WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 30.07.2014


January 2010

New Associated Press content has not been hosted on Google News since the 24th of December, paidContent reported. This has been confirmed by Google in the following a statement:

"We have a licensing agreement with the Associated Press that permits us to host its content on Google properties such as Google News. Some of that content is still available today. At the moment we're not adding new hosted content from the AP."

Google News has hosted the Associated Press' content since August 2007. The deal between the two was vague and did not specify the way in which each article was permitted to be used, only that each article only had a shelf life of 30 days on the site. This, and the fact that the contract will expire at the end of this month, has led to the news agency seeking to redefine its contract with the aggregator.

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-11 16:17

In many streets corners of Tirana, newspaper stands are illustrations of how the time of Albania's monolithic communist press has become history, also contradicting the gloomy future often predicted for the industry worldwide. In the capital's hip Blokku district, for instance, the kiosks show glossy magazines with their assortments of automobile, women, computer, and leisure titles. They are less numerous than in developed democracies, but leave a feeling of a vibrant industry.

Similar publications, some of which are familiar to western European and American readers, can be spotted in other limited places like the commercial streets of Durres, the second city and main port. Some Albanian names convey a local exotic touch (Klan, Spekter, Psikologji), unlike other magazines spotted even in areas not so much visited by foreigners (the original English-language, Italian, French, and even Spanish versions of Gente, Femme actuelle, Cosmopolitan).

More intriguing are the political dailies often displayed horizontally on tables - or vertically, hanging like cloths from a string - in front of the newsstands. They are plentiful, easily numbering more than a dozen, which is considerable for a country with only 3.6 million inhabitants. Their cover pages are also widely visible on Albanian television channels,which fill their news program every morning with endless press reviews quoting the main headlines.

Author

Jean-Pierre Tailleur

Date

2010-01-11 14:26

More local news comes from newspapers and their websites than from television, radio or online-only news sources, ABC News reports.

A study by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism looked at one week of local news reporting across 53 media outlets in Baltimore during July last year. It found that for six major stories, 61% of original reporting or new information came from newspapers and their websites. By contrast, 28% came from local television stations and their websites, 7% for radio stations and 4% for online-only publications.

Although local television produced slightly more content than newspapers, fewer of the stations' stories contained original reporting. Content often included information obtained from other media, primarily newspapers.

"This study does suggest that if newspapers were to disappear, what would be left to aggregate?" director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism Tom Rosenstiel said.

It's not all rosy for newspapers, though. Falling advertising revenue and staff cuts over the last decade have meant that local newspapers aren't covering stories in as much depth or producing as much content as they did in the days before online news, according to the study.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-11 13:46

Last week, the Zelnik report, commissioned by French culture minister Frédéric Mitterand, recommended imposing a 'Google tax' on the online advertising revenues of Google and other Internet giants as part of an initiative to support creative output in France. Patrick Zelnik, CEO of independent music label Naïve, Jacques Toubon, former minister of culture and Guillaume Cerutti, CEO of Sotheby's France put the report together, also recommending ways to try to get young people back into buying rather than illegally downloading music online.

Zelnik told Libération that he envisaged taxing a "a small percentage of the €800 million that the search engine brings in from advertising in France." He told the French daily that although the music industry was in the most difficult situation, the press was also "in grave danger."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-11 13:09

Towards the end of last year, Rupert Murdoch, head of News International, spoke out against news aggregators. In an interview with Sky News Australia, he condemned the likes of Google as nothing more than "thieves", intent on stealing content from his newspaper's websites for their own benefit. The media mogul has long wielded threats of removing all News International articles from search indexes and implementing stringent paywalls around all his websites by the end of 2010.

It's only January, but Murdoch has already set about putting his plans into action: On Friday, the Guardian reported that News International is to prevent the aggregator NewsNow.co.uk from linking to content found on the Times Online website, by changing its search engine settings via the robots.txt protocol.

NewsNow claims to be the UK's largest news aggregator, reportedly welcoming two million visitors a month. Of the move, NewsNow's managing director and chairman, Struan Bartlett, commented:

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-11 13:02

If the sale of The Independent to Russian businessman Alexander Lebedev goes ahead, outspoken columnist Rod Liddle is in line to become the next editor, The Guardian reports. The news has attracted widespread criticism from Independent journalists and readers, Roy Greenslade writes.

Liddle was previously the editor of BBC Radio 4's Today program, but resigned in 2002 to continue writing a column for The Guardian that was in conflict with the BBC's impartiality rules. He later became a columnist for The Sunday Times and The Spectator. His work has been subject to criticisms of racism and misogyny.

A Facebook group established in protest, titled 'If Rod Liddle becomes editor of The Independent, I will not buy it again', had 1582 members by 11am.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-11 12:09

It's been a week of managerial announcements, with the Associated Press announcing the new managers of its Social Network Center and its News Center. The latest announcement is from the Star Tribune in Minneapolis-St. Paul, which has named Michael Klingensmith as its new publisher.

