WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


March 2007

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The American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) convention in Washington DC, held from Tuesday to today, brought together editors of new and old media to discuss the hybrid future of newspapers.

One panel combined old and new media professionals, including Arianna Huffington, co-founder and editor in chief of HuffingtonPost.com and Donald E. Graham, chief executive officer and chairman of The Washington Post Co. Though panelists came from “different worlds” of news, all agreed that newspaper editors need to improve access and contribution to online content.

“I believe in a hybrid future for newspapers,” said Huffington. “My passion is about … bringing together the best of the old with the best of the new.”

Huffington also believes that the best of the new can keep tabs on the old, as when bloggers pick up underreported stories that newspapers drop.

Barry Diller
, chairman and chief executive of InterActiveCorp., stressed the importance of newspapers’ creating online content. "You can’t simply slap a print thing onto an online site and think there’s anything compelling happening," he said.

Panelists concurred that newspapers that use flash graphics, video, animation, and other online elements have the right idea of how to hold onto readers.

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Author

Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-30 18:02

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Starting May 4, the Guardian Weekly will follow the Guardian’s lead and shrink from tabloid to half-Berliner format.

The masthead, headlines, and text, will follow the Guardian as well in changing to a light typeface. To compensate for the smaller format, the Weekly will average 48 pages rather than the current 32-36. The Berliner format retains broadsheet proportions but allows easier handling and reading. Content will remain the same except for a minor shuffling of puzzles and games.

The Guardian switched to a full Berliner format in 2005 and has seen increased circulation since.

Source: Guardian Unlimited

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-30 16:05

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St Bride’s Church, in the heart of London’s Fleet Street, has been the spiritual home of the press for the last 500 years. To celebrate the 50th anniversary since its rededication (following its restoration after World War 2), St Bride’s is holding a series of special events about the press, including a special Harvest Festival Service, on Oct. 14. The Church is asking editors from around the world to send in their newspaper to be displayed on this occasion.

St Bride’s has been known as the press’ church since the 16th century, when the Fleet Street area abounded with print presses and later newspaper-making facilities. The Church was almost entirely destroyed on Dec. 29 1940, before it was restored and rededicated on Dec. 19 1957.

The Harvest special will be focused on the harvest of the printed word and will constitute, according to the St Bride’s website, “a World Record attempt for the number of newspapers displayed in one place at one time.” St Bride’s is inviting editors and journalists worldwide to send in a copy of their paper.

Please send newspapers and other contributions to:

Press Office
St Bride’s Church
Fleet Street
London
EC4Y 8AU
Telephone: 020 7427 0133
Email: info@stbrides.com

Source: Canon David Meara - St Bride’s Fleet Street

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Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2007-03-30 15:36

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Last night, two Los Angeles billionaires put in a last-minute bid for the Tribune Company, outbidding real-estate tycoon Sam Zell and most likely pushing back even further a decision on the company’s fate.

Ronald W. Burkle and Eli Broad offered a deal based on employee stock ownership, as did Zell, but offered a dollar more a share and $500 million of their own money compared to Zell’s $300 million. Before this new offer, Tribune Co. planned to decide by Saturday and seemed close to selling to Zell.

The employee stock ownership model, used in both offers to make employees the majority owners, has worked for small companies but has rarely been used for larger ones in the last 20 years.

While Zell has said he would keep the company intact, Burkle and Broad have both separately expressed interest in acquiring only the Los Angeles Times, though their joint plans are not yet known.

Source: The New York Times

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-30 14:35

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The Australian government announced yesterday that they will relax ownership laws April 4, months earlier than expected.

The new laws will abolish 20-year-old rules stopping overseas investors from owning more than 25 percent of a city newspaper publisher and 15 percent of a TV network. One company will also be able to own two forms of media - newspapers, television and radio - in a market, rather than just one.

These changes should push forward takeovers and mergers and have already caused a huge surge in Australian media investment.

Source: Bloomberg.com

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-30 12:37

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A Poynter Institute study released yesterday at the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) conference in Washington found that perhaps American newsreaders’ attention spans aren’t so short; online readers read an average of 77% of a story, compared to 62% in broadsheets and 57% in tabloids.

