WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 23.10.2014


November 2010

Amazon announced on Monday that it would give publishers as much as 70 percent of the revenues it collects from selling newspapers and magazines through its Kindle store, The New York Times reported.

The royalty increase will take effect on December 1 and will be calculated on the retail price minus the delivery costs, The Associated Press reported. However, to qualify for it, "publications must be able to be read on all Kindle devices and applications built for devices such as Apple's iPhone and the Blackberry," Agence France-Presse explained.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-10 11:11

BBC journalist Zeinab Badawi speaks about the BBC itself and media freedom in Britain in a video posted by Journalism.co.uk.

The BBC's management has said there will be no new talks with striking journalists, as industrial action threatens to last until Christmas, reported Press Gazette.

MediaWeek offers a round-up of the most popular iPhone and iPad apps in the app store.

Propublica editors explain how they got hold of the government's secret dialysis data.

Clay Shirky on "The Shock of Inclusion and New Roles for News in the Fabric of Society," published on Poynter.org.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 19:39

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) and the World Editors Forum today called on Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to ensure that widespread attacks on journalists are aggressively prosecuted following the attempted murder of newspaper reporter Oleg Kashin.

"We are alarmed at the culture of impunity that surrounds attacks on journalists, which stifles criticism and can lead to self-censorship," the global organisations said in a letter to the president, which pointed to 19 unsolved murders of journalists in Russia. "We respectfully remind you that it is the duty of the state to provide an environment in which journalists are able to carry out their professional duties without fear of violence."

Mr Kashin, a reporter for the business daily Kommersant, suffered a fractured jaw, broken legs and injuries to his fingers and skull after being beaten outside his Moscow apartment building on Saturday (6 November). Kommersant editor Mikhail Mikhailin said that the attack was retribution for articles written by Mr Kashin, who had recently covered anti-Kremlin protests and extremist rallies.

WAN-IFRA welcomed President Medvedev's appointment of the Prosecutor General to oversee the case, and his remark that "the criminals must be found and punished", but said more needed to be done.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 16:54

AOL's hyperlocal news project, Patch, saw a huge boost in its traffic due to the November 2 midterm elections. According to Editor & Publisher, the network had a 300 percent traffic increase as visitors sought local results for the mid-term elections.

Warren Webster, president of Patch, said that Election Day accounted for the network's biggest traffic day yet, with the Santa Cruz Patch being the most popularly searched area.

The company, who said it is going to be the largest employer of journalists in the nation, has launched hyperlocal sites serving populations ranging from 15,000 to 75,000 across the United States, from Washington State to Rhode Island. However, the company is still expanding and according Nathalie Broizat, aims to cover 500 towns and regions by the end of the year.

In 2010 alone, Patch has hired 600 journalists and is still adding to that number. So where does this leave traditional local newspapers? Will the growth of Patch result in even further declines in local publications?

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-09 16:47

The Center for Public Integrity's first HTML5 project is live. The idea behind the project is to make reading long-form journalism enjoyable on any digital platform, by creating an app-like experience in a web browser. There has been some concern among news organisations that online, at least, it is more difficult to appreciate long in-depth articles than it is in print.

Applications, particularly for tablets, are perceived as offering a more comfortable and convenient reading experience for longer work, and less distraction. This belief is reflected by the launch a service founded earlier this year called Longform.org works with Instapaper to allow interested readers to select long-form stories on the Longform site, which are then stored in the reader's account to read at their leisure on their iPhone or iPad via Instapaper.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 16:15

In June, the San Diego Union-Tribune let go its art critic Robert Pincus who had been at the paper for 20 years. Responsibility for coverage was given to James Chute, the paper's music critic. In an effort to provide more arts coverage, the Union-Tribune set up a series of art blogs, inviting local artists to contribute. There is no pay, and the artists post direct to the site with no editing.

As the Voice of San Diego explained, local artist and art professor Katherine Sweetman was to start writing one of these blogs, but instead she used the space to criticize the whole scheme.

"In an effort to step up the appearance of supporting the visual arts, The Union Tribune has graciously offered a handful of artists, scholars, and arts professionals the opportunity to write for them-- requiring only one blog post per week (52 per year). And the pay? Oh... no pay...

And then it hit us.

We hate the Union Tribune.