As a former Time Inc. executive, Klingensmith has worked as general manager of Time magazine, president of Sports Illustrated and founding publisher of Entertainment Weekly. Most recently he was a managing director of AdMedia Partners.

He replaces Chris Harte, who stepped down when the Star Tribune was in bankruptcy protection last year.

Klingensmith said he expected his new position to be difficult but fascinating.

"I really think there's nothing more important in the business right now than reformulating the business model for some of these media properties that are really critically important to communities - and to this community, one that I care about deeply," he told the Star Tribune. "Democracy depends on people having good information and I think this is really an important job."

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-08 18:21

About a month ago, Jay Rosen, a journalism professor at New York University, published a post on his blog about an idea that could make journalism better by allowing more people to participate in the journalistic process: ExplainThis.

Aware of the importance of context and research in the news environment, Rosen explained to the Poynter Online that his idea was based on a user-centric approach to news.

As conceived by Rosen, ExplainThis would have two parts. One would be an open system through which users can ask and answer questions and vote on them. The second part would involve "journalists standing by."

According to Rosen, journalists would monitor questions, ultimately answering those that meet three conditions:

1) many people are asking the same thing
2) the question can't be answered well via an ordinary or a sophisticated search
3) answering the question would require the work of journalism, in other words, serious investigative and explanatory work.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-08 17:58

Two newspaper printing plants, one each in the US and the UK, are set to close, and substantial layoffs are expected to follow.

In the UK, Harmsworth Printing has begun a 30-day consultation over closing its Plymouth printing plant. If the plant is closed, 90 staff could be lost, although the company has said it would try to find jobs for them elsewhere in the organisation.

The closure will not be seen as a surprise. Harmsworth closed three of its printing plants last year. And if this closure goes ahead, a number of papers, including the Exeter Express & Echo, will be printed at other plants. Most are expected to move to the Didcot plant.

Meanwhile, in the US, the Los Angeles Times has announced that it will close its Orange County printing facility from next month in order to cut costs. Eighty jobs will be lost in the process.

Closing the plant will mean that editorial deadlines will fall at an earlier time. To make up for this, The Times will publish a new section, LATExtra, with late-breaking news. It will close the standalone Monday business section, though, in another effort to cut expenditure.

This news comes as The Times prepares to launch a new local news website for Orange County. Let's hope it doesn't suffer a similar fate.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-08 17:06

Everyblock is betting on hyperlocal once again.

Just this week, Everyblock announced the release of Notify Your Neighbors, a new service that will allow people to share updates of what is happening in their neighborhoods and on their blocks, as a press release from the company explained.

The newest addition to Everyblock's services will be available on everyblock.com and as an application for the iPhone and iPod touch, too. The free application will allow consumers to send and receive updates from any location.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-08 14:25

Newspaper readers in France have been disrupted this week, after distribution company Presstalis blocked the distribution of papers to different parts of the country two days in a row. In response to the action, one newspaper has refused to publish an edition today.

It was northern France and part of central France that went without their national daily newspapers on Wednesday. Papers were distributed normally in the east, west and south. Le Monde made a PDF version of that day's paper available for free on its website.

On Thursday, distribution was interrupted in the east and south of the country. By contrast, the north of France, including Paris, received its newspapers mostly as normal. Only Le Figaro and France Soir suffered a smaller distribution than normal in this area.

In response, France Soir decided not to publish a Friday edition. The paper's director of communications Cyrille Benoist said that the decision was both symbolic and collective. "It's a painful decision," he said, "that we wished to make, to respond to the absurd with the absurd."

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-08 14:10

December saw the launch of a new German news magazine, as Zuerst or "First" hit newsagents' shelves across the country, as well as those in Austria, Luxembourg and South Tyrol, with an initial print run of 90,000. Like other monthly publications of its type, Zuerst's 84 pages are filled with articles concerning the economy, current affairs, travel and culture. Flick through the magazine and you would be forgiven for aligning the publication with established news magazines Spiegel or Stern - the very ilk of which it is infact competing against. Take a closer look and it becomes clear that the publication is offering an altogether different message.

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-08 13:53

More than 1,300 publishers have now partnered with Journalism Online, and the paid content network will begin testing in coming weeks, Steve Brill, the group's founder, told minonline today.

However, the group has changed its tune a bit since it began, with Brill telling minonline that "We are refusing to launch pay walls where you say to first-time visitors 'pay or go away,'" and will instead give visitors access to 10 to 15 articles for free before asking for payment. Journalism Online, launched in April 2009 by Brill, Gordon Crovitz and Leo Hindrey, hopes regular visitors will pay for complete access, while one-time or infrequent visitors won't be barred.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-08 13:49

Plastic Logic launched its long-awaited e-reader yesterday at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. QUE, described in a press release as "the world's first proReader" is a large screen product aimed at business people. For now, it is only available in the US, shipping in April, and there were no details about dates for launches in other countries.

