WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


June 2010

Dubai's English-language daily Emirates Business 24/7 plans to shut down its print edition and convert to an electronic-only newspaper in mid-July, GulfNews.com reported.

Publications generally close or reduce the days in which their print product appears due to financial reasons; however, the order to shutter the print version completely and go online-only comes from orders issued by Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, deputy ruler of Dubai and Board Chairman of Dubai Media Incorporated (DMI). Financial reasons were not given.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-24 11:10

ImpreMedia, the largest Spanish-language online and print news publisher in the US, has decided to partner with behavioral tracking specialists at DailyMe in an attempt to more fully capitalize on the internet traffic passing through ImpreMedia's servers, according to a press release. The solution that has just been deployed is known as Newstogram and it combines unique profiles on more than 25 million users to improve news relevancy and personalization to engage the readers and improve their experience.

The Newstogram system operates transparently in front of ImpreMedia's news sites, tracking and analyzing the news users read at a elemental level to understand each particular visitor's tastes and purchasing patterns. The software does not gather personally identifiable details about users. The information with this process enables ImpreMedia to both offer individualized news recommendations based on each user's news interests, and to more fully understand their audience when it comes to content, e-commerce and advertising.

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-06-23 18:09

Foursquare, arguably the hottest, heavily-courted, high-tech startup since Twitter, has just inked (no pun intended) a deal with the most widely-read newspaper in the US, The Wall Street Journal. A selection of WSJ.com articles (NYC restaurant reviews and other local cultural coverage) now include an "Add to Foursquare" button. As TechCrunch astutely notes, "one surefire way to know that a service is doing well is when you see their buttons start appearing all over the web. We've seen it with Facebook, we've seen it with Twitter (Tweetmeme buttons), and now we're going to start seeing it with Foursquare".
The most basic purpose of the feature is to enable readers to obtain contact and condensed review information for a destination that they happen to read about on WSJ. Foursquare's elevator pitch is that it can be used "to create "To Do" lists of all the things you want to experience. Keep track of restaurants to go to, bands to see or art exhibits to check out." This is complimented by social-networking functionality which enables groups of friends to find out about new restaurants or hotspots through the system.

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-06-23 17:45

The candidate must monitor adherence to journalism ethics. He or she should be prepared to examine large editorial slip-ups, discrepancies and omissions and do all this in a completely transparent auditable manner open to pubic input or scrutiny. Arthur Brisbane's job description includes all of the above and a lot more (like a regular column). He has just been appointed to the role of public editor for the New York Times. Brisbane replaces Clark Hoyt whose three-year contract ended earlier this month. Brisbane is only the fourth person to fill the role since its inception as part of the response to the Jayson Blair scandal. In his first remarks as NYT public editor, Brisbane hints at some fundamental shifts in the focus of the role as he envisions it.
In the NYT today, Executive Editor Bill Keller discusses the history of the role. He writes that "[t]he general suspicion of the press has not abated in the years since Dan Okrent took the first turn at this job, nor has our determination to hold ourselves to the highest standards in journalism. Offering the readers an advocate, someone who has the experience, the skills and the license to study our work and pass impartial judgments on it, is a demonstration of our commitment to those standards."

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-06-23 17:05

A recent poll has revealed the news sources that Americans most trust, reports Reuters. And surprisingly, traditional media ended up on the bottom of the list, under social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. Nearly half of the 2,100 adults surveyed said they trusted the three big technology firms (Google, Apple, and Microsoft), while 8 and 13 percent trusted Twitter and Facebook, respectively. Only 8 percent of adults and 6 percent of young adults said they trusted traditional media.