We hate the way they abruptly ended the tenure of the most important arts critic in San Diego's history. We hate James Chute's pathetic coverage of artists-- which just makes us look bad (seriously, read his stuff)...

It seems, to me, visual artists should be boycotting the Union Tribune not writing for them-- for free!"

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 13:01

The Hammersmith and Fulham council, in West London, announced that it would close in April its free newspaper H&F News in response to the rules proposed by Communities and Local Government Secretary Eric Pickles, who in June declared a war to what he calls "town hall Pravdas," MediaGuardian reported today.

The council will maintain an e-mail newsletter to inform citizens about services it provides. However, it also plans to look "for a buyer to take over advertising contracts thought to be worth around £375,000," the Hammersmith and Fulham Chronicle revealed. The council will expect to receive a percentage of the advertising revenues as well as "regular slot" in the publication to include notices and information. "The newspaper we choose to have a contract with will always be 100 per cent independent of us," said a council spokesman.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-09 10:18

The Washington Post has just launched an app for the iPad, which is free until mid-February 2011, according to a press release. The app requires registration.

"The Washington Post App for iPad is more than just an extension of our paper or website. It's an innovative, portable experience with our content that enables users to interact in a multi-dimensional way. Users can take full advantage of the experience that the iPad offers through our rich destination pages that provide everything a reader would want around a topic in one comprehensive place," said Raju Narisetti, managing editor, The Washington Post.

A "distinctive component" of the app, according to the paper, is Live Topics. This focuses on the top three to five issues of the day and aggregates news, commentary, social media, multimedia and user engagement around these. Washington Post stories, selected headline from around the web, Facebook comments and Twitter feeds are all included. The feature is designed "to draw users in to share their comments and opinions about key topics of the day that are relevant to them and the world at large," the paper said.

The app offers "comprehensive content" and the ability to comment and share stories via email, Facebook and Twitter. Stories can be saved for offline reading.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 18:30

Russian reporters are putting pressure on President Dmitry Medvedev to solve one of the latest attacks on a leading journalist, reports AFP. Another journalist was assaulted today, Reuters reported this afternoon.

Yahoo has rolled out Weekend Edition on Yahoo News, a lifestyle-focused content package, MediaWeek noted.

Nieman Lab looks at how Global Post got more than 100,000 fans on Facebook.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 17:07

A new browser called RockMelt will offer users a way to stay connected to their friends and indeed, their "world," as they navigate web pages. "Why not build the world right into your browser?" a blog post on RockMelt.com asks.

RockMelt's fundamental goal seems to be making browsing the Web a personal experience. Users will have to log in to use RockMelt, and as all the information entered is stored in the cloud, a user's account can be accessed from anywhere with all its settings.

It connects with Facebook and other social sites and allows users to chat with friends directly through the browser, and keep track of what they are doing. A sharing function has been built directly into the browser so that users can share to Facebook or Twitter with one click. They can keep their favourite contacts always visible along the left-hand side and share links with them simply by dragging and dropping.

Maybe particularly interestingly for news organisations, the browser will also keep track of users' favourite sites and will alert them to new stories or posts. A column down the side of the browser allows quick access to these sites and displays the number of new updates.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 16:37

The Global Investigative Journalism Network has launched a petition to allow journalists to publically express their support for Wikileaks and its founder Julian Assange, whom they believe "has made an outstanding contribution to transparency and accountability on the Afghanistan and Iraq wars." More than 150 journalists from forty different countries all over the world have signed the petition so far.

"We believe Wikileaks had the right to post confidential military documents because it was in the interest of the public to know what was happening," the journalists' statement says. The latest major leak from Wikileaks, militrary documents on the Iraq war, has attracted significant international attention. The statement addresses the concern expressed that by releasing so much military information direct to the public, Wikileaks had endangered lives. It notes that there has been no evidence of this as yet, and that Wikileaks learnt from its experience with the Afghanistan documents and had vetted the Iraq war logs further.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 13:53

Journalistic institutions in Italy have launched an initiative to push parliament and the ministry of work to create a law that would fix minimum standards for the payment and treatment of freelance journalists, reported LSDI. The effort follows the publication of an ebook on the condition of journalists in Italy, written and published by LSDI.

