WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 31.10.2014


July 2010

Günter Grass, the Nobel Prize-winning German author, has joined the programme of the 17th World Editors Forum, to be held in Hamburg, Germany, from 6 to 8 October next.

Grass will make a presentation about his memoir, Mein Jahrhundert (My Century), and engage in a question and answer session at the WEF conference, the annual global meeting for the world's editors-in-chief and other senior newsroom executives. Mr Grass, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1999, is known for his political engagement with issues such as the Nazi past, the arms race, environmentalism, racism, and the unification of Germany.
The World Editors Forum calls 2010 "The Tablet Year" and has dedicated much of its annual conference to how mobile distribution is changing the news business.

But the conference does not neglect traditional newspapers: the WEF has announced that Giovanni di Lorenzo, Editor-in-Chief of Die Zeit and one of Germany's best-known journalists, will present a keynote address on "Why I Believe in Print." Mr di Lorenzo argues that as long as editors are unable to sufficiently monetize digital content, they should work even harder to defend and diversify print.

For more information please see the press release and the conference website.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-06 15:12

The new issue of Sport et Citoyenneté looks at the relationship between sport and the media. Given the increased interest in sports news as a result of the World Cup and various tennis championships, how to make the best of sports coverage has been a particularly pertinent issue for editors.

Rosarita Cuccoli, secretary general of the International Association of Sports Newspapers, discussed the question of how sports media should depict the violence, racism and other negative issues that sometimes accompany sports events. The risk is that showing violence could incite further violence, but she believes that in order to be an accurate and comprehensive 'mirror' of what goes on, it is necessary to report on these events. She noted that international sporting events have meant that the sports press has been "increasingly investigating into all that is social, political and economic around sport," and that by bringing the negative sides of sport to the public attention, the sports press can actually have a positive effect on society by teaching people to avoid these things.

"The press's leverage is a double-edged sword. Leverage calls for responsibility. The objectivity of the content and an appropriate use of the language must be an imperative for a sports press that aspires to actively convey all the positive values intrinsic in sport, as opposed to simply representing and reproducing its flaws," she wrote.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-06 13:28

T.L. Caswell, formerly of the Los Angeles Times editing staff and current writer for Truthdig, recently published an article criticizing the Times' decision to run a realistic looking advertorial on the July 1st edition of their LATExtra. The publication, which has won 39 Pulitzer prizes, has the fourth largest circulation in the United States. Caswell, holding the newspaper in high esteem, expresses his sentiment that the Times is "among the greatest dailies of modern time." He adds, however, that "now, the good times are gone and, some will argue, the good Times is gone."

Facing bankruptcy, the Times, like many other publications, must make changes in order to survive. Caswell notes that is spite of staff cutbacks and several other adjustments, such as the introduction of the LATExtra section, have not "cured the ills" of the paper.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-06 12:43

The World Journalism Education Council released its latest census results on journalism education yesterday. The announcement coincides with this week's World Journalism Education Congress in Grahamstown, South Africa, The stated purpose of the World Journalism Education Census is to identify journalism education programs around the world and provide contact information and a link to those programs Web sites. As of July 5th the census was tracking 2,338 journalism education programs in the world.

Continent Programs Percent Africa 214 9.15% Asia 645 27.59% Europe 530 22.67% North America 691 29.56% Oceania 53 2.27% South America 205 8.77% Total 2,338 100.00%
View Table by Region

View Complete Census Data

The results suggest that 29.56 per cent of all journalism programs and education centres (691) are in North America. Asia hosts 645 programs, while Europe is home to 530. "The census, which counts centres of journalism training rather than individual degree courses, included: higher education-affiliated courses; practitioner and privately-operated education programs, whose quality can be verified; and finally courses that are being run, but whose quality has not been verified."

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-06 11:00

As the news publishing industry continues to try and figure out a viable economic model to replace print revenues, the Journal Register Company believes the future of journalism and the print industry lies in community crowdsourcing and the usage of free publishing tools available on the Internet.

To prove it, the American media company produced on Sunday the print editions of its 18 dailies and their website content using only free web-based sofwares such as Picasa, Gimp and Scribus, Editor & Publisher reported.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-06 10:53

In stark (and deliberate) contrast to the official raising of their competitor's paywall, the Guardian has launched a free syndication service for website owners running the popular Wordpress system. The Guardian News Feed plug-in allows users to search for and embed whole Guardian articles on their own sites. Adverts will be embedded within the Guardian blog posts hosted on other sites to build a global ad network, but bloggers will keep any revenue generated on their own sites from the ads. In a press release, the system is touted as the first-ever full article news feed plug-in released by a major publisher.

