WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 31.10.2014


May 2011

The International Academy of Journalism, or Intajour, founded by Bertelsmann last year has officially opened to applications, the company announced in a press release.

The ten-month "Journalism in the Digital World" course, aimed at journalists from countries with limited or threatened press freedom, is inviting journalists from around the world to apply. Twelve students will be trained in the subjects of "Investigative research on the internet," "Journalistic forms of presentation on the internet," "Technical production of web content," "Media ethics" and "Economic fundamentals of online journalism." The program begins on August 29, 2011 and consists of attendance phases in Hamburg, Cologne and Berlin as well as two intensive e-learning phases, the press release specified. The deadline is June 15.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-05-12 10:23

The Berkman Center plans on relaunching Media Cloud, a platform that shows the trending topics of journalism, reported Ethan Zuckerman. 50,000 English-language articles a day are used to pick up on the top words. It will chart what the media is paying attention to and focusing on the most.

Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas announced that reports show violence in the Latin American press is still a major issue. It is the second most lethal area in the world for journalists. 31 journalists were killed in 2010 alone.

Be careful what you say online... Twitter can be dangerous for tweeters unwilling to edit. Both celebrities and journalists have suffered and even lost their jobs from impulsive tweets. Slate's Jack Shafer delves into what gets people in trouble.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-05-11 19:15

UK libel laws - and their reform - are again coming into the limelight.

Alan Rusbridger, editor in chief of the Guardian, gave a lecture at London's City University where he discussed the road of the libel reform, highlighting the differing legal systems in the UK and US.

As the Guardian reported, Rusbridger cited the example of Wikileaks. The paper decided to partner with the New York Times in publishing the cables because it was scared of being prevented to do so by the British courts - being sued or injuncted - if it attempted to go forth alone.

"It seemed a good idea to harness the whole exercise to a country with extremely robust media laws rather than risk it all on the quicksands of the British legal system", he said.

Libel and privacy laws have recently made the front pages after some revelations were posted on Twitter about celebrities who were alleged to have taken out privacy injunctions to prevent embarrassing stories being published in the press.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-11 19:06

Expansion is in the air. The Guardian and Mail Online have been expanding into the US market for the past year, and the Huffington Post recently announced its expansion plans in the UK. Joining these publications, Forbes will soon launch a European edition of its magazine, reported the Guardian. The publication will be available bi-weekly in 11 countries. A European version of the site is already up and running.

Its first print run will be 20,000 English-version copies, which will be distributed to business executives. Copies will also be available on newsstands from around €5 to €7, with prices varying in different countries. 25 to 30 Europe-based contributors will be hired for the venture.

Forbes was among the first media companies to focus on digital media. As a result, the company's digital portion has been profitable since 2000. It currently boasts a 50:50 profit. With 20 million visitors a month, around 2 million are in Europe, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-05-11 18:23

Daily Telegraph's reporters were wrong to use subterfuge to secretly record conversations with Liberal Democrats MPs during constituency surgeries last December, the UK Press Complaints Commission has ruled. The PCC is upholding the complaint against the paper raised by Liberal Democrat president Tim Farron, Journalism.co.uk reported.

Last December two undercover reporters secretly recorded MPs including business secretary Vince Cable, who at that time was charged with taking the final decision on News Corp's bid to take full control over BskyB. Cable was recorded saying that he had "declared war on Mr Murdoch".

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-11 14:38

The number of women reading newspapers has steadily grown over the years. They have become "the fastest-growing, most advertised attractive audience in town." A study from ComScore noted, "They're embracing the internet in a way that men are not." A new survey by Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism shows that they also make up the majority of readers for 8 out of the top 25 news sites.

The 8 websites are (in order from highest percentage to lowest) Topix, Aol News, Examiner.com, Bing News, Yahoo, MSNBC, ABC News, and Huffington Post. Poynter posted a chart of the numbers here.

Many of the top sites like Aol News, Bing, and Yahoo are multi-service providers. Also at the top were local news aggregators Topix and Examiner.com. Topix had the highest different in percentages, at 56.2 percent female and 43.8 percent male readership. Business sites, such as Reuters and the Wall Street Journal, tended to be more male-dominated. The sites received 63.7% and 60.9% male readership respectively.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-05-11 14:20

Tumblr launched a "share on Tumblr" botton, which allows publishers to add a button encouraging users to share their content on Tumblr (just paste the javascript tag into your source code), TechCrunch reported.

