WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 25.10.2014


April 2010

The managing director of Guardian News and Media defends Murdoch's paywalls, saying they're to "defend his print subscriptions." [New Statesman]

A Pennsylvania newspaper closes its online forums due to widespread racism. [ ]

Stevie Spring of Future Publishing sees a future for magazines--as collector's items. [Press Gazette]

Financial Times sees continued growth in its ad revenue. [Guardian]

Should there be more outrage over the raid of Gizmodo editor Jason Chen's house? [Online Journalism Review]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-30 16:46

Just weeks after Facebook announced its new web-wide integration tools, news websites are putting Like buttons to the test in a number of different ways, with varying degrees of success. Poynter's Mallory Jean Tenore spoke with journalists at the websites of ABC News, ESPN, the Washington Post and CNN to learn more about how news sites are using these new Facebook tools.

Most sites now offer "Like" buttons on all of their articles, though ESPN chose to add the button to certain parts and not others.

"We've only just really begun figuring out how to make this work," said ESPN.com editor-in-chief Rob King. "I think what we want to do is make sure we're making it as easy as possible for folks."
ESPN hopes to gauge user response before it moves forward with a larger implementation. But most sites have seen a positive response, with ABC News reporting an over 250 percent increase in site referrals from Facebook since it started using the social networking tools.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-30 15:58

The Associated Press announced Thursday that it suffered serious losses in revenue and profit in 2009, but it also underscored the fact that it won't take the declines lying down. During its annual meeting the news agency announced the expansion of its AP Gateway initiative through the launch of their News Registry and a niche website for college football fans.

The bleak financial records included a nearly 10 percent drop in revenue, now down to $676.1 million, and a 65 percent fall in net income, bringing it to $8.8 million. Much of this was the result of offering lower rates to its member newspapers, who were also suffering from reduced revenue as a result of the media crisis.

To alleviate some of the pressure created by falling revenues, the AP cut staff and dropped its payroll expenses by 10 percent last year, and managed to cut debt by $1 million in 2009. But as the Board of the AP announced on Thursday, it also plans to innovate to find new sources for revenue.

The AP hopes to take better advantage of search engines and lessen its dependence on third-party sites by making its product more versatile and easily distributable across a wide range of media.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-30 14:17

Aiming to make the Huffington Post more interactive and more social network friendly, the news site yesterday introduced "HuffPo Badges" to encourage interaction among readers, mediabistro.com reported today.

So what do the badges do?

Mediabistro's Alex Alvarez explains: "Basically, they function like a cross between Gawker's tiered, 'starred commenter' system and Foursquare badges. HuffPost badges are awarded based on user activity and interactivity, so, for example, those who regularly comment on the site or share stories across social networks like Twitter can receive a 'Superuser' badge. Readers who go through flagging inappropriate comments to feel some modicum of power as they sit in their sad little cubicles all day can earn 'Moderator' badges."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-30 12:39

Times Online and Sun Online have stopped disclosing their traffic information mere months before Murdoch initiates his paywall. In unrelated news, Variety saw pageviews drop 40 percent since it's initiated its paywall. [paidContent, MediaPost]

General Secretary of the UK National Union of Journalists Jeremy Dear says that to save journalism, it's not the funding that matters, its the political will. [Journalism.co.uk]

To raise awareness--and to strengthen that political will--the National Union of Journalists is reinstating its regional press awards. [Guardian]

Here are some handy online tools to add data-based visuals to your news website. [Online Journalism Blog]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-29 19:31

Content producers like Associated Content and Demand Media have sometimes been likened to a Ford factory line--mindless and uncreative, yes, but efficient and cheap. And at a time when news outlets are looking for places to cut corners, using content from these companies seems particularly enticing. Earning journalists sometimes as little as $5, articles produced by these companies are cheap and simple enough for struggling papers to fill holes in coverage and diversify their offerings.

"This was not a business decision, but entirely an editorial one," Keith McAllister, global online editor for Thomson Reuters, told AdAge concerning Reuter's use of Associated stories. Reuters has used stories on the economy, and McAllister sees the use of these stories not as a replacement for original reporting but as an add-on to Reuter's current offerings.

"We want to fill out the online offering as much as possible," he said. "We're building Thomson Reuters to be a content candy store."
Although articles used by Reuters on the economy were published with a label stating "This is part of a series of personal accounts about small business and the recession," some are worried that the pieces may be taken as professional journalism.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-29 18:41

Newspaper turf wars seem to be popping up all over the U.S. lately, and the spirit of competition has most recently struck Washington, D.C.'s nationally respected Washington Post. Once known as the national newspaper for political news, the Washington Post has begun to lose ground to newer competitors since the proliferation of political blogs and websites made possible by the internet. In a move that some say directly challenges political coverage competitor Politico, the Washington Post launched its new PostPolitics homepage today.

