WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 28.11.2014


November 2010

Rupert Murdoch's tablet-only news publication, to be called The Daily, will be launched exclusively as an app for the iPad, and appear later on Android tablets, reports last week revealed. Since then, we've learned that The Daily's budget is believed to be US$30 million, with a staff of about 100, according to a report today by PC World.

A round-up of other information on the project is after the jump.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-23 10:55

The European Journalism Centre has relaunched its Media Landscape series profiling the state of national media in Europe, reported Journalism.co.uk. The Media Landscape 2010 site is an update on EJC's previous reports in 2006 and hosts 38 country and six neighbour state profiles.

The South and East Europe Media Organisation, a network of editors, media executives and leading journalists from South and East Europe and an affiliate of the International Press Institute, has denounced the recent assault on journalist Piro Nase, in the town of Gjirokastra, in Albania.

Is Apple developing a new and improved 'World iPad,' asks All Things Digital?

The Guardian looked at the effect of the announcement of Prince William's engagement on the national press: sales were up and the event shows how much the relationship between the press and the royals has changed over the years, believes Stephen Brook.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-22 19:41

The Guardian is reporting on yet another successful hyperlocal start-up, The Litchfield Blog, saying that "it is showing the way ahead" for entrepreneurial journalism.

With more and more hyperlocal news sites such as AOL's Patch and Boston.com's YourTown exploding onto the market, many journalists are turning away from traditional print news and steering their attention towards the rapidly expanding hyperlocal domain.

According to the Guardian's Greenslade blog, "The Litchfield Blog has rightly established a national reputation in less than two years."

The blog's editor, Ross Hawkes, feeling that his local community in Staffordshire was not being effectively covered, partnered with local web developer, Phillip John, who built the site and "established connections with nearby blog, Facebook and Twitter users." Through this, the site gained popularity within the Litchfield community and "partnerships between the blog and the citizens." How much money it makes is unclear, with Hawkes specifying that he never went into journalism for the money.

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-22 18:54

Regarding the highly uncertain shape and form of future media, Rafat Ali, founder of successful digital news site, paidContent, is confident that touchscreen devices will soon become the dominant form of news consumption.

Ali, an entrepreneur with a background in journalism, recently supported his prediction during the Online News Association Conference in Washington, D.C. by firstly looking to the "tactile nature of touchscreens." He believes that in today's overwhelming omnipresence of media and information, touchscreens will allow the public to process the news in "a lot more personal, a lot more immersive [manner], just by the sheer fact that we are touching it."

However Ali fails to explain, at least based on Appolicious' article, how touchscreen technology is more tactile than an old-fashioned newspaper. It appears obvious that a hard copy newspaper is as tactile as one can get, and that touchscreens are the digital world's attempt at narrowing the gap between virtual reality and the tangible, classic newspaper.

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2010-11-22 13:45

Last week, Google announced that it had created new metatags for Google News that would help identify original stories and consequently, which publication got the scoop. The initiative aims to tackle the fact that hundreds of articles will often appear based around one story, and seeks to credit original stories with higher rankings in Google News search results. This change in ranking won't happen immediately: Google first wants to gather enough data to test the method's effectiveness.

The two tags are 'syndication-source,' which publishers should use to indicated the preferred URL for a syndicated article and 'original-source' which should indicate the URL of the first article to report on this story.

With regards to the latter, the Google blog explains, "We encourage publishers to use this metatag to give credit to the source that broke the story. We recognize that this can sometimes be tough to determine. But the intent of this tag is to reward hard work and journalistic enterprise."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-22 13:23

Rupert Murdoch's Australian newspapers will start charging for online content next year, News Corp. News Digital Media CEO Richard Freudenstein announced today, The Guardian revealed.

In an interview with ABC News radio, Freudenstein said The Australian, Daily Telegraph and the Herald-Sun were unlikely to follow The Times of London paywall model. "I think we're quite attracted to the Wall Street Journal model where you get the benefit of still getting a lot of your advertising revenue combining it with the ability to market yourself to a whole range of people and then upselling them into the paid part of the site," he said.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-22 10:57

Alan Rusbridger, editor of the Guardian, gave a speech entitled "The splintering of the fourth estate" in Sydney today. In it, he tackled the way journalists can make best use of Twitter, the potential News Corp-BSkyB merger, and the general direction of news organisations.

News Corp's Australian arm, News Ltd, is to put its papers behind a paywall, ABC reported. However, they are unlikely to follow the same model as the Times of London, the most complete form of paywall so far.

