using the in built dictionary feature on the website. No. 1 most obscure word: panegyric.

GigaOm argues that the most important feature of any news site is not aesthetics, it's social media.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-28 18:16

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This year the Knight-Batten prize for innovation in journalism went to Storify. Editors Weblog has been keeping a close eye on the rise of such multimedia story telling tools and watching Storify develop as a storytelling medium in action.

Quoting judge Amy Webb in the official press release, The Knight Foundation blog today reported "In Storify, we see a journalism tool that truly solves a newsroom problem and also inspires others to challenge the way they've been telling stories."

The regional not-for-profit Texas Tribune received a special distinction, along with West Africa Democracy radio which provides news and current affairs for 13 African nations, online community organizer Andy Carvin, and the website Bloomberg Government.

Notably, The Guardian Data Store was one of the only projects by a major print-published National Newspaper to receive any credit, coming away with an honorable mention.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-28 13:16

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More and more news websites give their readers badges as awards for engagement with the site. Poynter discussed the use of badges, noting that they can help a news organisation define and grow its relationship with its readers.

David Cameron gets on board with a cause as he guest edits The Big Issue, featuring an article written by Bill Gates and an interview with Michele Obama.

As Thompson-Reuters stock takes a dip, the Thompson family has called for greater action and greater results.

As press regulation is the topic du jour, here's an example of how regulation can stop journalists in their tracks. Scottish press has found existing data laws an impediment to their investigative journalism.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-27 19:24

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Every journalist knows that language is the key their craft. However, it is so often too easy to get caught in the inertia of producing story after story and forget that sometimes it is necessary to go back to basics and examine the building blocks of any story: words.

Editor and Publisher reported that The New York Times has offended the families of some murder victims through injudicious use of language which they feel degrades their departed relatives.

A suspected serial killer recently murdered a series of women in the state of New York. The murderer's modus operandi involved finding women who advertised as escorts on the website Craigslist and then taking their lives.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-27 18:33

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It is a truth universally lamented in the news industry, but no one can deny the fact that sales of printed newspapers are declining, with digital formats moving in to fill the space. If the younger generation, like their parents, begin reading news from online sources, where does that leave the future of print?

As inma.org reported, one Austrian newspaper, Kleine Zeitung, has seen this forthcoming challenge and launched a pre-emptive strike: they have launched Kleine Kinderzeitung, a newspaper specifically designed for children.

There are already some very successful models for engaging children in current affairs and news in general. Take for instance the long-running BBC institution that is Newsround. The program was first broadcast in 1972, initially known as 'John Craven's Newsround', after its longstanding presenter and editor, the show continues to be aired today.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-27 13:40

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There is an increasing number of new news outfits that depend greatly on the support of their communities. It is thus not surprising that many are turning into ways of engaging with their audience directly through community events. Such happenings aren't only a way to create closer ties with readers - they can also serve as an additional revenue source.

Nieman Journalism Lab reported on such efforts at The Texas Tribune. The Tribune has already hosted over 60 events, and in September it will put on a festival, presenting "debate, discussion and dialogue" on subjects that affect people in Texas. Evan Smith, The Tribune's chief editor and executive, said that such events are not only about journalism - although that is an important aspect of them as well - but they are also a way to produce revenue, from sold tickets and sponsorships.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

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2011-07-27 13:31

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From Twitter and Facebook, to crowdsourcing and gathering readers' photos, to community events: newspapers now have abundant ways to interact with their readers online. The World Editors Forum, to be held in Vienna from 12 to 15 October next, will focus on the new tools of social media to help editors build communities around their newspapers.

The annual conference, which runs concurrently to the World Newspaper Congress, will also offer a "Facebook for Journalists" workshop in which Facebook representatives will provide tips and advice on how Facebook can be better used by newsrooms, both to find sources and reach a larger audience.

The WEF session on building communities will feature Jim Brady, Head of Project Thunderdome, the Journal Register Company's initiative to engage audience and creating content across all platforms and geographies, Matthew Eltringham, Editor of the BBC College of Journalism website, Anette Novak, Editor-in-Chief of Norran in Sweden, and other speakers to be announced.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

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2011-07-27 11:23

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News & Tech reported on The Honolulu Star-Advertiser's recent decision to start charging for its website's content. As from 3rd August, the newspaper will charge $19,95 a month for both digital and print access, and it has yet to decide the price of digital subscription. The paper will also launch a new digital edition for the iPad, iPhone and ereaders.

Flipboard, an app that turns Twitter and Facebook feeds into an app-like reading experience, is introducing advertising: the company is launching a partnership with publishers such as Conde Nast to push their ads into the Flipboard app, GigaOm reported. Selected brands will appear in full-page ads as part of publishers' content.

