WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 20.08.2014


April 2010

As the Wall Street Journal plans to launch its new 10-page metro edition today, with the admitted purpose of competing directly with the New York Times, analysts everywhere are asking why.

The Journal's metro launch will cost it $30 million over the next two years, and the paper is not particularly prized by locals for its New York city coverage. But this move comes as an obvious extension of what has been an ongoing battle against the New York Times since Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. bought Dow Jones, the WSJ's parent company, in 2007.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-26 15:05

The iPad currently makes up 26 percent of Wired.com's traffic from mobile devices, the technology site reported less than three weeks after the device's launch.

Although mobile accounts for just between 2.3 percent and 3.5 percent of overall traffic, the high number of iPad users suggests most are those who already used the iPhone and iPod Touch, as those users are declining the same amount the iPad user numbers are rising.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-26 12:08

Back in February, business journalist Michelle Leder sold her obscure website about the financial disclosures that publicly held companies are required to file with the Securities and Exchange Commission to Morningstar, the giant Chicago-based publisher that sells nearly $500 million a year in research and advisory services to large and small investors.

Her rise from blogger to businesswoman shows that journalists no longer need to be part of an established news outlet to build a remunerative career. Entrepreneurial journalism can indeed be very lucrative, but in order for journalists to cash in on their work, they must first "think like a businessperson," media consultant and Poynter contributor Dorian Benkoil told Poynter during a meeting this week.
Benkoil suggests that entrepreneurial journalists keep an eye on their money because "cash makes the difference." The cash flow is key to determining whether a website will make it or not. Journalists should also focus on how fast they're getting paid and that they get paid on time.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-23 18:35

As print papers collapse and move their operations online, the advantages of online-only publications become increasingly clear. But there are also some things that print newspapers are capable of which are difficult for online operations. This was the subject of a discussion between Pulitzer-prize-winning former Boston Globe journalist Walter Robinson and Clay Shirky, an expert on the interactions between the internet and the media held at the Shorenstein Center at Harvard University this week.

Robinson broke the kind of story that Shirky feels is not possible for online news organizations. He led a team of Boston Globe reporters who filed a series in 2001 on the priest abuse scandal that led to corrective action taken by the Catholic Church. Shirky feels that online publications don't have the necessary resources to waste, the time to spend, or the institutional presence to back them up, reports Nieman Journalism Lab.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-23 18:17

Outsourcing photography may cut financial costs but incur costs in quality. [Journalism.co.uk]

Maybe newspaper websites are finally catching on--they drew record traffic numbers in the first quarter of 2010. [Editor&Publisher]

Mobile audiences likely make up a large portion of newspaper readers, and now newspapers can find out how much. [paidContent]

Breaking from tradition, the Guardian asks readers who it should endorse for the UK elections. [Guardian]

Mashable, the social media news site, will now offer content to print publication Metro International. [Journalism.co.uk]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-23 17:42

Google's position as a top news site traffic driver has put some editors between a rock and a hard place -- should they take the leap to remove their content from Google and risk losing readers? Or should they allow the Internet giant to benefit from disaggregating their content?

Writing for Paid Content, media and internet consultant Arnon Mishkin offered news publishers a reality check: "Google is much less important than you think."

Mishkin argues that media executives think their ability to sell bundled content is dead and that their best bet is to let Google disaggregate their content and use it in exchange for links. Besides, saying no to Google, the current number one driver of readers to news sites, could have disastrous consequences on traffic.
However, Mishkin believes that the data does not support media executives' arguments. Firstly, he defends the selling content in a bundle model, through either an iPhone or iPad app, and secondly, newspaper sites have been very successful at building core audiences that keep coming back.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-23 17:07

Few are as successful as the Huffington Post by their fifth birthday.

In five short years of existence, the web publication doubled its staff to 100, expanded its site to include a number of local and niche news pages, and most recently received 13 million unique visitors during the month of March. In honor of its May 9 birthday, Newsonomics media blogger Ken Doctor wrote a post for the Nieman Journalism Lab outlining exactly what it is that makes the Huffington Post so successful.