The e-reader measures 8.5 by 11 inches and has a touch-screen 10.7 inch display. It is plastic, and therefore lighter and possibly more durable than a glass screen. Two models are available: 4GB and 8GB. Digital books are being supplied by Barnes and Noble, but selling books is not its primary goal.

It is very much being marketed at business people rather than leisure readers. The press release quotes Plastic Logic CEO Richard Archuleta who said that "mobile professionals can look forward to a paperless briefcase, a lighter load and a better way to work." It supports reading and annotating documents, and also features a calendar that can import appointments from its owner's computer. It can even display emails, and Plastic Logic will have an app for BlackBerry phones so that users can wirelessly sync content from their phones, according to Wired.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-08 12:55

A new local news website, the Orange County Local News Network, will be launched next month, paidContent reports. The U.S. Local News Network and the Los Angeles Times Media Group will join forces to launch the website, and will cross-sell advertising and share content.

The LA Times Media Group already owns several local weekly newspapers in Orange County, including the Huntington Beach Independent and the Coastline Pilot. The new website will compete with another regional newspaper, the Orange County Register.

The Orange County Local News Network will be staffed by four full-time reporters, working out of the Times' office, and 15 freelancers.

Although the financial details of the agreement have not been disclosed, it is understood that the Times will not own a stake in the website, and will instead generate revenue from its advertising.

The U.S. Local News Network already has two local sites, the San Diego News Network and the Southwest Riverside Network, with plans to establish another 40 in cities across the US in the next two years.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-08 11:57

A Washington Post application for Apple's iPhone is "in the works and may be ready in the coming weeks", revealed the Post's media critic, Howard Kurtz, in an online discussion.

The Washington Post will join other major newspapers, albeit belatedly, in the iPhone application scene, like The New York Times and the Financial Times which released their Apps. in 2008 and 2009 respectively. Last month, the British daily, the Guardian, launched a paid-for iPhone application featuring its news content and a great design aesthetic.

In July 2008, the Washington Post launched a City Guide application for the iPhone and iPod touch providing an on-the-go personal entertainment guide for over 2,000 Washington, D.C.-area restaurants, bars, and clubs. However, the Washington Post's news content was only available through a web application on the iPhone.

Although no further details have been made available regarding the Post's new iPhone application, it is quite likely that it will carry the Post's news content, allowing users to synch directly to the latest news from their mobile devices.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-07 19:31

The Kitanippon Shimbun has closed its evening edition and will now publish a morning edition only, NSK News Bulletin reports.

Plans are in place to redesign its morning edition, including moving some content from the defunct evening edition to the morning one. The website will also get a makeover, adding more content and featuring the latest news ahead of the print edition.

The company's announcement of the closure focused on recent changes in the media environment and the rise of the internet as a source of news. "In particular, the business environment surrounding the publication of our evening edition is becoming increasingly harsh, and we have concluded that we can no longer best meet the diverse needs of our readers through the continued publication of an evening edition," the announcement said.

This closure does not appear to be a surprise. September figures from the Audit Bureau of Circulation showed that the morning edition had a circulation of 248,636 copies, while the evening edition distributed only 31,939. Three other Japanese dailies closed their evening editions last year to go morning-only. And closures and cutbacks are not infrequent for English-language newspapers.

The per-copy price for the print edition of the Toyama Prefecture-based paper will stay the same, as will the monthly subscription price, set at 2,987 yen (US $32).

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-07 19:00

Trinity Mirror has clearly decided that the new year is the right time for a shake- up, making significant changes to its west London titles: As of the 15th of January, weekly Fulham and Hammersmith Chronicle will no longer carry its 60p price tag and The London Informer is set to shut up shop altogether. As a result, circulation of the Fulham and Hammersmith Chronicle, which currently stands at 1,257, will increase to a considerable 72,000.

Trinity Mirror employees can breathe a sigh or relief, as the publisher has underlined that the restructuring of its operations will not result in job cuts.

Other changes include the renaming of the Kensington & Chelsea News to the Kensington & Chelsea Chronicle - which incidentally will also become a freesheet, as well as the renaming of the Paddington, Marylebone & Pimlico Mercury to the Westmister Chronicle. The latter will be distributed free, though paid-for copies will be available in newsagents.

Media commentator for the Guardian, Roy Greenslade, has called the move "inevitable", owing the fact that "none of the titles have much of a paid-for sale. And the Fulham paper has been under threat from the council-run h&f news, which is published fortnightly."