According to data released by the OJD, the organization for the control and the diffusion of news media, Le Parisien appeared to lead the ranking of the French regional newspapers' websites, with 22 million unique users, as reported by Journalismes.info. It is followed by Ouest-France and Sud-Ouest, with, respectively, 8.7 million and 4.6 million visitors.

In the eyes of Europe, Turkey's jailing of journalists and limits on Internet access raise serious questions about freedom of the press as the country's entry into the EU remains in doubt, Hurriyet (via WorldCrunch) reported.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-10 19:51

Longreads has gone a long way during its two-year history. It began as a Twitter profile and got a website only last October. Now, Longreads is making further use of its active community of 23,000 Twitter followers, TechCrunch reported.

The service posts links to new, long articles and stories (typically between 1,500 and 30,000 words) every day, making it easy to find substantial reading. The site's new area, "Community Picks," features most tweeted about Longreads articles. This adds a new way to finding reading material, as previously Longreads's suggestions were picked by editors.

#longreads hashtag, which readers use to suggest articles, is now also used for creating member profiles. All the #longreads links a member has tweeted show up on a profile page, making it possible to observe what others are reading.

"We hope to feature these individual tastes and continue to serve as a discovery engine for great storytelling and outstanding curators," Mark Armstrong, Longreads founder, said.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-10 19:31

The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism has published a new report on digital news economics, which highlighted how the relationship between content and advertising is changing, and what this means for the news business. The report comes just after the Pew Research Center's report on how people navigate the digital news environment

The main aim of Columbia's research was to find out what kinds of digitally based journalism the US commercial market is likely to support, and how.

The definition of digital journalism is broad: it includes online phenomenon (the Internet and computers) as well as mobile devices like phones and tablets.

Amongst much interesting analysis - the report is 146 pages long and is divided in 9 chapters - one part is devoted to the relationship between the news industry and the advertising market.

Felix Salmon pointed this out on his Reuters' blog. He quotes a passage of the report saying:

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-10 18:44

WAN-IFRA is hosting its third international conference on newspaper and magazine design next Thursday, 19 May, in Paris.

Whether in print, on the web or any other digital platform, newspaper design can give added value to editorial content. The objective of this conference is to show to participants "best practices" in creativity, originality, but also efficiency.

Topics include:
- Digital design
- Combining high-quality design with interesting content
- Show more than tell
- Best practices in Iberian newspapers design

Please see here for more details and here for registration.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-05-10 17:24

Profitability and finding a sustainable economic way for newspaper in the digital world is probably if the not the main, at least one of the main challenges facing the news industry today.

The whole picture can be seen by different perspectives: how to combine print and digital formats; which approach to follow online - free of charge, relying on advertising or putting content behind a paywall accessible through subscriptions; how to make money from digital devices, such as tablets and smartphones.
Optimists and pessimists bounce the ball between them and the most pessimists even argue that online news will never equal newspapers revenue.

"Can newspapers apps ever make a profit?", wonders Stephen Glover on the Independent. Apart from different subscription packages offered by different newspapers - the Daily Telegraph launched its new paid-for iPad app last week for example - one of the most controversial issues is the relationship between publishers and Apple.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-10 13:48

Guardian's Roy Greenslade reported that the Middleton family raised a complaint to the PCC over some five year old pictures showing Prince William's wife Kate, her sister Pippa and their mother wearing bikini, published by two Sunday newspapers - the Mail on Sunday and News of the World. "They are expected to argue that publication of these five-year-old images breaches the editors' code of practice by invading the privacy of the Middleton daughters and their mother", the article said.

According to AP (via ABC News) Israel's Communications Ministry says Israel's Arab minority will soon have its own Arabic language TV station for the first time. The ministry recently granted the station the first license for an independent Arab broadcaster. The ministry said Sunday that Hala TV will begin broadcasting in about three months.

Frédéric Filloux's Monday Note reflected on lessons that could be learned from coverage of Bin Laden's death, which has become a new reference point.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-09 19:11

When Google changed its search algorithm last month, Demand Media took a serious hit. According to a comparison by Conductor, the search visibility of Demand Media's eHow site dropped significantly, which explains why the company saw a notable drop also in stock value. The rumours around the company were so pessimistic that it was forced to issue a statement defending its finances.