The WordPress plugin is a product of the Guardian Open Platform, which was first covered on Editors Weblog in May 2009. Unlike the NYTimes syndication system, the Guardian permits commercial use and multiple tiers of license options. In an interview with Journalism.co.uk, Matt McAlister, head of developer network at Guardian Media Group said that:

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-05 18:15

So major UK dailies the Times and Sunday Times have gone behind an online paywall: those wishing to read beyond the homepage will have to register and pay £1 for a day's access, £2 for a week. The sum is not huge but in today's news landscape where online readers jump swiftly and easily between news sources, how many are likely to pay?

The Guardian's Roy Greenslade noted that a column on the Sunday Times' site this weekend had lifted an item from a free website, Gentlemenranters, without giving proper attribution. The editor of Gentelmenranters confirmed to Greenslade that the Sunday paper had not contacted the site. In the world of blogging and linking it has become almost standard practice to refer to the work of others, but citing the source is essential, and when a website is behind a paywall there does seem to be a feeling that it is less justifiable to take content from other sources. Presumably this is because, if people are paying for content, they expect it to be top quality and definitely original.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-05 17:37

With the New York Times' recent decision to let go of its hyper local site in New Jersey, the newspaper has decided to hand over the space to another hyper local site, reports Poynter. Baristanet, which has been growing for nearly 6 years will expand from 90,000 residents to 150,000 with the addition of the Times' audience. The Local, the Times' former local site, covered three towns and will now re-direct all traffic to Baristanet.

The Times' other hyper local experiment in Brooklyn has headed in another direction: the Times' handed it off to CUNY in January. The CUNY blog remains on NYT website, but the blog itself is now under the control of CUNY faculty. This fall, NYT plans to launch another blog with the same model as their CUNY partnership in New York's East Village with the cooperation of New York University.

The New Jersey communities in which the Times had launched its local site hosts one of the most competitive scenes for hyper local news in the US. During its 16 month existence, The Local competed with AOL's Patch in three New Jersey towns. Baristanet, which was active in several nearby local towns, will now compete with AOL's Patch in 5 towns.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-05 15:40

Yahoo has announced that it plans to start using data gleaned from the millions of search terms it processes every day in order to select news stories to cover. Starting Tuesday, Yahoo! will introduce a news blog that will rely on search queries to help guide its reporting and writing on national affairs, politics and the media. Yahoo software continuously tracks common words, phrases and topics that are popular among users across its vast online network. A team of people will analyze those patterns and pass along their findings to Yahoo's news staff of two editors and six bloggers who will use the information to help write the new blog, called The Upshot which will go live tomorrow at news.yahoo.com/upshot.

In an interview with the NYT, James Pitaro, vice president of Yahoo Media, said that "We feel like the differentiator here; what separates us from a lot of our competitors is our ability to aggregate all this data. This idea of creating content in response to audience insight and audience needs is one component of the strategy, but it's a big component."

As an example of the advantages of search technology as a editor, Mr. Pitaro often points to one of the most popular articles to appear on Yahoo's sports news site during the 2008 Summer Olympics.

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-05 15:17

A recent report by Forbes has predicted journalism will become more dependent on technology as mobile devices gain popularity. Writing for Forbes, Trevor Butterworth suggests that with the evolution of 3G, cloud computing, GPS and second-generation barcoding, mobile phones are becoming more like "life devices." Moreover, Butterworth cites a Forrester report that shows reading news is the most popular activity on mobile devices.

Butterworth also notes that a recent analysis by the Yankee Group's Emily Nagel Green showed that US consumers spend an average of $185 per month for phone, Internet and TV services. Clearly, in spite of the strong economic recession, people are still willing to pay top dollar to stay connected to mobile technology. Clearly, Butterworth insists, journalistic news sources would be well-advised to stay current with advances in technology.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-05 13:03

Nicolas Sarkozy has a worrying degree of influence over the French media, according to an article in the Guardian today. Prompted by his "shocking" alleged interference in the recent sale of French daily Le Monde, Guardian writer Kim Willsher looked at the ways in which the French president influenced the media and discussed fears of the "Berlusconisation" of the media.

Sarkozy called in Le Monde's editor-in-chief Eric Fottorino before the sale of the paper to express his concerns about one of the takeover offers, which it seemed he feared might turn the paper against his government. This promptly led to criticism over the level of his involvement and possibly contributed to the takeover offer in question being approved by Le Monde's staff.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-05 12:47

The Malaysian government has suspended the publication of Suara Keadilan, the main opposition newspaper, for "publishing false news that could incite public unrest,"
The Associated Press reported
.

The weekly newspaper, directed by opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim's Keadilan party, last month ran a front-page report revealing that the Federal Land Development Authority was bankrupt, the news site Free Malaysia Today noted.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-05 10:51

The Los Angeles Times recently ran a convincing advertorial claiming that parts of Universal Studios had been destroyed by a mysterious attack, reports Los Angeles Observed. The ad, which was designed to fool readers in thinking it was a legitimate story being reported by LA Times, featured articles with headlines such as "Universal Studios Hollywood Partially Destroyed" and the absurd "Colossal Footprints Found on Beach."