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-07 18:44

Independent Newspapers South Africa has launched an 'E-dition', an online version of its printed newspapers that keeps the same format and layout as the print edition. This is in addition to the papers' standard news websites.

It also includes interactive radio and instant translation functions, so readers can listen to the articles in 11 languages. The editions can be downloaded for offline reading and are optimised for reading on smart phones. Bookmarking and search functions are also included.

The E-ditions will be available by subscription. A free seven-day trial is offered, and rates thereafter vary between newspapers. For The Star, for example, they range from 100 rand (US $13.50) for one month, up to 1137.50 rand (US $153.67) for twelve months, the same price as a yearly print subscription. For The Argus, meanwhile, one month costs R 88.40 (US $11.95) and one year costs R 1060.80 (US $143.30), which is also the same price as a yearly subscription to the print version.

Author

Elizabeth Redman

Date

2010-01-07 17:38

At the beginning of December, the London Evening Standard made a number of significant job cuts. Sub-editors were the worst hit. The move came as little surprise owing to the fact that the role of sub-editors has been long debated, particularly in our current harsh financial climate. Indeed, media commentator Roy Greenslade deemed them "a layer in the publishing industry, which can be "eliminated".

However, latest reports by the Guardian tell of London's number one freesheet looking to outsource a considerable amount of subediting to the Press Association, at its editorial pages service in Howden, East Yorkshire. This would include the subediting of entertainment and recruitment sections.

Outsourcing subediting is not uncommon practice, with The Glasgow Herald and the Evening Times just some of the Press Association's high profile clients.

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-07 16:54

The buzz keeps growing and growing around tablets - electronic devices with a touch-screen interface, e-reader capabilities, as well as web browsing among others.

Rumors about Apple's tablet, or the iSlate, as it is now being called, have been gaining momentum as the elusive and innovative device that is supposed to look like a bigger version of Apple's iPhone, prepares to launch early this year.

Several other big high-tech players have also lined up to present their own versions of the slate. Just this last Wednesday, Microsoft unveiled the Hewlett-Packard yet to be named tablet at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

Microsoft's CEO, Steve Ballmer, highlighted an upcoming slate computer from H.P. set to ship this year in an on-stage demo. As The New York Times reports, the device appeared to have a 10-inch and 12-inch screen and had a copy of "Twilight" loaded up on the display to show off its e-reading function. The H.P. device was running Amazon.com's Kindle software for P.C.s but outdid the Kindle by providing a full-color display. Microsoft and H.P.'s slate had a touch-screen and full multimedia support.

Tablets vs. E-Readers

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-01-07 16:43

The Washington Post is to be the guest newspaper at the 17th World Editors Forum, to be held in Beirut, Lebanon in June 2010. Both editor-in-chief Marcus Brauchli and a managing editor Raju Narisetti have confirmed their attendance.

Brauchli was appointed executive editor in 2008, months after leaving the post of managing editor at the Wall Street Journal. He spent most of his career working at Dow Jones, and as a foreign correspondent, reported from 20 countries over 15 years.

Narisetti, now responsible for washingtonpost.com's day-to-day operations and involved in guiding technology and interactivity strategies, also joined WaPo in 2008. Previously he was editor of Indian business newspaper and website Mint, and before that was a deputy managing editor at the Wall Street Journal.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-07 15:57

One of the reasons readers are trading online for print that is rarely discussed is that newspaper stories are too long, while online articles are more to-the-point, Michael Kinsley argues in the Atlantic this week.

His reasoning? "Context," which newspapers pride themselves on providing, has become "an invitation to hype," causing readers to go elsewhere to just get the facts. Shorter, more concise articles could cause a boost in print sales, but existing mandatory newsroom rules to give more context may be hurting print, he writes in his column.

For more on this story, please see our sister publication, www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-01-07 15:36

The German publisher, M.DuMont Schauberg, which owns the daily newspaper Berliner Kurier, has announced its intentions to launch a news supplement aimed directly at a younger audience later this year. The exact date of publication is not yet known.

The move comes after news magazine Spiegel successfully launched Dein Spiegel last year, a separate publication from its news magazine and aimed at young readers between the ages of nine and twelve. Since its debut in September, with the first edition focusing on the then hot topic of Germany's general election, the publication has enjoyed considerable success and now lines the shelves of newsstands across the country.

Likewise, weekly newspaper die Zeit also launched a similar initiative with "KinderZeit", providing news and entertainment to its target audience of eight to twelve year olds.

Now it's Kiku's turn. Berliner Kurier's newest venture is expected to take the form of a Sunday supplement sold as part of the weekend publication. The launch has been labelled an effort to safeguard the survival of print by introducing a younger audience to the medium at a time when digital news seems the likely way forward.

Incidentally, all three newspapers have well developed digital new sites, so not only are young readers being recruited to the concept of print, but perhaps more importantly for the publishers, a brand also.

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-01-07 14:33


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