The Eyetrack survey studied 600 newspaper readers from six different newspapers using electronic eyetracking equipment on readers while they read broadsheets, tabloids, and online editions of newspapers. Here’s what else they found:

-Two-thirds of online readers, once they chose a particular story to read, read all of the content.

-As for the notion of an audience who doesn’t read past a story’s jump, tabloid readers read an average of 68% of a story’s jumped content, while broadsheet readers read 59%.

- Readers could be categorized as either methodical (top to bottom; no scanning around, used drop-down menus and navigation bars online) or scanning (scanned headlines and display elements, read part of story then jumped without ever going back, jumped around screen when reading online).

-Seventy-five percent of print readers were methodical readers, who read a higher percentage of text than scanners. Online readers were divided - half scanning, half methodical- but read about the same amount of text.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-30 11:44

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Rafat Ali, founder, publisher, and editor of ContentNext, the parent company of his popular PaidContent.org blog, recently talked to Media Bistro’s Greg Lindsay about making the transition from journalist to entrepreneur.

Ali started Paid Content in 2002, fresh off an early reporting stint at Inside.com, where he says he learned how to report from watching veteran journalists asking tough questions during phone interviews. “I say that there are as many sources within the company as there are employees in the company. Somebody will talk. I'll call everybody I have to, and somebody will talk,” he said. That's what I learned at Inside as a general principle: Do whatever it takes to get the story. That's what they don't teach you at school.”

When he started, Ali was the sole operator of Paid Content, which works to help news executives make money from online content. Now, he has editors, investors, more websites, and veteran management to help him out.

“These days,” he says, “bloggers start with the idea of being a business, but I started [my blog] just to raise my own profile.”

He says the biggest difficulty was his lack of preparation for the financial, day-to-day aspects of running his company.

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-30 10:57

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McClatchy Co., the third largest newspaper publisher in the US, has announced that later this year it will begin providing international news coverage and commentary to Yahoo Inc.

McClatchy reporters will provide news from four international bureaus in Beijing, Cairo, Jerusalem, and Baghdad, in addition to news analysis and commentary in blogs. Many of the stories will also appear in McClatchy newspapers.

McClatchy Co. is not the first news organization to partner with Yahoo and its content will supplement that of the Associated Press, Reuters and Agence France-Press.

“It's a natural marriage,” said Howard Weaver, McClatchy's vice president of news. “We think we will be bringing something to the party that Yahoo doesn't have, and they will bring something to the party that we don't have.”

Source: Finanz Nachrichten through Ifra Executive News Service

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 15:46

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British media group Daily Mail & General Trust has entered into a partnership with the India Today Group to publish English-language newspapers in India.

"It's a growing part of the world and newspapers are struggling in certain parts of the world and in India they are growing,” said Peter Williams, chief financial officer of Daily Mail & General Trust.

India Today is looking to utilize Daily Mail’s knowledge to publish mainline newspapers. The partnership echoes that of the Wall Street Journal and HT Media Ltd. of India in publishing Mint magazine.

Source: Media Guardian and Reuters

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 15:21

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Twitter was created in March 2006 by Evan Williams as a project for Obvious Corporation, San Francisco. Twitter enables any user to publish for free mini-postings or comments from their mobile, instant messenger or online. This new feature could not only change personal communications but could also be used by newspapers online, to increase feedback and interactivity.

Twitter is an interesting social networking website that allows anybody to communicate at all times, by asking the questions “Where are you? What are you doing?” This innovative tool makes it easier to exchange - trivial - ideas, thoughts and feelings.

At this moment, there are about 80,000 Twitter users. It isn´t possible to send messages of more than 140 characters, so users have developed new words. For example: twittering means send a message; twitterrhea means a lot of twittering; twittermaps is a technology to find maps.

The Financial Times analyzes the impact of Twitter and seems still uncertain as to its potential use. “Opinions are divided on whether to love or hate Twitter and whether it is full of useless minutiae or useful information.”

On the other hand, Twitter already counts its share of fanatics.