The California-based Demand Media, which according to Reuters has 13,000 freelancers writing to its sites such as eHow and LiveStrong, is now taking measures to step up the content of its sites. In an interview with MediaShift, Larry Fitzgibbon and Jeremy Reed from Demand Media described the course the company is next taking. Some of the changes sound very much like steps towards a more traditional journalistic model.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-09 19:10

The UK Press Complaints Commission is seeking to bring journalistic Twitter feeds under its regulation, the Guardian reported

The article noted that while the PCC is currently unable to rule on complaints about newspapers' tweets, it is trying to consolidate social media messages under its remit and has started consultation with the newspapers industry to this end.

Some postings on Twitter should be considered - in PCC's opinion- as part of a "newspaper's editorial product" and should go under the regulation of the code of practice.

The plan, however, the Guardian said, is to distinguish between newspapers' accounts, professional journalistic accounts and private tweets. "Some journalists - such as the BBC's Rory Cellan-Jones - already maintain multiple accounts in an effort to preserve professional and personal distinctions", the article noted.

The article also reported that a PCC online working group has already recommended that the body undertake a "remit extension", the formal mechanism by which the self-regulatory body takes on a new area of responsibility, after consulting with the newspaper industry as to how Twitter regulation can be implemented.
"That consultation is due to finish in the summer and the new rules are likely to be in place by the end of the year."

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-09 18:03

The ways people navigate the digital news environment is the focus of a Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism's study, published today, May 9.

While debating whether the print press will die, if social networks will replace traditional news or not, or, more practically, how to find a suitable revenue model for digital news, it would be useful first to understand what people consume online. Where they go, how they get there and what lures them away: understanding these issues is the aim of the Pew study.

Based on audience statistics from the Nielsen Company, Pew examined the top 25 news websites in popularity in the US, focusing on four main aspects: how users get to the top news sites; how long they stay during each visit; how deep they go into a site and where they go when they leave.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-09 14:30

As already noted, the news of Osama Bin Laden's death, which has filled newspapers pages and monopolized every news stream, first spread onTwitter. Not only the first credible feedback came from a tweet by Keith Urbahn, chief of staff for former defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld, but also the first feedback of any kind came from an IT consultant who lives close to Abbottabad, where the raid took place, and who live-tweeted the attack, even without knowing it.

Some then praised the role Twitter played, wondering if it could ever come to replace traditional media.

Dan Mitchell on the SF Weekly blog, addressing the issue, argued that "no, Twitter hasn't replaced CNN". With no intent of diminishing the role it played of what he called "the best real-time headline service yet invented and a place to come across news I wouldn't otherwise see", he however questioned if this could be called "citizen journalism".

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-06 16:28

Ongo, a paid digital news aggregation service backed with $12million in funding from The New York Times Co, The Washington Post Co, and Gannett, aims to offer a premium news reading experience to those who are tired of scouring the web for news. Live since January, it is available online or via an iPad app.

For $6.99 a month, users get access to a selection of stories from The New York Times, all stories from The Associated Press, The Washington Post print edition and USA TODAY, selected content from the Financial Times, Reuters' top stories, plus one additional title from a selection of 25, including The Boston Globe, the Guardian, or Slate. Readers can add on additional publications priced between 99c and $14.99

It is an aggregator that keeps the reader within its site, or app, licensing content from publishers so that it is in control of the user experience. Stories are displayed in an app-like, easy-to-read format, even online, and the personalization functions include a 'My Topics' section allows the reader to customize their own news "playlist," filtered by title, section or keyword. Readers can save stories for later in 'Clippings.'

Who's it for?

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-05-06 16:09

The Daily Telegraph launched today an updated version of its iPad app, Financial Times reported. The new edition of The Telegraph for the iPad can be downloaded for a one-off fee of £1.19 or as part of a monthly subscription, priced at £9.99. The previous version of the app, launched last September, was free.

The app's new features include interactive crosswords, picture galleries and a seven-day archive of the paper's cartoons. Also added is the possibility to increase text size by "pinching", a 30-day archive of back issues and a night-reading mode.

The launch follows yesterday's news concerning Apple's deal with Hearst Corp, which saw the iPad manufacturer take a more flexible stance than before as regards its App Store terms. Financial Times's Tech Hub reported that Edward Roussel, The Telegraph's digital editor, described Apple as "co-operative and helpful" during the development of the app.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-06 14:28

First came WikiLeaks: huge mass of classified documents submitted to Julian Assange's organizations and the way by which there were submitted first, by the US army intelligence analyst Bradley Manning, and analysed then, have marked a watershed in dealing with secret information and had a notable international impact.