According to the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas, a new report from the Fundación MEPI, an independent investigative journalism center, says that the regional press in Mexico cover less than 5 percent of killings, attacks and violence linked to organized crime in the country, and the silence imposed by the cartels has created "black holes of information."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-19 19:25

Details are emerging about News Corp's forthcoming tablet newspaper, The Daily. News Corp has spent the last three months putting together a newsroom that will soon be 100-strong, said WWD's John Koblin. The Daily will launch in beta around Christmas and will be offered to the public in early 2011, on the iPad and other tablet devices.

Koblin's sources said that the new paper will aim to have "a tabloid sensibility with a broadsheet intelligence." The editorial page is expected to have "a sort of optimistic, populist stance," he said

The staff are already at work in the News Corp building on Sixth Avenue in New York, though will move floors once their office is ready. There will be no foreign bureaux - The Daily will be covering the US only - and as yet there are no plans for a DC bureau, Koblin said, although politics will be covered.

Yahoo! blog The Cutline reported that the names of those who might staff it have been leaking out, mentioning the "increasingly high-profile masthead that suggests the Daily will be a force to be reckoned with." WWD said that The Daily is "staffing up with a lot of bright, young twentysomething journalistic talent working at media properties throughout the city."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-19 19:03

In the age of iPads, smartphones, social media and blogging, it's not just news publishers that need to change up, or even better, digitalize their tactics. Journalists too, need to familiarize themselves with all digital technology has to offer.

According to Forbes, "Journalism is no longer just about writing and reporting," and in order to keep up with the ever-expanding digital sector, journalists now need to be able to "do it all." But what exactly does doing it all entail?

Forbes chief product officer Lewis Dvorkin says that the "new breed of digital journalists" must be a reporter, writer, blogger, producer, editor, and photographer in addition to being a social media whiz. It's a mouthful, but as overwhelming as it may seem, he's probably right.

"Data-driven journalism is the future," World Wide Web creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee said. "It's going to be about poring over data and equipping yourself with the tools to analyze it and picking out what's interesting." But he goes into deeper explanation saying that in order for "the responsibility to be with the press," journalists need to keep the government accountable by being "data savvy."

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-19 18:35

An article by Chadwick Matlin in the Columbia Journalism Review discusses the "Faustian bargain" news organisations make when they make use of plentiful slideshows online.

Having worked at The Big Money (part of the Slate Group), Matlin describes the publication's quest for pageviews on its site in May 2009 and how its prayers were answered with the arrival of the capability to produce slideshows, which earn a page view for every click, and allow multiple ads to be displayed.

"Within days we ran our first slideshow, a visual essay about the history of credit-card design," he explains. "Overnight, we found our 100,000 page views. Over the next few days, the slideshow made up 40 percent of our total traffic."

Slideshows were great for bringing money, and therefore "soon became an editorial priority," with a dedicated spot in the weekly story meeting and even their own meetings. And, says Matlin, the Big Money (which has since closed) was not alone.

He believes that although they can be informative and insightful, slideshows are increasingly being published "because of the medium, not the message." He cites the Huffington Post as an example of a place where "the line has been irretrievably crossed" between the use of slideshows as a fun novelty to "craven solicitation."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-19 17:32

Journalists from five Irish Johnston Press Group newspapers intend to go on strike next Tuesday after hearing of possible staff cuts that will occur as a result of putting a new editorial production system in place that the publisher's management thinks will abolish the need for sub-editors, MediaGuardian reported.

"This strike is about protecting employment but it is also about defending journalistic standards," said Nicola Coleman, the organiser for the National Union of Journalists in Ireland. "The experience of this union in the UK is that the new system and reduced staffing levels have led to chaos - the results have been disastrous publications."


For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-19 12:48

The Economist has launched applications for the iPhone and iPad: the full print edition of the news weekly will be available to download each Thursday at 9pm London time, the Economist site says. The full edition of the magazine is paid-for, but the editor's highlights are available to all and the app is free to download.

Print or online subscribers have free access to the full edition, or it is possible to buy a single issue for £3.49. This compares to £4.00 for the print edition. Annual print/digital subscriptions are available from £102, and digital only for £99. The Economist provides content free on its site for up to 90 days, with the archives and additional content available by subscription only.

"We have reformatted the newspaper to make the most of these devices while retaining the familiar feel of The Economist, with all the articles, charts, maps and images from each week's print edition," the site said. All content is downloaded so that it is accessible on or offline.

The audio edition is included in the app, so that users can listen to every article read by a professional newscaster. This is an interesting feature: many publications offer a selection of articles via audio but to have the whole edition is unusual, and useful for people using the app on the go.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-19 12:17

Die Zeit has launched an iPad-optimised version of its website, Zeit Online, the paper reported, to account for the fact that the tablet device uses touch navigation. The iPad-site is just a first step, the paper said, and versions for additional devices will be developed when they become big enough in the German market.