According to Washington Post national editor Kevin Merrida, PostPolitics.com aims "to collect and organize our great political reporting and analysis on one dynamic destination." The motivation behind the politically-branded site, however, is competition. Paul Volpe, national innovation editor of the Post, told Neiman Lab that the Washington Post needed to redefine itself as a go-to spot for politics.
"The challenge that we face was we were fighting for space on our own front page," he said. "We have competitors that can devote their entire homepage to politics."

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-29 17:01

The Social Media Club France recently blogged about how the diversification of mobile devices which give readers access to the internet has obviously changed the way users access information. As a result, Social Media Club France recommends that journalists adopt a method of presenting news that is not only interactive but also adaptable to the non-linear diffusion of media.

Prior to the proliferation of smart phones and tablet PCs news was released in a fairly straightforward manner starting either with print or online and slowly working it's way outward. As previously mentioned, though this has changed journalists have not effectively adapted their methods of distribution to capitalize on the way users are consuming data.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-29 13:24

If you're interested in learning how some organizations are implementing user-generated content in the newsroom, The Poynter Institute is offering Editors Weblog readers $10 off its upcoming online broadcast, Stretching Your News Budget with User Content. This half-day online broadcast takes place on Thursday, May 6 from 1:15-5:30 p.m. Eastern U.S. time, and it is part of a two-day conference at The Poynter Institute, Stretching Your News Budget with User Content: A Poynter Conference.

During the broadcast, participants will be able to watch the event live online and chat with other online participants as our panel of experts explores the benefits and drawbacks of enlisting citizen contributors to news reporting. Hosts for the afternoon sessions include Amanda Michel, director of distributed reporting at ProPublica; Poynter faculty members Rick Edmonds and Kelly McBride; Jan Schaffer of J-Lab and Susan Karol from the Suburban Newspapers of America Foundation.

For more information and to register for the conference broadcast, visit Stretching Your News Budget with User Content. Your $10 discount code for the event is: PWEFPRO10

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-29 12:24

French daily le Parisien has just introduced a citizen reporting function to its iPhone app. Called YOU, and launched with the help of French start-up Citizenside, the citizen reporting community is already in place on the paper's website.

YOU allows readers to send in their photos, videos or textual contributions and these are immediately published on the YOU section of the site. Contributions are then verified by Le Parisien staff and may be used in on leParisien.fr and in the print publications le Parisien and its national edition Aujourd'hui.

Allowing readers to send in information and images directly via their mobile phones makes sense as it provides immediacy and it is possible to use geolocation to corroborate where news was sent from. Several other publications already invite their readers to send contributions via their iPhones, including the Telegraph, CNN, and Bild.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-29 12:05

The Tribune Company-owned Los Angeles Times will soon begin adding e-commerce links to selected stories and blog posts, as "both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company," editor Russ Stanton told staffers in a memo yesterday, LAObserved reported.

The e-commerce links will be highlighted in green with a double underline and no blue editorial link will be replaced with an e-commerce link. Each article or a post that includes an e-commerce green link will have a disclaimer at its foot stating: "Clicking on Green Links will take you to a third-party e-commerce site. These sites are not operated by the Los Angeles Times. The Times Editorial staff is not involved in any way with Green Links or with these third-party sites," Stanton stated in the memo, posted on LAObserved. "These post-publication links to sites such as Amazon and TicketNetwork will serve as both a reader service and a revenue opportunity for the company."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-29 11:17

"World's worst" tennis player sues for libel but still lives up to his name. [Telegraph]

Chrome browser add-ons offer users an easier news-reading experience. [Journalism.co.uk]

Although paper circulation is down for most US newspapers, circulation counts for electronic editions are up 40 percent and Canadian papers are doing just fine. [paidContent, Guardian]

Report suggests nonprofit news organizations need to offer more transparent financial information. [Wisconsin Watch]

Corriere della Serra to join three other European papers in providing English-language content online. [Guardian]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-28 18:24

A year after Reuters began investigative reporting the news agency announced its plans to increase its reporting efforts as a result of consumer demands. Jon Pompeo from the Business Insider's The Wire, recently discussed Reuters investigative reporting efforts with Jim Impoco, the agency's investigative reporting editor.

According to the agency's online news editor, Keith McCallister, reader's have been "eating [investigative journalism stories] up." McCallister stated that the investigative stories are read more frequently than any of the agency's other articles by a factor of 10.