According to paidContent's calculations, the revenue of Mail Online, the second most visited newspaper site in the world, are growing, but not as fast as its audience numbers are. Mail Online and Metro.co.uk are making 51 percent more revenue than last year, but over the same period, Mail Online's monthly unique users went up 82 percent.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

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2011-07-26 17:40

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The News of the World phone hacking scandal has ignited an international discussion on ethics in journalism. News organisations are both distancing themselves from News International's tactics and taking a second look at their own policies. In light of recent phone hacking allegations by a former employee, Trinity Mirror announced today that it will be conducting a review of editorial procedures and controls across its publications.

The investigation is due in large part to James Hipwell, who worked at The Daily Mirror from 1998 to 2000. In an interview with The Independent, Hipwell said phone hacking was "endemic" and "seen as a bit of a wheeze". This revelation, as well as his statement that he was willing to testify to authorities, was the first concrete accusation of phone hacking at a publication outside of News International. If the investigation brings back evidence supporting his claim when it concludes in September, this could blow the lid off of the scandal, pulling the entire tabloid industry in an uncomfortable position.

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Author

Florence Pichon

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2011-07-26 16:43

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When BBC reporter Laura Kuenssberg changed jobs from chief political correspondent for the BBC to the business editor of ITV, she changed her Twitter account to match her new job title. The change would have been a routine usage of social media, if it had not been for one thing - she took her 60,000 followers to the new account.

The situation poses interesting questions about content ownership, social media, and brand journalism. On a professional account, content must conform to the organisation's social media policy. However, Poynter explained that the question of what to do with an account after the journalist leaves has not yet been directly addressed in these guides.

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Author

Florence Pichon

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2011-07-26 13:40

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Check out who The Guardian considers to be the 100 most powerful people in media at the moment.

If you needed yet more proof as to just how incendiary Twitter can be, let Jeff Jarvis show you, with his rebellious new hash-tag.

Are you designing your digital apps with the right mindset? Khoi Vinh tells us exactly what is wrong with how Condé Nast design their digital media products.

Google launches a new publication, aimed at informing digital advertisers, the first edition of which will be released out as a hardback book with interactive tactile elements.

After having portions of his book, The Insider, quoted during the Parliamentary Inquiry into phone hacking, the scandal is now threatening to envelop Piers Morgan. Now a presenter on CNN, legal action may be looming for the self-made media man.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-25 19:31

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In an industry without many top women editors, the news that Georgina Henry will be taking over digital operations at the Guardian may be a small sign of a changing newspaper culture.

According to The Guardian, Henry will be responsible for all aspects of the Guardian.co.uk except news. She is no stranger to the publication, as she is coming from her spot as the head of culture at The Guardian and Observer. In 2008, she helped revamp the "Comment is Free" section of the website.

Her predecessor, Janine Gibson, will be moving to head the Guardian's digital operation in the U.S. She will lead a team based in New York. Earlier estimates stated that the newspaper hoped to have the U.S. site up and running by September.

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Author

Florence Pichon

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2011-07-25 18:48

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As more and more efforts to provide news with a hyperlocal approach materialise, a pattern seems to be emerging. On the one hand, there are websites and newspapers that have sprung up from more or less local circumstances and that operate on a modest budget. On the other, there are big endeavours that attempt to cover several communities, AOL's Patch being the most notable example.

The Guardian discussed this pattern, noting that there seems to be another pattern when it comes to hyperlocal failures and successes. Using the Chingford Times as an example, it argued that small hyperlocal efforts done bottom-up have the best chance of succeeding. The Chingford Times, a fortnightly newspaper, belongs to Tindle Newspaper Group and costs £0.30 an issue. Although both the Chingford Times and Patch are in the hyperlocal news business, a quick comparison of numbers reveals how different they are from one another. The latter requires $120 million (£74 million) investment every year - compared to this, the Chingford Times's budget is miniscule, with the paper's profit per issue being currently at £2,000.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

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2011-07-25 17:56

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Reporting a tragedy of any magnitude is a test of any journalist or news organisation. Unfortunately, recent days have produced a string of grievous events which pose great challenges to journalists who are traditionally tasked with informing the public.

However, as everyone knows, the dynamic in the newsroom has changed. The audience can now inform journalists, who then distribute information more widely, informing a wider audience in their turn. This process of audience participation in generating news widely occurs through social media. The death of singer Amy Winehouse and the recent bombings and shooting in Norway have both been the subject of vast discussion via social media.