One of the changes is to put much larger touch spaces around text links. Another is to allow finger swipes through slide shows. "The overall design asks for a strict reduction down to a site's very essence for users to quickly find their way around," a blog posting said.

The content will not change, the posting said, specifying that "A core editorial request in regards to our new iPad-site was that our newsdesk would not have to think of different sites, but could focus on one identical sequence and presentation of ZEIT ONLINE's topics, no matter which device they appear on."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-18 19:23

All news can be global and local, declares the website of new start-up WorldCrunch, whose mission is to provide English translations of news articles from around the world. "What we're looking for is to provide a global view of the world," co-founder Jeff Israely told the Editors Weblog, explaining that global news should always be relevant in a local sense also.

Israely and his business partner Irene Toporkoff, both based in Paris, have just launched an alpha version of the WorldCrunch website, inviting interested users to sign up via email.

What is it?

The goal is to bring together a selection of articles from around the world, maybe 20 to 30 a day, carefully chosen by knowledgeable journalists, that will deepen the Anglophone public's knowledge of global affairs. It will be a general news site, covering topics from politics and economics to culture and entertainment, the only criteria being that stories have value for a global reader.

This value, Israely said, could come from the fact that they are exclusive, particularly timely, very deeply-reported, or simply because they provide a fascinating perspective. How Obama's recent visit to Indonesia was covered by the Indonesian or Chinese media, for example, could provide an intriguing contrast to English-language coverage.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-18 15:58

The Independent's new daily i is to launch its paid iPad application on Friday, the Guardian reported. The intention, Zach Leonard, managing director for digital at the Independent and the Evening Standard, told the Guardian, is for i to be "media neutral" and the publisher is looking at other digital outlets.

The app will be available for £1.79 for 10 issues of the paper, which amounts to a discount of around 10% on the 20p price of the print product. Twenty copies will be offered for £2.99, a discount of about 25%. The price was intended to be as close to the 20p price as possible, Leonard told the Guardian.

Five extra editions will be offered free to new subscribers to try to encourage more sign-ups. The launch sponsor will be Be Broadband, which will have space on the front page.

i, which provides Independent content edited to provide a more concise reading experience in a younger and more convenient format, was launched on October 26. It has been attracted average daily sales of about 125,000 copies, it was reported on November 8. Vouchers for a free week of i are being offered on the Independent's website.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-18 12:40

The Washington Independent announced today that it will be closing down by December 1 due to a lack of funding, the Columbia Journalism Review revealed.

In a post published on its website, Washington Independent editor Aaron Wiener wrote that the website "was not just a journalistic experiment; it was also a financial one, and ultimately, the successes of the former couldn't sustain the strains of the latter."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-18 10:48

Apple has made a strong effort to keep iPad apps as PG-rated as possible, so if you're looking to view risqué material on your iPad, you're looking in the wrong place. Or are you?

According to Mashable, Apple rejects most apps "featuring women in bikinis or lingerie" citing them as too "explicit." This includes the November issue of Esquire magazine which features the "sexiest woman alive," but excludes The Sun's app which contains the well-known 'page 3' section - including a 360 view of naked beauties who "pirouette" on command.

So what distinguishes whether an app is deemed too family-unfriendly? Good question. Phillip W. Schiller, head of worldwide product marketing at Apple, told The New York Times in an interview earlier this year that "the difference is this is a well-known company with previously published material available broadly in a well-accepted format."

So The Sun's page 3 is well accepted but Esquire's 'sexiest woman alive' is not? Although the reason for Apple's censorship of Esquire has not been determined, is it fair for them to allow some publications to show 'explicit' images but not others?

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-17 19:46

The International Press Institute's recent mission to Italy concluded that "while the media in Italy is marked by a strong degree of freedom, there are pockets of serious concern." These areas of concern include Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's domination of the broadcast sector, the involvement of state judiciary in journalistic accreditation, and the threats and intimidation journalists encounter as a result of organised crime.

Meanwhile, Owni.eu's Federica Cocco has looked at the difficulties encountered by Italian journalists, and the new efforts which attempt to challenge these by providing "information free from censorship, distortions and political bias, as well as new opportunities for those who have been denied them by a rigidly cast system that seems to have no intention of letting go of its privileges."

More than 120 pages of the UK's papers were devoted to covering the engagement of Prince William and Kate Middleton, Roy Greenslade found. He examines the coverage here and images are here.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-17 19:41

After introducing a comment feature on their website three years ago, the website of the Janesville Gazette, Gazettextra, is now retracting reader comment capability from certain kinds of its stories.