His six points all highlight what's unique about HuffPo, starting with its brand--the Huffington Post stands for "a high-pitched way of thinking about the world," he writes, and Arianna Huffington has never backed down from her feisty liberal assertions. The website is known for liberally partisan news, but Huffington is not apologetic about this fact, and it still manages to increase viewership year after year--up 94% in just the last 12 months.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-23 14:07

Henri Pigeat, former president of Agence France Presse and current president of CFPJ (Centre de Formation et de Perfectionnement des Journalistes) revealed in a video interview with daily French paper Le Figaro that the AFP would be needing between €130 and €150 million for the next five years. The figures consist of estimations and Pigeat noted that there was no concrete business plan yet.

Financial backing might incorporate stockholders' equity as well as funding from within AFP. Pigeat said the sum was "reasonable" and would be necessary to promote technological evolution. He added that today's news agencies functioned on a variety of interactive multimedia platforms with hypertext, which subsequently indicated that there must be both an IT-based and an editorial transformation.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-23 11:13

Online ad revenue is up at the New York Times and the print ad decline is slowing. Maybe that's one of the reasons publishers are so optimistic. [paidContent, Editor&Publisher]

News aggregation site Newsy.com has released a one-stop news iPad app. [TechCrunch]

The revamped Independent had an eventful day, as James Murdoch stormed into its newsroom and Boots stopped offering issues for free. [Guardian]

As ash continues to keep them stranded in European airports, journalists continue to file their stories. [Hold the Front Page]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-22 19:33

Although entrepreneurial blog sites are old hat in the United States, they are just hitting the scene in the UK and are quickly gaining momentum, reports the Independent.

The trend towards professional online news sites unrelated to established print papers started in the US and has since seen the foundation of multimillion dollar sites like the Huffington Post or the Gawker media sites. The Independent's Ian Burrell calls the UK versions of sites like these "expertly written websites that cater for the specialist audiences that are arguably no longer being served as they once were by more traditional media organisations."

Burrell cites recently founded niche website The Arts Desk as an example of this trend. The Arts Desk offers readers professional arts criticism from journalists formerly or currently employed by well-established papers, and aims to have the site updated by 2 am after opening performances--much quicker than most newspapers publish.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-22 19:11

The National Council for the Training of Journalists announced today that it will launch a new Diploma in Journalism to replace its preliminary Certificate in Journalism, reports Hold the Front Page.

The new diploma will feature seven elements, like the past certificate, with five core subjects and two options students can choose from. Students will have to take reporting, multimedia portfolio, shorthand, essential public affairs, and essential media law.

This qualification, widely recognized among media circles and employers, has been preparing for a facelift since 2008.
The chairman of the NCTJ's qualifications board and Sunday Post editor, Donald Martin, told delegates at the launch of the new Diploma that journalists "now operate in a multimedia world. The boundaries between journalism sectors are no longer distinct."

"Employers like me are demanding multi-skilled journalists. And students, who are full of enthusiasm for this new world, want multimedia training, and multimedia NCTJ qualifications."

The NCTJ's qualification change proves just how deeply technology is changing the face of journalism.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-22 18:37

Facebook is indeed a force to be reckoned with, as it proved at yesterday's f8 conference by launching a number of wide-reaching additions to the social networking site. The additions, including something they've named the Open Graph and various tools called Social Plugins for third-party websites, will integrate Facebook into the fabric of the web "so people can have instantly social experiences wherever they go," said Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

What are the changes?

The Social Plugins and the Open Graph Facebook has created support each other. Now, sites will be able to offer plugins on their pages to allow users to "like" the content, and this content will be instantly published on their Facebook news feeds.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-22 17:44

Last week, the former European correspondent for Newsday, Roy Gutman, was awarded the key to the city of Sarajevo as well as honorary citizenship to honor him for his reporting of ethnic cleansing by Bosnian Serbs during the 1992-1995 war.

"I'm walking on air," Gutman told Media Gaggle. "It's a terrific honor."

His coverage of the Bosnian war exposed a network of concentration camps run by Bosnian Serbs where mostly Muslim Bosnians were beaten, raped, and often killed. His reporting drew international attention to the Bosnian conflict and led to the closing of a number of these concentration camps. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that these closures saved 5,000 to 6,000 lives.