How should journalists respond to this mass of information and turn it into a story? As previously reported, the website Storify is one method via which journalists can collate and create a narrative, gathering information from several sources. In essence, this website provides a means of editing, or rather curating, information gathered from sites like Facebook, Flickr and particularly, from Twitter. This kind of collection of participatory social media is often referred to as 'crowd sourcing'.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-25 16:43

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Rather than quietly submit to a libel ruling restricting press freedom, the Ecuadorian paper El Universo published a near blank front page last week. CNN reported that the white space filled all but the bottom of the paper, where the paper published an Ayn Rand quote that said, in part, "When you see corruption being rewarded and honesty becoming a self-sacrifice, you may know that your society is doomed."

The blank page followed a judge's decision to sentence editorial page editor Emilio Palacio to three years in jail for writing an editorial criticizing the president Rafael Correa. According to The Miami Herald, the offending article called Correa a dictator.

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Florence Pichon

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2011-07-25 16:17

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The storm around News Corp. shows no signs of subsiding. After Tuesday's parliamentary hearing, James Murdoch has been accused of misleading MPs, The Guardian reported. If true, this greatly undermines the corporation's assurances of transparency, the paper noted. Moreover, the corporation could soon be in crisis in America as well, as the US Justice Department is preparing subpoenas as part of preliminary investigations into the corporation, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Ecuador, three executives and a former columnist of El Universo were sentenced to three years in prison for libelling President Rafael Correa. They were also fined a total of $30 million, and the newspaper was given an additional $10 million fine. According to the BBC, press freedom groups have criticised the case as part of an effort to muzzle the Ecuadorean media.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

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2011-07-22 19:30

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The battle of the social networks is raging and as the new guy in town Google + is getting all the attention. With a startlingly high rate of early adoption - almost 20 million users barely a month into operation, as recently reported - Google + is definitely the social network of the moment.

Social networking has become an indispensable weapon in the journalist's arsenal. It is a tool ideally suited to the rapid gathering and sharing of information, in addition to engaging not only with colleagues but with the public as well.

As Google steals the spotlight, however, questions are being asked about what will happen to its competitors.

Obviously, Facebook and Twitter are not going to disappear overnight. Both have huge followings, Facebook has 750 million active users, according to its statistics page and twitter passed the 200 million user mark this spring. Yet it is undeniable that these companies will feel compelled to respond to the growing popularity of Google +.

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Author

Katherine Travers

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2011-07-22 18:57

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The New York Times Company, the publisher of the New York Times, released its results for the second quarter of 2011 yesterday. It announced overall operating losses of $114.1 million in the quarter, compared with operating profit of $60.8 in the same period of 2010. The company blamed "deprecation, amortization, severance" and other special items without which it would have posted an operating profit of $82.9 million.

As the Times launched its digital subscriptions in March, the announcement's details relating to the newspaper's paywall were particularly interesting. The Times ended the second quarter with 281,000 digital subscribers. Of those, 224,000 were subscribers to the newspaper's digital subscription packages, the remaining 57,000 being paid digital subscribers to e-readers and replica editions.

Overall, the company's revenues went down 2.2 percent. Advertising revenues declined 4.0 percent, but digital advertising revenues actually rose 2.6 percent, partially offsetting a 6.4 percent decrease in print advertising.

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Author

Teemu Henriksson

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2011-07-22 16:47

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Given the present climate, the British Press Complaints Commission seems to be something of an endangered species. However, there are still certain members of the media who are rallying for its continued existence.

U.K. Media Lawyer Tony Jaffa wrote a piece for Holdthefrontpage.co.uk, which the Editors' Weblog reported on yesterday, arguing the merits of the PCC.

Now Nigel Pickover , editor of The Ipswich Evening Star, has made a public declaration of support in favour of the PCC. It seems that, much like Tony Jaffa, Pickover fears that changed to the regulatory system would damage regional publications.

Speaking to Holdthefrontpage.co.uk, Nigel Pickover explained:

"I believe the PCC has had a really bad press in recent days, undeservedly so, and I am happy to leap to its defence.

"I think there does need to be a new body, with toughened up regulatory powers, but for the national newspaper industry."

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Katherine Travers

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2011-07-22 13:59

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The Associated Press announced that it would start offering additional credit to other news organisations when it picks up their stories. In addition to offering a link to the news organisation's home page, as it has done before, AP will start including a direct link to the actual story.

Journalists are using social media more and more to interact with their readers: Roy Greenslade reported on the third Broadgate Mainland digital trends survey, which found that 81 percent of the respondents engage on a regular basis with their digital readers.

Ellie Behling discussed the metrics that are being used to measure the effectiveness of tablet advertising. Although reading on tablets is a different experience from print, traditional print metrics such as subscriptions to digital editions are still commonly used.

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Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-07-21 18:38


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