John Zogby, President and CEO of Zogby International, the conductors of the survey, said companies like Facebook and Twitter have not had the time to build a brand identity. Meanwhile companies like Google and Apple are more trusted because they have been able to build a corporate identity.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-23 16:13

USA Today president and publisher Dave Hunke, recently announced they would be reorganizing the paper, reports Gannett Blog. Most shockingly for the publication's staff, the reorganization will include layoffs. USA Today, which in April reported a 13.6 percent decrease in circulation over six months, has been under increasing pressure to revive their newspaper sales. Moreover, Today's advertising revenue fell 11 percent during the first quarter, while the overall decline amongst Gannett's (owner of USA Today) other papers was 8 percent.

Hunke announced the upcoming restructuring and layoffs at a staff meeting last week, however he did not include a timetable or details about the upcoming changes. One anonymous commentator on Gannett's blog expressed frustration over the manner in which Hunke shared the news, saying "either Hunke buried the lede or he has so little regard for us that he just plumb forgot to mention the fact that some of us are going to be laid off, and soon." Hunke reportedly waited until the post-meeting Q&A session to share the news about the layoffs.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-23 12:35

What is a newsroom? Offices, computer terminals, journalists, talent, an ambition to belong to the "Fourth Estate"? A bit of all of that, but particularly a collective intelligence that manages to produce quality information within a given time frame. This type of intelligence, founded on the gathering together of individual talents at a single location, is confronted today by a three-fold threat:
- the crisis in the newspaper industry that is leading to job cuts,
- technology that allows the creation of other forms of collective intelligence, e.g. in networks,
- readers and users who contest the monopoly of power of the journalists and want to act as players in the information production process.

A certain type of newsroom has existed for the last two hundred years - from the beginning of the 19th century - but this model is dying before our very eyes and we are struggling to envisage what the newsroom in the year 2020 or 2030 will look like. In order to obtain a clearer picture, a distinction must be made between three phases in the design and organisation of newsrooms.

1) The pyramid model

Author

Bertrand Pecquerie's picture

Bertrand Pecquerie

Date

2010-06-23 11:37

Following the iPad's big splash into the tablet market this spring, today Amazon cut the price of its e-reader, the Kindle, while Barnes & Noble reduced the price of its Nook.

Both e-readers previously sold for US$259. Now, the Nook's pricetag is $199 and the Kindle is $189; Barnes & Noble has also launched a Wi-Fi-only Nook for $149. Comparatively, the iPad's lowest-priced version is $499.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com
See also Nintendo 3D game device to support digital newspapers and magazines

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-23 11:07

While much of the news industry is facing serious problems in the face of the looming digital age of the media, Japan appears to be having the exact opposite problem. The New York Times reports that the failure of JanJan News, an online news source in Japan, indicated Japan's resistance to online media. "JanJan was the last of four online newspapers offering reader-generated articles that were started with great fanfare here," writes Martin Fackler, "but they have all closed or had to scale back their operations in the past 2 years."

JanJan was an online news sources that offered reader-generated articles. Although the site started with a great amount of hype, it has been unable to sustain itself. Yet, the problem is not the citizen journalism aspect of the news site--no online journal has been able to succeed in Japan.

Despite the growing threat of digital media take-over in other parts of the world, Japan's media landscape has remained untouched, and JanJan is just one example. JanJan's president and founder Ken Takeuchi says "Japan just wasn't ready yet. This is a hard place to create an alternative source of news."

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-22 17:41

Bloomberg News is doing things a little differently. In stark contrast to media heavyweights such as The Wall Street Journal, The Times of London and The New York Times, Bloomberg has launched a fresh version of its business news website supported solely by ads rather than subscription fees. A free-content approach to news provision would seem to be a departure from the company's traditional revenue model which revolves around selling subscriptions to its Bloomberg Terminals data feeds at the price of $1500/month.

In addition to its free business news offerings, minOnline reports that Bloomberg is set to become "the only major news provider to make accessible online a live feed of its TV broadcasts. A TV tab from the home page lands the users on a large media player running the current programming from Bloomberg Television as well as a library of recent clips and interviews."