Gutman's coverage won him much international acclaim, as well as a slew of journalistic awards, including a Pulitzer Prize. But, by 2006, Newsday, which once had half a dozen international bureaus, was moving to close most of them. Gutman soon left the paper, and Newsday, which once had half a dozen international bureaus, shut down its last international bureau in 2007.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-22 17:35

For several months now the media industry has been captivated by The Wall Street Journal's decision to wage an all out media war against The New York Times' dominance in the New York City metropolitan area. As the clear underdog, industry insider's have relentlessly theorized over what strategies the WSJ will use against the NYT. In an article written for The Business Insider, Gillian Reagan uses new data to float her belief that women readers might be a deciding factor in the WSJ's battle for NYC.

Using recent data taken from AdAge, Gillian shows that male readers account for 62.3% of the WSJ's readers while female readers make up the remaining 37.7% of readership. In contrast, the NYT has a nearly equal split of female and male readers. The demographics certainly seem to support the historic perception of the WSJ as having what Gillian describes as a "boys' club atmosphere."

One would think that if the WSJ has any hope of gaining ground in against the Times, it will need to make a greater effort to appeal to women. Yet the WSJ does not seem particularly concerned about addressing female interests.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-22 15:17

The founder of virtual marketplace eBay is stepping into the news business, aiming to launch a news site that will do what other news publishers are struggling with: getting people to pay for news, The Associated Press reported today.

Honolulu-based billionaire Pierre Omidyar will launch a news site called "Honolulu Civil Beat," which will be home to community news in Hawaii. Users will be required to pay to discuss issues, ideas and exchange information about matters affecting their communities. Civilbeat.com goes live today with an official launch scheduled for May 4, and plans to charge US$19.99 for monthly membership.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-22 11:18

Reuters plans to rehaul its website and calls paying for content a "sensible" idea. [Brand Republic]

Alan Mutter offers advice on getting people to pay for news: it doesn't matter what paid model you choose, what matters is the uniqueness of the content you produce. [Newsosaur]

Bill Gates talks about journalism, social media, and friending 13-year-old Phillipino girls on Facebook. [San Francisco Gate]

Is a blog post worth less than an article? Forbes thinks so--it's looking for business bloggers to blog for free. [Gawker]

At the 4th Annual Reva and David Logan Investigative Reporting Symposium, consensus on the solution to journalism's problems couldn't be found. [Media Shift]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-21 19:37

On Friday Reuters.co.uk will roll out its new look website, paidContent:UK has reported. In doing so, it will follow Reuters' US website, which underwent a similar facelift four months ago; a move met with approval, particularly from the all-important advertisers. Since the December revamp Reuters.com has seen a 20 percent increase in "engagement" confirms General manager of Reuter's UK digital business, Tim Faircliff.

No doubt the UK site has similar ambitions, and is also looking to distinguish itself from rival site, Bloomberg.

The Reuter's website differs from other services offered by the newswire, in that unlike the majority of its other services which are aimed squarely at the corporate world, reuters.co.uk is a free website, attracting substantial traffic from outside this arena, making it an attractive host for advertising.

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-04-21 18:35

Among the news outlets to win Pulitzer prizes last week, the Bristol Herald Courier, a rural publication from Bristol, Virginia stood out from the rest. In a feature for The Huffington Post, Jane Podesta praises the publication's determinism while large news outlets such as The New York Times and The Washington Post keep "groaning about cutbacks."

Podesta's examination of the Herald Courier's work ethic and office environment supports growing evidence that quality reporting can be achieved with less. As a "hungry young reporter," Daniel Gilbert's only experience with investigative journalism consisted of a weeklong crash course in the subject. Yet somehow, after being emailed a tip for a story, Gilbert managed to conduct an extensive investigation into a natural gas company taking advantage of local farmers that ended up winning him and the Courier a Pulitzer in public service reporting.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-21 18:33

Embedded war journalists attempt to experience and appreciate all the hardships of a soldier while still adhering to journalistic standards. On the battlefield, this is a difficult task, as normally bright ethical lines become blurred in the face of death and injury. Embedded Associated Press reporter Christopher Torchia considered some of the unique hardships of his particular brand of journalism in a recent article for the news agency.

"For journalists, the questions begin with the decision to leave home and head into a combat zone," he writes. "They have the choice, unlike many soldiers who accept grave risk as the institutional trade-off in a military career that can provide education, stability and adventure."

Torchia, who is embedded with a division of the U.S. Army in Afghanistan, wrote that the decision to report on the battlefield can often seem selfish, as though war journalists are ignoring the wishes of their friends and families to go risk their lives for the thrill. But for him, Torchia says, "it's curiosity, the desire to experience, push boundaries, and witness the intensity of the connection between life and death."