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Manuel Mantilla

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2007-03-29 13:27

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Outgoing American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) president Dave Zeeck told fellow society members Tuesday that newspapers need to stand up to efforts by bloggers, talk radio pundits, and politicians to devalue the “mainstream media.”

“Bloggers who assail us as the MSM, the mainstream media, as if that is a badge that should shame us… You know what they say; we’re the liberal media. We’re elitists…We’re unpatriotic,” he said, adding that he views the attacks as "bullshit."

Zeeck’s solution? For newspapers to do what they’ve thus far been uncomfortable doing: respond to critics. Newspapers’ best weapon, he says, is great reporting that simply does not exist yet in other news venues. “Who is the Yahoo reporter at my city hall?” he asks. “Where is that Google reporter risking his life in Iraq?”

Zeeck urged editors to push solid investigative reporting and to write a weekly column explaining their newspapers’ decisions to readers.

“I’m not ready to give up on news,” he said. “Let’s use whatever sources we do have.”

Source: Editor & Publisher

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 12:38

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Ariana Huffington of HuffingtonPost.com is planning to recruit large groups of citizen journalists from around the US to cover individual presidential campaigns for the 2008 election.

"Each volunteer reporter/blogger will contribute to a candidate-specific group blog -- offering written updates, campaign tidbits, on-the-scene observations, photos, or original video," she said.

The content produced will be shown on both HuffingtonPost.com as well as Jay Rosen’s NewAssignment.net. Around 40 or 50 people are expected to track individual campaigns with up to 100 covering the frontrunners. In the spirit of pro-am journalism, editors will review work as it comes in to find the most interesting content.

"Our volunteer reporters will aim to provide an authentic counter-narrative to the lockstep consensus we often get from the mainstream media," Huffington said.

Source: Market Watch

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 12:06

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In this era of reader interactivity, user-generated content, self-regulated news and exponential bloggerism, everybody – including newspapers – seems to have fallen for the craze. So what about the negatives of this revolution?

Evidently, the blogosphere and its related activities has not only grown but truly exploded: in December Yahoo launched YouWitnessNews, CNN features ‘I-Report’, the Canadian news site NowPublic claims over 60,000 contributing reporters, and Reddit and Digg have been successful because they allow users to customize and rank their news. Even newspapers, which were once skeptical about the new competition, now embrace and promote citizen contributions within their offerings.

"Citizen journalism is something that is taking off huge at newspapers and all levels of journalism," said Mark Fitzgerald, an editor-at-large for leading news industry publication Editor and Publisher.

Amidst this overwhelming embrace of new media though, its negatives are often ignored. More importantly, they are often ignored by those most concerned – citizens and bloggers.

One of the problems comes from simple ignorance of professional media and news-related practices.

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Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2007-03-29 11:39

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World Editor’s Forum (WEF) President George Brock recently said that thus far, mobile companies have been “extraordinarily inept” at forming partnerships with established media brands, but hopes that the next few years will change this relationship.

Brock’s comments came in response to a question on WEF’s Newsroom Barometer Survey. The question asked what respondents thought, in their community, will be the most common way of reading news in 10 years. Of 435 editors and news executives that answered, only 11 percent believed mobile devices were the future.

Editors’ opinions, Brock said, probably reflect the history of mobile companies’ “failing to create effective partnerships with truly established media and journalism brands.” He looks to the future as an opportunity for change.

"My personal opinion is that there will be quite a lot more journalism on mobile and quite soon,” he said. Though obtaining news on mobile devices often costs money, Brock believes that people are getting used to reading journalistic content on PDAs and mobile phones.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 11:30

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Here’s a new idea from Amy Gahran of Poynter Online: local papers offering “news cards” akin to grocery store discount cards to provide customized content and advertising to readers.

Gahran originally attributed this idea to of a conversation with Vin Crosbie of Digital Deliverance, but Crosbie has denied involvement with its conception, saying the idea was only briefly presented to him by Gahran (see comment below).