"It is absolutely unacceptable that independent work is paid with compensation so low that the vast majority of freelance journalists declare an average annual income that is lower than the poverty threshold indicated by ISTAT [the Italian statistics institute]," said the LSDI article. This is the feeling of those who met for the release of the ebook on journalists' conditions, who included Enzo Iacopino, president of the Italian Order of Journalists, Andrea Camporese, president of INPGI (social security for journalists), Andrea Cerrato, president of Casagit (health benefits for journalists) and Roberto Natale and Franco Siddi, president and secretary of FNSI, the Italian journalists' union.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 12:33

The UK version of Wired magazine has launched its first iPad edition, priced at £2.39, Journalism.co.uk reported yesterday. From 2011, the Condé Nast publication will seek to offer monthly downloads, after studying both consumers and advertisers.

"We believe the key to a successful app edition is to use multimedia to enhance storytelling rather than to distract from it: to provide video when the user really needs to 'be' somewhere, and audio when you want to hear a music track, rather than using gimmicks simply because they're an option," said Wired UK Editor David Rowan, Media Week reported.


For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-08 11:07

Digital director of the Times of London, Gurtej Sandhu, is to leave after implementing the paper's paywall, according to Marketing Week. News International released the first paywall figures earlier this week.

The last female staff reporter has left the New York Observer, noted the Awl, leave nine men on staff at the paper.

A Demand Media journalist has described his experiences working for the so-called 'content farm' in the Columbia Journalism Review.

See Poynter.org for live blogging and a video stream of the institute's event "Finding the Future of Journalism: Poynter's Social Media Day."

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 18:46

The Pakistan Federal Union of Journalists (PFUJ) warmly welcomed the decision of the Express Media Group for appointing a news ombudsman, reported the Associated Press of Pakistan.

A news ombudsman acts as a mediator between the expectations of the public and the responsibilities of journalists in order to promote accuracy, fairness, transparency and quality standards of journalism. His main task is to handle complaints from the public about news reporting and to provide a sort of internal quality control, writing columns or internal memos about complaints.

The Express Tribune, which launched earlier this year and is a partner of the International Herald Tribune, appointed as ombudsman Justice (retd) Fakhruddin G Ebrahim, a well-known jurist and constitutional expert, who will occupy a non-monetary position. During his career he served as senior advocate in the Supreme Court, federal law minister, attorney general and the governor of Sindh, the paper said.

Readers are invited to contact him for every concerns and complaints about the fairness and accuracy of the newspaper and "The Express Tribune will accept his decision on these matters as final", the paper announced.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-11-05 18:09

The Syrian parliament is preparing to vote on an Internet law that journalists fear could curtail the freedom of the online media, which is greater than that of print media, Agence France-Presse reported. Many news websites have emerged in Syria in the last few years and, less scrutinized than traditional media, they have become an important source of information on subjects that print media cannot cover, said AFP.

The new law would allow police to enter editorial offices to arrest journalists and seize computers, AFP heard from Ayman Abdel Nour, director of the website all4syria.org. A pro-government news website director Nidal Maalouf said to the AFP that it would be harder to criticize the government under the new law as online media would be overseen by the information ministry.

Meanwhile Syria's less repressive neighbour Lebanon, although enjoying a higher level of online freedom than other Arab countries, has recently seen arrests, detentions and intimidation of Lebanese citizens for their online activities, reported the New York Times. "The most dangerous topics to speak out against online are the army and the president," the NYT said.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 16:25

The BBC faces a disrupted news service today and tomorrow across its main TV and radio news programmes as staff strike over pensions. Some of the BBC star presenters are joining the strike, including Fiona Bruce and Kirsty Wark, reported the Guardian.

Radio 4's Today Programme was taken off the air today, and World At One and Front Row were replaced, amongst other shows. Newsnight and the Six O'Clock News are likely to be affected.

The BBC issued a statement expressing its disappointment that the National Union of Journalists have gone ahead with today's industrial action, noting that four other unions have accepted the organisation's latest revised offer. The NUJ represents about 4,100 BBC journalists, said the Guardian. Further strikes are threatened.