Several factors might explain Reuters success at investigative reporting when so many other news agencies have cut back on the service. Impoco believes that part of its success is a result of having "lots of boots on the ground." Pompeo notes that the international news agency employs 2800 reporters in more that 200 bureaus worldwide.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-28 17:39

Popular tech blog Gizmodo's leak of the new iPhone prototype has garnered the attention of more than just interested Apple fanatics. Last Friday, Gizmodo editor Jason Chen arrived home around 9:45 to find police in his home, removing 4 computers and 2 servers with a search warrant signed by the judge of the Superior Court of San Mateo as their defense. In response, Gawker Chief Operating Officer and legal counsel Gaby Derbyshire claims this search was illegal under a California shield law created especially to protect journalists, and that the police must return Chen's belongings.

What has since erupted across the web and likely in legal courts soon is a debate over the legality of Gizmodo's iPhone scoop, the application of the untested shield law, and, most fundamentally, whether bloggers are considered journalists in the eyes of the law.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-28 16:17

South Africa's Cape Times plans to redesign and relaunch just before the World Cup takes place in June, GrubStreet.co.za reported.

"We're hoping to achieve a livelier product, taking into account media trends around the world and more partnership with online," Chris Whitfield, editor-in-chief of the Cape Times, told GrubStreet.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com.

Also, UK tabloid The Sun plans to release a special 3D edition on June 5 in advance of the World Cup.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-28 11:56

In the media battle raging between The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal for New York City, the WSJ has the technological advantage. Writing for TechCrunch Erick Schonfeld reports that the Wall Street Journal is using the geo-based social networking service Foursquare to maximize their market penetration.

Schonfeld reports that the WSJ has created three different types of badges for the various demographics the Journal hopes to attract. The three badges include a Banker Badge, a Urban Adventurer Badge, and a Lunch Box badge which will be awarded to readers who access the WSJ for information corresponding to the financial world, neighbourhood reviews, and dinning recommendations.

While Schonfeld doubts that the WSJ's presence on Foursquare will "convince New Yorkers to turn to the Wall Street Journal for local reporting," the badges represents the increasing number of partnerships occurring between publications and the social networking service.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-27 13:50

With the advent of online news media and the recent crisis in publishing, newspapers are struggling to find their purpose in an ever-shifting news landscape.

The internet has opened the door to anyone and everyone with an opinion on the news, and this move has left newspapers wondering how they should adjust their offerings, if at all. Some offer journalists the opportunity to provide more commentary on their beats, blurring the line between unbiased reporting and opinionated commentary. Others, like the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, feel that it's important to balance all opinions with an opposing opinion.

"If we have a view to the right, (our readers) want a balance of a view to the left," said Journal-Constitution editor Julia Wallace to NPR. "And they want us to be transparent about how we go about our work."

Wallace's comments led Slate's food writer Dan Mitchell to question if its really in the best interest of consumers for newspapers to offer them issues that are "dull, useless, and full of mush."

"It's like our newspapers are being run by drugged out, brainwashed cult members," he writes. "They really believe that the less newspapers appear to have been written and edited by humans, the better."

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-27 13:36

A Boston area publication, The Telegram & Gazette, recently announced that it would begin implementing a "metered model" paywall over the summer. Jacqueline Reis from the Telegram and Gazette staff announced on their website that the new model would not charge print subscribers for access to online content.

The new model will still give readers free access to the majority of content offered on the website, with the exception of the content produced by the Telegram and Gazette staff. The newspaper's publisher, Bruce Gaultney described the new method as a way to "recognize the value of local news" that would "bring new revenue to support news operations."

Between 2002 and 2006 the TandG's online content was completely blocked by a paywall. The paywall was removed when it fielded to attract a large readership, leading to an immediate "rise in Web traffic."

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-27 12:31

WAN-IFRA and NEWSPLEX would like to invite you to join a select group of publishers, CEO's and senior news executives on a study tour to leading multimedia newsrooms in Europe. The tour, from 16 to 21 May, will comprise of visits to publishing companies at the forefront of multimedia.

In the UK we will visit Archant Ltd. and its regional titles Eastern Daily Press & Evening News in Norwich. The formerly separate newsrooms have been integrated in a completely new way to deliver editorial content for a quality title and a tabloid title as well as series of weekly titles and sites with different target groups. A workshop on newsroom reorganisation, led by our Newsplex team, will be also part of this visit in Norwich.