There is no lack of precedents in whistleblowing, such as the Pentagon Papers, published during the 70s, but digital technologies and the Web have given to both whistleblowers and news organizations a completely different perspective.

WikiLeaks prompted considerable debate on the best ways to handle secret documents, and other newspapers and organizations have launched their own whistle-blowing platforms. Following OpenLeaks, Localeaks and FrenchLeaks and Al Jazeera's Transparency Unit, the Wall Street Journal launched SafeHouse, its own whistle-blowing site, on May 5.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-06 14:09

After Time Inc. and Hearst, the Daily Telegraph has become the latest news publisher to sign up to Apple's terms on digital subscriptions with its new iPad app. The Guardian reported that the app is free to download but charges readers £1.19 for a single edition, or £9.99 for a monthly subscription. Telegraph newspaper subscribers get full access to its iPad edition for free.

Which papers have the best chance of being around in ten years? Business Insider listed its picks.

The Guardian is 190 years old. Born on 5 May 1821 as the Manchester Guardian, the paper celebrates its long life during which it has essentially changed neither its ownership nor its character, it declared.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-05 18:36

The huge potentiality offered to news media by social media and social networks have already been widely discussed.

But does the overwhelming tide of information have any consequences on the credibility of online news?

Writing for (y)EU, the collective blog of the Web-team of the European Parliament, published an article addressing the issue. The article cited Edelman's media guru Steve Rubel who said that the word recognized as the Oxford Word of the Year 2009 - which was "unfriend" - marked the passage from the "democratization" of the internet to the "accreditation" era.

People don't know how to survive in the jungle of information online and they are turning to experts and specialists to guide them, says the article. If in 2006 the main source of trust was "people like me, my peer", in 2010 academic, experts, CEOS, NGOs and government representatives gained positions.

The article goes on noting that this is far form being the end of social media, of course, but that it means that to be credible and influential and to stand out from the wave it's necessary to build a sort of "digital authority".

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-05 18:29

As the battle between native and web apps rages on, newspapers and magazines wanting to expand to digital publishing have to make some tough decisions. Fortune seems to have faith in web apps, as the magazine launches today, May 5th, its web app Fortune500+, AdAge reported. At first, the app will run on computers only but will soon work on tablet browsers as well.

The appeal of web apps is easy to understand: unlike native apps, built for a single platform, web apps work cross-platform as they run inside the web browser. Opting for a web app, thus, makes it possible to reach the maximum number of readers with only one version of the app.

AdAge's article notes that the list of web apps is growing, albeit slowly. Although many magazines have chosen to publish exclusively for the iPad, few have so far developed web apps. "I think you'll see that more and more apps will go this way," said Daniel Roth, managing editor at Fortune.com. Despite the slow pace, HTML5 powered web publishing seems to be gathering momentum, the people behind OnSwipe, for example, being very strongly in favour of web apps.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-05-05 15:58

After Bloomberg paved the way for making deals with Apple (Business Week was the first business publication to accept Apple's terms over apps subscriptions and signed with the company), the Cupertino giant is moving forward with new deals over iPad subscriptions with other publishers.

Apple's terms have found publishers reluctant to agree on, as Apple stipulated that it would take a 30% share of the subscription price and would refuse to share customer data with publishers, denying them access to statistics that could be very useful in terms of development and advertising.

As Media Post reported, the latest to sign with Apple is Hearst Corp, which has struck a deal to sell digital subscriptions for three titles -- Esquire, Popular Mechanics and O, The Oprah Magazine.

Hearst is the first publisher to sell subscriptions to multiple titles through Apple's iTunes subscription service.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-05 14:13

The Knight Foundation donated $100,000 to a London-based defense fund for journalists, the Media Legal Defense Initiative, reported Journalism.co.uk. The group offers the media advice, legal resources and representation. The Foundation believes that press freedom has been waning since 2001, and that journalists need to be protected.

Australian media company Fairfax Media has announced it will be outsourcing sub-editing jobs and cutting back on staff. 90 subbing posts will be affected and 300 other jobs shed, according to the Guardian. The company hopes this will lead to a more efficient way of producing its papers. The staff have announced their intention to strike.

Reader's Digest relaunches this week with new columnists. Among the new columnists are Martha Lane Fox, who will be writing a technology column, and Donal MacIntyre, who will be concentrating on consumer issues. The improved magazine is targeted towards the over-45 age group.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-05-04 19:04


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