The only indication that the advertorial was in fact fake was the word "advertisement" written in small red letters under the page title that announced the "LATExtra" section. Overall, considering that the advertisement exactly resembles a Times publication with only a tiny indication that it isn't, the advertisement seems to be specifically designed to mislead readers.

The LA Times advertorial has already created a good deal of backlash. Charles Apple, writing for Visual Editors, calls the ad a "four-page wrap in which advertising copy is masquerading as news - once again - in the once-respectable Los Angeles Times." Apple expresses further astonishment at the ad, quoting an "anonymous tipster" who reported that the ad was wrapped around the paper for home subscribers, making the ad the first part of the newspaper subscribers saw when they picked up the morning paper.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-02 16:20

In a 16 minute speech delivered at The Guardian's Activate 2010 summit, Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google since 2001, said that the experience of reading news will move to digital devices quite rapidly - and that it will involve personalized and local news which will be alert to your interests and existing knowledge. Among the numerous trends and shifts pointed about by Schmidt during his speech, one particularly relevant note for the newspaper industry was made in regards to mobile strategy. "Mobile is the hottest area of computer technology," Schmidt said. "The smartest developers now are writing apps for mobile before they write for Windows or Apple Mac desktop operating systems. Part of that is because these devices are hugely personal to us when we use them." Schmidt also addressed paywalls, News Corp. and the future of newspapers.

Asked what he thought of the future of newspapers, Schmidt said: "What does the newsreading experience look like many years from now? I think it's delivered to a digital device, which has text, obviously, but also colour, and video, and the ability to dig very deeply into what you are supplied with. At the moment we have readers, but it's not intelligent enough; newspapers often tell me what I already know. We'll have advertising products that are much more media-centric. The most important thing is that it will be more personalised."

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-02 14:47

The recently-relaunched Times and Sunday Times websites start charging for content today. There is an introductory offer of £1 for 30 days, after that the sites will be £2 a week or £1 a day for those who do not subscribe to the print edition. There is no access beyond the home page for non-subscribers.

The Guardian quoted News International CEO Rebekah Brooks as saying "We have been very pleased with the response from readers since the launch of the new websites in May. The new sites showcase our award-winning journalism in a very visual way, giving readers exclusive content and interactivity so that they can get even more from the news. We believe the new sites offer real value and we look forward to continuing to invest and innovate for readers."

The new sites replace Timesonline.co.uk, which used to be the free online home for content from both papers. The two new websites look more similar to their print counterparts and have a stronger multimedia focus, particular that of the Sunday Times. Many questioned the move to create a separate site for a Sunday paper, which presumably produces less content than the daily paper does, but the company justified the move by saying that the two papers represent two distinct brands.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-02 12:24

Two Texas Hearst-owned newspapers, the Houston Chronicle and the San Antonio Express-News, will work more closely together, reports Poynter. In an office memorandum, Jeff Cohen and Bob Rivard noted that the two newpapers have already been exchanging content for the past year. However, this next move should bring the offices even closer. The memorandum says that the newspapers will develop a stronger partnership through their Business, Sports and Features departments.

The memorandum also announced that a few individuals at the two newspapers will be given wider roles as "Texas Editors," giving them a greater degree of influence at both newspapers. The memorandum also announced that the newly appointed Texas Editors will report to Scott Clark, the project manager for the newspapers' consolidation efforts.

In light of the stronger partnership, the two newspapers do not plan on running the same stories or even emphasizing similar topics. However, they do plan on drawing on the joint resources of the two newspapers and use the partnership to do advanced stories and features that will have a broader appeal.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-02 12:15

Readers in the United Kingdom are willing to pay for print newspapers but not for online content, a YouGov SixthSense report revealed.

Compared with 83 percent of readers that refuse to pay for online news, the study found that two thirds of readers would buy a "good newspaper," NewMediaAge reported. Only 4 percent would be willing to pay for online information if a quality newspaper was not available.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-02 11:09

Sam Zell, owner of the US group Tribune, recently voiced his opinion about the future of newspapers on CNBC, reports the Guardian. Zell, a real estate investor who become a media mogul after acquiring the Tribune Company, said that he believes that home-delivered newspapers are on their way out. During the interview, Zell also touched on why the bankruptcy proceedings of his company have been so difficult.

To replace newspapers, Zell suggested that PDF format documents and (of course) the iPad will eventually fill the gap. Reflecting on the future, Zell said "going forward, it's going to require all kinds of different approaches, including probably most significant, the elimination of home delivery and the replacement of it by PDFs."