Here is Gahran's vision for the future:

-Readers will be able to use their “news cards”, which will come with the paper, at local businesses for special discounts. This process will also help determine which ads come with individual papers. Further, they will be able to swipe the news card at kiosks to print out updated personalized stories and ads on demand.

-Local paper subscribers will receive customized papers, with both stories and advertisements based on their zip codes and interests they have provided to the publisher. The paper will be smaller, but more relevant to individuals.

-Every story will have a web code allowing readers access to related online discussion, ads, and text message updates.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-29 10:54

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The Parisian counsel has recently expressed its desire to establish a ‘code of good conduct’ between mobile freesheet distributors and Parisian news kiosks. The code could eventually prohibit distribution of free papers within a zone surrounding the kiosks.

Many newspapers in Paris are still sold in specialized miniature newsstands.

“Interrogations about the future of kiosks persist as the paid-for press is still struggling,” commented the counsel’s report.

In five years, freebies have revolutionized the press landscape in France. Metro distributes 880,000 copies in 10 cities and 20 Minutes distributes 870,000 copies in eight cities.

Faced with the expansion of the freesheet giants, it seems the Parisian counsel is trying to save – or to prolong – the existence of one of the city’s typical charms.

Source: AFP Mail

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Jean Yves Chainon

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2007-03-29 10:51

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Last night, French newspaper Le Dauphiné Libéré held a presidential debate on foreign policy in the virtual world of Second Life.

Representatives for six presidential candidates, including Segolène Royal and Jean-Marie Le Pen, represented by their onscreen avatars (Internet representations) responded to questions posed by the avatars of two Dauphiné reporters. Transcripts of the debate are available (in French) on the paper’s political website.

“It’s an experience that will let us know the limits of our work,” said Benoît Raphaël, who is in charge of the daily’s Internet content. “We’re testing the three-dimensional Internet that will without a doubt be the Internet of tomorrow.”

Though Dauphiné was the first French newspaper to take part in Second Life, other journalists have entered to report from the inside. There is also no shortage of reporting in Second Life, as several magazines and newspapers have already been published within the virtual world.

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-28 17:00

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The American Journalism Review recently took a look at the Examiner free daily’s editorial model as the paper tries to hone itself as a solid journalistic endeavor while remaining a quick read.

The Examiner, owned by billionaire Philip Anschutz and published in San Francisco, Washington, and Balitimore, “is trying to take a news-lite model as its foundation and build a decent journalism reputation on it,” says AJR.

But is it succeeding?

In 2005, the Project for Excellence in Journalism studied the Washington Examiner compared with three tabloids and the front-section stories in three broadsheets. The paper offered more staff-written and longer-running articles than tabloids, but fell short of them in offering stories with more than one viewpoint.

Stephen Smith, executive editor of the Washington Examiner, thinks that the paper is doing just fine in establishing its place. "When it comes to our model in a strictly journalistic sense, I think it matches up with a kind of sensibility that is in part shaped by the Internet age and in part shaped by just the hurry-up pace of modern life," Smith says.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-28 16:01

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Associated Content (AC) founder Luke Beatty recently talked to Online Journalism Review about building a citizen journalism website that pays content producers for submissions.

Though AC may not directly relate to newspapers, Beatty’s business model, which has been successful thus far, could bring professional and amateur journalists closer together than ever before. Beatty founded AC in early 2005, wanting to “flatten the traditional relationship between content providers, consumers and advertisers.”

Beatty says that rather than concentrating on citizen coverage of breaking news, AC focuses on specific, personal “how-to” articles based on writers’ experience. He gives this article, on getting diagnosed with HIV, as an example of the kind of personalized content citizen journalism can provide.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-28 14:13

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As the World Association of Newspapers (WAN) 2007 World Young Reader Conference and Expo continued yesterday in Washington, DC, speakers from many news organizations offered tips on marketing news to young people, especially children.

Mhairi Campbell, executive editor of BBC Learning said that the key- which may seem obvious- is to talk to one’s audience, even though they are children. "Children are better equipped than we are," she said. “They navigate with impressive confidence, talking about their favorite web sites…and the brands that make up their purchase repertoire."