The Bild Zeitung in Berlin is one of the most successful newspapers in Europe concerning reach of print and digital and has a long tradition of embracing digital in a very dynamic tabloid style publication. User generated content, "user-generated promotion" and the use of branding on various non-publishing products ("Volksprodukte") are quite unique concepts in most parts of Europe.

The Blick in Zurich has just launched its new title-integrated newsroom, where three print titles and the digital platforms work in a newly built newsroom environment, which uses a central decision place and a specifically designed media-wall to plan and produce the content for all titles.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-27 11:09

Facebook's new Graph API, released last Friday, allows users to see public events people have said they will attend or have attended - even if that person is not a "friend" of the user viewing the information, MediaGuardian reported today. The new API was just one new feature unveiled last week during F8, Facebook's developers conference.

According to Facebook, however, the API simply "attempts to simplify the way developers read and write data to Facebook. It presents a simple, consistent view of the Facebook social graph, uniformly representing objects in the graph (e.g., people, photos, events, and fan pages) and the connections between them (e.g., friend relationships, shared content, and photo tags)... All of the objects in the Facebook social graph are connected to each other via relationships. Bret Taylor is a fan of the Coca-Cola page, and Bret Taylor and Arjun Banker are friends. We call those relationships connections in our API."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-27 11:02

Hyperlocal blog network ChicagoNow is finding success, offering other such models hope that they can be part of the future of journalism.

The website offers readers 350 blogs written by community journalists based in Chicago, with each covering niche topics from across the city. The bloggers are paid $5 for every 1000 local page views, and though the site employs editors, the content is entirely produced by the network of blogs.

Editors of the site help blogs take advantage of hyperlinking and SEO tools, and ChicagoNow has started to offer its bloggers educational seminars to help them create better content. The bloggers cover topics from crime to public schools to local politics, and they all offer a bio and a picture, giving the blogs a personal quality that many larger newspapers lack.

Rather than purchase an already established hyperlocal news site, the Chicago Tribune Co. created ChicagoNow from the ground-up, and it recently received 1.5 million unique visitors and 15.5 million page views in March alone. Although other hyperlocal news ventures are entering the city--the Chicago Cooperative provides content to the New York Times, and Patch.com will be coming soon--ChicagoNow seems to be here to stay.

Source: TechCrunch

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-26 19:18

Today, the Wall Street Journal launches its metro section, raising the stakes of its squabble with the New York Times. Your roundup on the issue includes an account from Press Gazette, Editor & Publisher's article concerning the NYT's local expansions, a memo from NYT execs Arthur Sulzberger and Janet Robinson to their staff, and our post questioning the motives behind the Journal's move, where you can find additional links. [Press Gazette, Editor & Publisher, Poynter]

The debate on anonymous comments continues in the Guardian. [Guardian]

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-26 19:07

The UK's Bureau of Investigative Journalism hopes to fill in the holes left by the recent media crisis and subsequent corner-cutting that has taken place over the past three years, reports Journalism.co.uk.

The Potter Foundation-backed venture employs 17 freelancers and full-time staff members and boasts a budget of £2 million to support multimedia investigative ventures. Managing editor Iain Overton claims the bureau has a collaboration agreement with the Financial Times, a commission from Channel 4 News, and interest from at least three other news venues, including television and radio.

One of the main goals of the bureau, said Overton, is to provide freelancers with fiscal support to pursue investigations that mainstream media organizations may have an interest in but are unable to support.
"There are new opportunities in terms of creating ways in which journalists collaborate and bringing print journalists and broadcast journalists to create a multimedia offering," he told Journalism.co.uk. "The challenge is persuading the editors that they can allow this to happen."

Not only will the bureau create connections between journalists from different media, but it also aims to improve the technology available to journalists to help them engage in investigative reporting.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-04-26 18:34

Readers familiar with the British daily The Independent will notice something lacking from its pages after its most recent re-launch. According to Press Gazette's The Wire, The Independent no longer has its Monday Media Section. Instead, The Independent's media coverage is now scattered throughout the publication's new "viewspaper" section.

Eliminating the media section may come as a surprise to some. The recent buzz surrounding the launch of the iPad as well as the past year's media crisis would suggest that a media section is both important and relevant as media and technology become increasingly intertwined. However, The Guardian with their Media Guardian section now stands the only publication that devotes an entire section to developments in the media.

The Independent's re-launch has received mixed but mostly positive reviews. The most notable change to the paper is the inclusion of a 20 page "viewspaper" which is a new section that replaces traditional news with analysis and commentary. Peter preston from The Guardian's media blog described the paper as "stylish, cool and coherent," while others remain unconvinced or unhappy with the new changes.

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-26 17:53


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