A blog post from BBC director general Mark Thompson explained how the strike had come about and stressed that those who are losing out most are "the very people we hare here to serve - our audiences."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 16:10

Forbes is planning to involve its readers more in both the print and digital versions of its magazine. Lewis DVorkin, chief product officer of Forbes Media, recently wrote about how "At Forbes, we're beginning to open up our print and digital platforms so many more knowledgeable and credible content creators can provide information and perspective and connect with one another," he said.

He noted that with the launch of this year's Forbes 400, reader content began to appear in the pages of the magazine. "What was yesterday's audience is today's cadre of potential experts who can report what they know or filter information for distribution to friends who trust their judgments," he wrote.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 14:02

Newspapers and broadcasters in the United Kingdom are less willing to spend money on investigative journalism than ever before, causing the type of reporting newspapers have been hailed for to begin "dying a death," documentary maker Kevin Toolis told a panel at the Sheffield Doc/Fest today, MediaGuardian reported.

Investigative reporting is "disgracefully expensive," and needs more outlets willing to pay for it, David Henshaw, managing director of Hardcash Productions.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 11:17

Changes are being made to Trinity Mirror's digital executive line-up as it creates a new digital business unit within the nationals division, reports paidContent. Matt Kelly, nationals digital content director who had announced he was leaving is now staying to become publisher within this new division.

Is ignoring the press an emerging political strategy, asks the Texas Watchdog.

The Associated Press is to start offering high definition video as part of its service early next year, the news organisation reported.

The Guardian's Roy Greeslade offers his thoughts on the Media Standard Trust's survey on international news reporting in the UK.

Facebook is launching a potential Foursquare killer, says CNET.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-04 18:44

French satirical weekly Le Canard enchainé has claimed that president Nicolas Sarkozy personally supervises a security team that spies on journalists who write stories that might embarrass the government. The allegations follow a lawsuit brought by Le Monde in September that accused the government of illegally investigating its journalists' sources, and burglaries of the homes of journalists from Le Monde, Médiapart and Le Point.

In an article by editor-in-chief Claude Angeli, Le Canard said that that a special team of agents has been created within the French internal security service, the Division Centrale du Renseignement Intérieur, to lead the investigations. "Since the beginning of the year, at least, as soon as a journalist starts an investigation which could cause trouble for him or those close to him, Sarkozy has been asking Bernard Squarcini to get involved," Le Canard claimed. Squarcini is head of the DCRI.

According to Le Canard, the agents start by investigating the telephone bills of journalists to identify their sources. The paper's editor said that its sources were inside the DCRI, said the Independent.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-04 18:19

OWNI has launched its first English-language site, OWNI.eu, reported Journalism.co.uk. OWNI, which describes itself as a group of French and European media, as well as a thinktank, experiments with digital journalism and, for example, recently created Wikileaks' Iraq War Logs website.

The new site OWNI.eu has articles on technology, politics and culture: a mixture of original content, translations from pieces on OWNI.fr, blog aggregation, infographics and data visualizations, explained Journalism.co.uk. Its editor is 25-year-old Federica Cocco.

OWNI also has verticals covering science, music and politics, and has launched campaigns for freedom of information online. It is committed to protecting digital rights in France, and its foundations was partly inspired by opposition to the Hadopi bill which was introduced in France in spring 2009 to regulate Internet access and protect copyright.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-04 13:51

The Washington Times was sold yesterday for just US$1 to a group led by the Rev. Sun Myung Moon, leader of the Unification Church and founder of the newspaper, The Associated Press revealed.

The new owners agreed to assume the newspaper's debt and restore the sports section, which was eliminated earlier this year to cut costs, The Washington Post noted. According to an article published in the Washington Times, the organisation "will likely expand into radio and will broaden its presence on the Web."


For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-04 10:48

The Times of London is to launch a one-off iPad app to accompany a special edition of its monthly science magazine Eureka, reports Journalism.co.uk.

Newly-elected Brazilian president Dilma Rousseff has pledged that her government will respect freedom of expression, after an election campaign during which several allegations were made about attacks on press freedom, according to the Guardian's Roy Greenslade.

Polskapresse has started a project called Junior Media which will help children and teachers put together their own local newspapers in schools, says Forum4editors.

Emily Bell takes a look at the numbers around the Times' paywall.

A search engine called Blekko has been launched that will include a human element, it claims. (Reuters)

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-03 19:19


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