However, so far no Tribune owned paper has taken the step toward using PDFs. Yet, PaidContent reports that the Media News-owned News and Gannett-owned Free Press have cut back on home delivery and have instead provided subscribers with a digital version of the paper. However, none of these digital versions are PDFs.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-01 18:54

Social, marketing & media blog The Wall reports that The New York Times has canned one of its largest hyperlocal projects, The Local. The New York Times devoted two full-time reporters to the sites covering Clinton Hill and Fort Greene in Brooklyn and Maplewood, Millburn and South Orange, New Jersey as well as an editor and a number of support and advisory staff journalists when it set the hyperlocal site up last spring.

Yesterday we wrote about the community news blog Freehold InJersey which has launched a coffeeshop newsroom in the centre of the town, to provide a place where the public can meet with journalists to talk about story ideas and the community issues that matter to them. FinJ is run by the Ashbury Park Press and Gannett, and the new newsroom has been opened in conjunction with Zebu Forno Café. It is interesting to see that some hyperlocal projects continue to thrive even when the NYT, with all their expertise, is having trouble turning hyperlocal into a profit centre.

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-01 16:57

The Los Angeles Times and Tribune Interactive have released a new iPad app, reports Editor&Publisher. The app, which costs $1.99 allows readers to keep up with the latest news with headlines, photos, tweets, and a feed of news from L.A. Now blog. According to the L.A. Times website, "users can browse through The Times' individual sections -- including each section's blogs -- and save stories and photos under the Favorites section for later viewing." Users can also use the app to share stories on Facebook, Twitter, and via e-mail.

Moreover, the Times has also launched the next generation of their app which features an adjustable interface for app users to customize how they receive Times content. Publisher Eddy Hartenstein said "Next month, our Hollywood Star Walk app will also go live, offering a robust interactive L.A. -centric experience for visitors to Southern California and entertainment junkies."

Producers of the app hope that it will allow users to be more interactive in how they receive news. According to Tribune Interactive President Marc Chase, the app "adapts to users preferences and makes content just a click away."

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-01 16:24

The Associated Press has designated a leader in its ongoing coverage of the Gulf oil spill, reports The Seattle Times. Oil Spill Editor Steven Gutkin has an extensive repertoire of dealing with disasters, including: 6 years as Jerusalem bureau chief where he reported on the Lebanon war, the Gaza war, suicide bombings, and many others, as well time spent in Caracas, Singapore, and Jakarta. In a press release, AP praised Gutkin, saying "it would be hard to imagine a stronger track record of handling big, complex stories. But we don't have to imagine because we have Steve."

As Oil Spill Editor, Gutkin will be based in Atlanta and will supervise a team of journalists who will likewise write on the oil spill.

Many local journals, including the New Orleans City Business, take many of their stories on the oil spill from Associated Press. City Business further adds to its reporting on the spill with several opinion pieces and a few articles written by local journalists.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-07-01 13:45

ProPublica, leader in the US nonprofit investigative journalism field, has launched a newly redesigned website. "We've tried to take everything we've learned, and everything we've added, and put it together into one nice, clean site," wrote Scott Klein, editor of news applications, in an article on the site.

New elements include a 'story so far' section for each investigation, which summarises the reporting that has been done so far to put the investigation in context for new readers, and a feature inspired by Google's Living Stories that allows readers to more easily see what articles within an investigation that they have or haven't read.

The new site also includes all elements of a story on a single page, regardless of whether it is text or multimedia. "The pages now have interactive boxes at the top that can pull in live data from our news applications; below that there's a running river of stories," wrote Klein. ProPublica's 'Tools & Data,' such as the recovery tracker, or the stimulus speed chart, are all gathered on one page, along with selected interactive news applications.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-01 13:42

Google's latest move in its ongoing campaign to "save the newspaper industry" is the addition of a sophisticated personalization system across all its Google News sites. As the NYT's Nick Bilton explains, "What if you woke up every morning to find a customized newspaper on your doorstep?" The system, called "News for you", offers a stream of local, customized and socially edited content. Google's announcement follows a series of free, powerful, new features that the company has been adding to Google News over the last two years. Past upgrades included the ability to digitally flip swiftly through articles from different sources and a quadrupling of its archive of historic news. See the end of this article for a video walk-through of the "News for You" feature-set.
Google's announcement included the following breakdown of system featues:

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-07-01 12:55

The Portuguese media group Controlinveste this week closed down its free newspaper Global Notícias and the national daily 24 Horas, Newspaper Innovation reported yesterday.

The group announced the closings through an internal memo, according to Diário de Notícias. "The administration justified its decision as the result of a 'deep structural change of the market of the press,' which 'demands strategic decisions that will lead to new business models," the newspaper explained.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-01 11:03


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