The elimination of the discussion section comes after comment threads have been bombarded with "troublesome" commentary that often strays from topic and leads into "insults, innuendo and other kinds of offensive remark," editor Scott Angus said in a blog posting.

The comments, which were originally designed to facilitate discussion between readers, "allowed people from all different backgrounds, beliefs and interests" to engage in conversations regarding the stories, but Angus said "it hasn't worked out as well as we had hoped."

Although comments proved to be a popular feature, with readers leaving about 10,000 comments a month, Angus says the site needs to make changes in order to "bring more civility to online discussions," as people don't seem to stop with the inappropriate remarks.

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-17 19:38

YouCommNews, Australia's version of community-funded portal Spot.us, published its first story which was commissioned by the site's readers, Journalism.co.uk wrote. The project was launched in September by The Foundation for Public Interest Journalism, a division of the Institute for Social Research at Swinburne University in Melbourne.

Journalist Toula Mantis published "In Search of Non-Toxic Housing for Health's Sake", the first article in a series of ten articles studying Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Swinburne.edu reported. A total sum of AUD 878 (€636) was gathered from 17 separate contributors, with donations ranging from AUD5 (€3.6) to AUD100 (€72). Mantis offered a proposal for the story and provided AUD108 (€78) in August. The story was initially published under a Creative Commons License so that other outlets could reproduce it.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-17 15:53

It would be tempting to assume, especially given the unsurprising fact that the New York Times website ranks number one in terms of worldwide usage, that all of today's most viewed news websites have sprouted from prestigious, well-established, internationally-known print newspapers. Not necessarily the case. In fact, the second most viewed newspaper website worldwide is the UK Daily Mail's online counterpart, Mail Online.

Just how did this middle-range tabloid's website rise from relative obscurity to become the second most popular newspaper site in the world, and the most popular news site in the UK?

Martin Clarke, Mail Online's executive, credits his rapidly increasing traffic to his acceptance and incorporation of online social networks, specifically Facebook and Twitter, into his marketing strategy. Recent data (from Nathalie Broizat) shows that 10% of Mail Online's UK traffic arrives via Facebook referrals.


Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2010-11-17 13:26

A coalition of international press freedom and human rights organisations, including WAN-IFRA, have called on the government of Yemen "to end the practice of extrajudicial trials for journalists" following a hearing for Saba news agency reporter Abdul Ilah Hayder Shae, who is being held in military detention for his work covering Al-Qaeda.

Representatives from the International Partnership for Yemen, who attended Mr Shae's latest hearing before the Specialised Criminal Court on 9 November during a week-long mission to Yemen, called on President Ali Abdullah Saleh "to immediately release Abdul Ilah Hayder Shae and all other journalists being held in detention for carrying out their profession." Mr Shae has denounced the extrajudicial court hearing his case as unconstitutional.

Mr Shae's case is the latest example of the Yemeni authorities' willingness to silence journalists and stifle press freedom in the country. The mission has also warned that international concerns over Yemen's troubled security situation, and the subsequent increased security measures employed by the government, do not justify the repression of press freedom and other fundamental human rights.

For more on this story please see our sister publication, the Arab Press Network.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-17 12:39

Is the future of news online-only? It's a trend that has caught on in the US and France, for example, and now Italy has also begun to see the appearance of pure online news projects.

One of these, Lettera43, was launched on 7 October as a new online newspaper. Lettera43 is a newspaper run by a young newsroom - the average age is 30 - with a magazine-style approach. It combines news and analysis, and it offers readers a summary of each article that they can read before deciding whether or not to read the extended version. "To be fast and multimedia doesn't mean being superficial," said editor and co-founder Paolo Madron, former editor of Panorama Economy and former correspondent for IlSole24Ore.

The Editors Weblog spoke to Madron about his aims and hopes for the new publication.

EW: What was the motivation behind launching a new newspaper in 2010? Is this a good time given that, on the one hand, the press is encountering a crisis, symbolized by the Philip Meyer's prediction that dates the last printed copy of the New York Times to 2043, and, on the other hand, thanks to the Web, we are over-exposed to the media?

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-11-17 11:52

The New York Times announced today it will further merge its print and online operations, with online producers now reporting directly to their respective desks, according to Yahoo! news blog The Cutline.

Digital news editor Jim Roberts has been made assistant managing editor for news, and the new editor for emerging platforms is Fiona Spruill, currently the Web newsroom editor. The continually consolidating print and online staff is an effort to continue streamlining operations, executive editor Bill Keller explained. There is also a possibility that the separate online and print union contracts will be merged.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-17 11:14


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