That intensity results in an often morbid experience for the uninitiated, with soldiers joking about losing a limb or their lives in a strikingly flippant way. "After a while," he writes, "tasteless makes sense."

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-21 16:53

The European Federation of Journalists is mad as hell and they're not gonna take it anymore. Take what? What they see as favoritism shown by the European Union governments of other cultural ventures, like music, dance, and arts, over journalism.

"Governments across the bloc are very comfortable with funding art galleries, theatre, ballet and opera in the interest of cultural pluralism," said EFJ general secretary Aidan White at their annual meeting on Tuesday. "They should not shy away from similar funding to protect information pluralism."

The EFJ asserts that, because of the recent crisis in the media world and low advertising sales that continue to flatline, EU journalists are having trouble keeping the quality of journalism high and consistent. In hopes to save their publications, newspapers tend to lower their standards, White claims.
"Employers are throwing standards out the window in the battle for readers and audiences, meaning more celebrity journalism and less coverage of local government, fewer foreign bureaux and so on," he said.

And, according to EFJ president Arne König, the lower quality of journalism may also affect democracy.

"A toxic mix of editorial cuts, precarious working conditions and unethical journalism has created a spiral of decline for media and democracy in Europe," he said at the meeting.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-21 13:59

Top news organisations will collaborate to publish a series of articles on how American businesses are responding to liabilities, risks and opportunities surrounding climate change, Foliomag reports. The Atlantic, Mother Jones and Wired, along with Slate, Grist, the Center for Investigative Reporting and PBS current-affairs program "Need to Know" have teamed up to launch Climate Desk, a project dedicated to exploring climate change issues.

This collaboration represents an important step towards resolving the difficulty of covering expansive topics under dwindling resources. Climate Desk hopes to reach a combined online audience of more than 25 million monthly unique visitors, 1.5 million print readers and an expected TV audience of 1.5 viewers.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

A session at the 17th World Editors Forum in Beirut in June will discuss the question "Is journalism going green?" For more information on the World Editors Forum and World Newspaper Congress see www.wanlebanon2010.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-21 11:08

Bloomberg is the latest news organization to attempt to take a bite out of the WSJ readership with a redesigned website. Bloomberg.com has ditched its old black and amber for a more traditional black text on a white screen look, reports Business Insider.

With its makeover, Bloomberg aims to position itself as the only financial news destination online. Its website's new layout combines Bloomberg's financial data, breaking news, commentary, with aggregated economic news stories from other sources. Media Bistro observes that the new layout and the colors make Bloomberg look more geared to average, everyday readers than financiers. Maybe Media Bistro is referring to the new layout's reliance of a vast array of images, rather than simply text and graphs, on its front page.
The financial data and news company, which already is a profitable operation, aims to give its main competitors, the Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times, some stiff competition with a redesigned website.

Kevin Krim, head of Bloomberg.com, told Business Insider that its website needed "a new platform, a new palette, a new canvasto deliver a must-use site for news throughout the day, every week" in order to grow its global audience.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-04-20 19:40

Funding for in-depth and investigative reporting gets promiscuous. [Nieman Lab]

In hopes to increase digital income, the Telegraph creates a "digital operations unit." [Press Gazette]

NPR looks to embed its content in websites across the internet. [Journalism 2.0]

New journalism program will offer a "unique blend of digital storytelling, social media and the business of digital media." [Lost Remote]

As the old business model for news collapses, the Daily Mail suggests newspapers find new ways to measure reader engagement. [Press Gazette]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-20 19:37

With just one day on newspaper stands across the UK, the verdict on the revamped Independent design is still out. Press Gazette editor Dominic Ponsford called it "an improvement from the 2008 relaunch," whereas the Independent's former associate design editor, Michael Crozier, who led the paper through three previous re-designs, lamented that "in the redesigned, re-configured, paper news seems once again to have taken a backwards step."

The paper now has a re-configured front page, new fonts inside, and a highly designed 20-page Viewspaper section, which features analysis and commentary, as well as reviews, letters, and obituaries. The use of the Sun font on the inside has been regarded as the Indy's attempt to shift its focus to more serious journalism, and current editor-in-chief and managing director Simon Kellner has made no effort to deny this.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-20 19:02


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