Paul Farrell, group marketing manager of the Irish Times Group, took an interesting viewpoint. "Age is becoming less and less relevant as a primary segmentation tool," he said, and recommended thinking about overall business objectives rather than trying to market to one particular audience segment.

“Younger customers in particular will see through promotional initiatives or buy into them solely on the basis of the deal as opposed to any long term affinity or relationship,” he added, stressing that traditional marketing campaigns will not work and that campaigns must embrace new media to pull in youth.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-28 13:00

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Online ad spending surpassed newspaper ad spending for the first time ever in 2006, thanks to a 41% increase. More than ever, newspapers must boost their digital operations.

Online spending rose 41% to over £2 billion in 2006, as television revenues fell and figures for the press stagnated.

Online ad spending represented 11.4% of total ad revenues. This compares with the global share of online ad spending at about 5.8% (about 7% in the US).

Newspapers’ ad share amounted to £1.9 billion, roughly 10.9% of the market.

"Advertisers are continuing to switch more of their budgets online to build their brands and interact with their customers," said Guy Phillipson, chief executive of IAB. "With consumers now enjoying even faster broadband and installing wireless routers in their homes, the growth of online advertising in the UK is set to continue unabated."

That the Internet has become UK’s second medium after television doesn’t have to be bad news for newspapers though. Based on their experience, they know how to collect user-generated content, blogs and videos in a presentable format online.

Source: Media Guardian

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Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2007-03-28 11:13

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Mark Glaser of MediaShift is back with a follow-up to his recent argument that serious journalism will not die with print; this time, he offers practical advice on how newspapers will operate online.

This list, he says, should help newsrooms make the transition to digital “in both deed and mindset.”

- Include outside, community voices in every phase of newsgathering, reporting, and follow-up – Have blogs and forums available to discuss possible subjects to cover, and allow replies to stories to continue dialogue and fix mistakes. Databases of citizen journalists can help you find sources. Don’t just ignore follow-up comments and concerns; actively take part in the conversation.

- Give each regular topic of coverage its own website with a “Topic Chief”, a paid editor/reporter who will run a main blog and watch over tiers of contributors, ranging all the way to citizen journalists.

-Look for multitasking staff - One person can write stories, blog, and go on camera for video pieces. “Topic Chiefs” should be multimedia experts.

- Think in multimedia – Post photos and video whenever and wherever possible and relevant. “What were once called ‘web extras’ will now just be ‘web stories’ complete with the extras baked in,” says Glaser.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-28 10:06

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The Press Complaints Commission (PCC) has decided in favor of the Daily Mirror in the case communities secretary Ruth Kelly brought against the paper in January for revealing that she decided to send her child to private school.

Though the Mail broke the story, the Mirror was the first to name Kelly, and the rest of the media followed. The paper did not name Kelly’s nine-year-old son, who has special needs.

Kelly argued that by naming her, the Mirror had in effect named her son and therefore unnecessarily intruded on his school experience, thus breaking PCC code. If a newspaper does interfere with a child under 16’s schooling, it must be due to an “exceptional public interest to override the normally paramount interest of the child.” Kelly felt that this matter did not serve enough public interest to satisfy the code.

Though the PCC understood Kelly’s concerns, they said the story “raised questions about the nature of publicly-funded schooling and its ability to cater for children with special needs,” and that the Mirror took enough care in protecting the child’s identity.

The ruling should serve as a guideline for journalists in future privacy versus freedom of information ethical dilemmas.

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Lindsay Berrigan

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2007-03-27 17:03

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The British Press Awards were held last night at Grosvenor House, London, with the Daily Mirror and the Guardian coming out on top.

Host newsreader Jon Snow opened the show by agreeing with the Independent’s Simon Kelner that newspapers are here to stay and will weather the digital revolution.

The Daily Mirror and the Guardian garnered four awards each while the Financial Times, Mail on Sunday, and the Sunday Times each got two.

The Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph, Daily Mail, the Times, the Herald, and the Independent won one apiece. The Observer also took just one, but for the high honor of newspaper of the year.

Source: Media Guardian

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Lindsay Berrigan

Date

2007-03-27 16:31


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