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-06-22 17:21

On Monday, CNN announced that it has decided to end its contract with Associated Press, Yahoo News reports. CNN spokesman Nigel Pritchard claimed that the terms AP offered "did not fit our business model" but offered no other reason for the split. In its statement, Associated Press likewise did not offer a reason, only saying "it is unfortunate that CNN's viewers will no longer have access to the breaking news and worldwide reporting resources of The Associated Press."

However, the split from AP seems to be a point of pride for CNN president Jim Walton. Walton told his employees through a memo on Monday that in light of their split from AT "the content we offer will be distinctive, compelling and, I am proud to say, our own."

Associated Press is a global news company that provides stories to thousands of news sources in the US alone. They have, however, been facing increasing pressure from their subscribers to decrease their fees in light of the advertising slump and other industry problems. In response to these complaints, the AP has decreased their fees in recent years.

One of AP's over-seas competitors, Agence France-Presse, has also faced similar problems in recent years: in June 2009, the French regional paper La Provence dropped the AFP.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-22 14:14

The San Francisco Public Press, a web-based news source, will go to print, reports the San Francisco Chronicle. The Press, a nonprofit news source that has been reporting local issues online since 2009, plans to print a twenty page main section accompanied by an eight page pull out. The Chronicle notes that this move by the Public Press is "bucking a national trench whereby startup, nonprofit news Web sites sprout online and stay in cyberspace."

The Public Press is starting out slow, as this Tuesday's issue will be the last for several months. However, Michael Stoll, the Public Press' executive director, expressed a hope that the print format will one day become daily. For now, the paper does not include advertisements, but Stoll hopes that Tuesday's publication will attract more subscribers.

The publication is described as"grassroots," with its contributors being primarily local journalists who are "frustrated by what they see as the diminished Bay Area news coverage." The first issue will include 70 stories including several opinion pieces. Public Press volunteers will distribute the paper on street corners and in BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) stations where it will cost $2.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-22 12:58

New nonprofit California Watch just announced the launch of a new website called Politics Verbatim, which will "attempt to track every quote, promise and statement made by our two major candidates for governor in California - Democrat Jerry Brown and Republican Meg Whitman," according to a blog post by CW editorial director Mark Katches.

Since March 2010 the site has collected 293 documents which it has broken down into 1026 excerpts, and it allows readers to search these using various different filters, including type of statement, who made it, on what topic, and where. It will also include blog posts from CW reporters and editors.

"We will be adding to the site daily, scouring news and campaign sites and Twitter and Facebook feeds," the blog post says, adding that the site is also encouraging other journalists and readers to contribute. The site is looking into creating additional partnerships with other media outlets and "with help from others and from our media partners, we believe we can build a useful, relevant tool in a critical election year."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-22 12:55

The eight largest newspapers in Ohio have recently joined forces to research the state's public pension system, reports Editor&Publisher. By coming together, the newspapers were able to identify thousands of public employees who are collecting pensions while still working and receiving paychecks, a procedure known as "double dipping." The study found that about 32,000 state and local employees collected more than $1 billion in pensions on top of their paychecks. The beneficiaries of "double-dipping" are mostly school superintendents and highly paid educators.

However, this is not a new move for Ohio newspapers, which have collaborated in a similar fashion in the past. Rather than using an expensive newswire service like the Associated Press, Ohio newspapers previously decided to form their own cooperative, called the Ohio News Organization. The eight participating newspapers are the Akron Beacon Journal, The Blade of Toledo, the Canton Repository, the Cincinnati Enquirer, the Columbus Dispatch, the Dayton Daily News, the Plain Dealer of Cleveland, and the Vindicator.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-22 11:41

Google is building a paid content system, and has been reaching out to publishers to find out how willing they are to try out the service, called Newspass, La Repubblica reported Thursday.

The platform is already being tested, and would allow users to buy access to content with just one click, while publishers would be able to use the same infrastructure for all platforms - PCs, mobile and tablet, according to the report, which Google would not confirm.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-21 19:56

Iceland has passed a package of legislation that intends to make the country an international safe haven for investigative journalists, it was reported by the AFP and the Independent among others. The new laws, created with the help of Wikileaks, were passed unanimously in the Icelandic parliament at 4am on Wednesday last week.

The Icelandic Modern Media Initiative was first proposed in February, by which time Julian Assange, founder and editor of whistleblower site Wikileaks, had already been consulting with MPs for two months on the proposal to implement some of the strongest protection in the world for the press and its sources. The idea is that the new package will also help bring an end to libel tourism, and make it much harder to censor stories before they are published.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-21 13:22

A recent survey in the UK reveals that the media industry is perceived as "cut-throat" and one of the hardest to break into, reports journalism.co.uk. The study, which had a strong focus on people from ethnic minority backgrounds, was conducted by the Business in the Community Charity through its Race for Opportunity campaign. The survey included 1,469 people from a range of ethnic backgrounds including Indian, white British, white mixed race, Pakistani, and black Caribbean. The participants were asked about eight major professions: politics, armed forces, police, medicine, banking/finance, legal/law, education, and media.

Thirty-one percent of the respondents said they thought the media industry was a difficult profession in which to find employment. The report showed that white Britons were markedly less interested in a media career than other ethnic respondents and thirty-four percent of respondents believed the media to be "cut-throat."

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-21 13:07

The Huffington Post has recently acquired Adaptive Semantics, company whose software provides "learning and sentiment analysis" to the HuffPo, reports PaidContent. HuffPo had already been working with Adaptive Semantics to make online comments sections safe for advertisements by filtering offensive language and patterns of behavior used to evade censors. However HuffPo CEO Eric Hippeau assures that this acquisition (HuffPo's first) does not signal a future buying spree for the company. "We'll be opportunistic," says Hippeau. "We're not looking but if there are things that are important to us, as demonstrated with Adaptive Semantics" HuffPo would consider it.

In May, the HuffPo reported their website had produced 2.8 million comments. Clearly, Adaptive Semantics technology will be important to the future of the HuffPo as its comments sections continue to expand. "We have built a whole road map for continuing the develop capability," Hippeau says. However, Hippeau added that he does not intent to offer Adaptive Semantics' technology commercially, although he will maintain any pre-existing commitments to clients.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-21 12:00

The New York Times plans to set up a public beta site on which it can experiment and test its ideas and applications before they go live on the newspaper's website, AdAge.com reported. The beta initiative will begin in July or August, and will be called "Beta620," wherein 620 refers to the paper's street address on Eighth Avenue in New York.

The new platform will be an examination ground for The Times to study and understand the impact of its features on readers and advertisers before they are implemented, thereby facilitating more user involvement with its products, while eliminating the clutter of new products on its main site, according to a blog posted on MediaBistro.com.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-21 10:39

It is no secret that sales of classifieds in print publications has been spiraling down for many years now, and with no end in sight. That is precisely why our sister site, SFN Blog paid careful attention to the news that a group of U.S. newspaper and broadcast TV news websites have allied to create a national online listing and auction site, boocoo, which is aimed to compete against Craigslist and eBay. The Editors Weblog got in touch with Tony Marsella, president of boocoo's parent company, Ranger Data Technologies, to find out what this new revenue model might mean for the newspapers and classified advertising sales.

Upon logging in to the boocoo preview website (a sneak-peek account details at the bottom of this article) users are greeted with a very clean, intuitive interface that will feel familiar and easy for anyone who has bought or sold items online before. The one key difference in terms of aesthetics is that once the site goes live, there will be customized, branded pages that will ease users from their local newspaper's website onto the boocoo site. The revenue model employed here is to license zip-codes to more than 300 newspaper publishers, such as The Boston Herald and Austin American-Statesman, with a total print audience of 22 million readers.

Author

Colin Heilbut

Date

2010-06-18 18:30

The New York Times, The Bay Citizen, and Next Door Media have recently formed partnerships with local universities, reports Poynter. The publications hope the partnerships will help them expand their hyperlocal coverage, engage new audiences, and experiment with different business models. Moreover, says Jay Rosen, who helped to create the partnership between NYU and the Arthur J. Carter Journalism Institute, the partnerships are "correcting a misalignment between journalism schools and the news business."

The partnerships have been formed through "hinges," people who have relationships with both the university and the news organisation. In the case of the New York Times and NYU partnership, the hinge is Richard Jones, former NYT reporter and current member of NYU's faculty. To emphasize the importance of hinges, Rosen says "you have to have an elegant hinge so that the problems of coordinating two institutions don't overwhelm you. The Times can be confident that this site was done to the Times' standards, and we can be confident that we have an editor on hand right here."

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-18 14:22

The University of Missouri's Reynolds Journalism Institute has recently announced the inauguration of WellCommons, a site designed to improve community communication about health issues. Jane Stevens, Director of Media Strategies at the Institute, hopes that WellCommons will connect health reporters to the public to more effectively communicate health reports. Moreover, she believes that WellCommons is a good example of successful journalism in a social media world. In describing her new site, she says "some people say it's a touch of WordPress, a little bit of Ning, some Facebook and Twitter, all embedded in a safe place and a trusted source, which is what journalism is supposed to be for a community."

Stevens writes that the site is unique in 5 ways. To begin, it integrates social media with journalism. Both reporters and community members post on the website and communicate with one another via messages. Moreover, Stevens maintains that the site allows for users to determine the credibility of the article they are reading by looking at the sources section. Stevens' approach appears to be like a sort of checks-and-balances system where the format itself will hopefully ensure that the majority of posts on the site are coming from legitimate sources. Also, she argues that WellCommons' approach to health reporting is community-based and solution-oriented.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-17 17:04

The Knight Foundation recently announced the winners of its 2010 Knight News Challenge, reports ReadWriteWeb. The contest offers awards for innovative ideas concerning how news is distributed to communities using digital technologies. This year, 12 entrants were awarded $2.74 million with the largest sum ($400,000) going to Eric Rodenbeck who designed a data visualization project called CityTracking. Rodenbeck hopes his project will help facilitate the process of creating visual representations of municipal data. The Knight Foundation description says, "CityTracking will allow users to create embedded data visualizations that are appealing enough to spread virally and that are as easy to share as photos and videos."

The second place entry, called Tilemapping, was likewise aimed at digital visualization. Other project topics included reader engagement and journalistic funding at local levels. The foundation hopes their encouragement of new ideas through its News Challenge will instigate innovative thinking and allow for journalism to move forward into the age of digital media. "We can use the Knight News Challenge to experiment with ways to learn how to think in different ways about information sharing so we might discover the future of news," says Knight Foundation President, Alberto Ibargüen.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-17 12:21

A recent poll reports that 23 percent of The Times online users have said that they are "likely" to pay for the new online format, reports PaidContent. Within that 23 percent, 4 percent were "extremely likely," 2 percent were "very likely," 4 percent "fairly likely," and 13 percent "somewhat likely." Also, 76 percent of those polled said they were not likely to pay at all. These results are particularly encouraging for the publication, as it was predicted The Times would lose a staggering portion of their readership as a consequence of its paywall. In addition to the 4 percent of people who are very likely to subscribe once the Times goes behind a paywall, PaidContent notes that "nearly a fifth of Times Online readers . . . may be persuadable to at least some occasional form of payment."

Moreover, the preferred subscription method for those who are very likely to subscribe is the £2-a-week option. Fortunately for The Times, this option automatically renews itself every seven days, meaning that it will give The Times a consistent flow of revenue.

Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-06-16 16:25


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