WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


March 2006

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In many countries the average age of newspaper readers is over 50. Younger generations are not replacing older readers. Instead they are accustomed to getting their news from free papers and free Internet sites, essentially making them the "free generation."

What can newspapers do to adapt to the changing habits of youth? The 13th World Editors Forum being held in Moscow from June 4-7 will explore new strategies that newspapers can use in connecting with the "free generation."

The Forum's wide array of choice speakers will discuss such pertinent topics as:

  • embracing citizen journalism
  • offering multimedia services
  • developing weekend editions and supplements
  • adapting news to various platforms

With already 600 editors and publishers from around the globe on their way to Moscow eager to learn about the most innovative ideas in the newspaper industry, this is a conference you can't miss! Sign up now!

Source: 13th World Editors Forum Programme, Participant's list

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John Burke

Date

2006-03-31 18:18

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The Internet has arguably been the biggest boon to newshounds since the first newshound scanned his first headline. The nearly infinite amount of content available at the click of a mouse has liberated the reader, creating a freedom that he fears could be taken away by the very newspapers that feed his obsession. At the same time, newspapers are having trouble surviving on the very tool their readers now take for granted. Below are some ideas of how newspapers can keep their readers happy while simultaneously earning revenue.

Unbundling content: It is well known that traditional newspaper subscription models are proving difficult to implement online. Various plans have been tested but nothing seems to be working as well as newspaper publishers would like.

It has been said that the wide array of choice that a reader has on the Internet nullifies a packaged subscription model because much of what traditionally comes in those models does not interest the reader.

The example of iTunes is often evoked. iTunes allows users to purchase individual songs but also complete albums if the user is a huge fan of the artist. It does the same with television programs; one episode or the complete season. Users are so happy with their freedom of choice that more than 1 billion songs have been downloaded and in their short existence (since October 2005), television program downloads are well into the millions.

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John Burke

Date

2006-03-31 17:51

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Norwegian publishing house Schibsted ASA has bought 99.9% of the free Lithuanian daily paper 15min for an undisclosed sum. 15min is published five days a week and has a circulation of 85,000 after its release on September 1 last year.

In Lithuania, Schibsted already holds a 67% stake in the magazine publishing group Zurnalu Leidybine Grupe, and a 51% stake in the LT newspaper. Schibsted also recently purchased a Russian community newspaper (see former posting).

Source: Finanz Nachricten

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Author

Diana Epstein

Date

2006-03-31 16:34

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Newspaper The Hindu is planning to launch an SMS service that sends news updates to mobile phones. The Hindu will work with IMImobile, who provides content services and mobile value-added services, allowing users to get news, sports, entertainment, poll updates, and contests on their mobile phone.

News will be provided almost around-the-clock with news updates occurring between 6 am and midnight.

A press release from The Hindu quoting a spokesperson said, “We are catering to a generation that is ‘always on’ – a generation that demands news and information faster than the one that preceded it….The new service is in line with our tradition to reinvent ourselves in various formats as technology advances.”

Surveys show that people are unwilling to pay more for mobile content (see former posting) but it appears that this isn’t stopping anyone. The Hindu joins newspapers in the UK, France, and the United States in the trend integrating newspaper brands with mobile media.

Source: Exchange 4 Media [Through the Ifra Executive News Service]

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-31 16:11

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Counter to the recent trend of turning broadsheet newspapers to tabloid size papers, the India Today Group is planning to transform its afternoon tabloid into a morning broadsheet. The New Delhi tabloid “Today” will also have more pages as the paper plans to also increase the number of page from 16 to 20.

The newspaper is set to hit the stands around November of this year. According to an informed industry source, the group is planning to invest around Rs 100-150 crore in the makeover.

Source: Agencyfaqs [Through the Ifra Executive News Service]

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Diana Epstein

Date

2006-03-31 14:03

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Backed by the American Press Institute, a new project titled Newspaper Next has selected six newspapers to aid and use as “living laboratories to demonstrate the innovation potential that exists among newspaper companies,” said Stephen Gray, managing director of Newspaper Next.

The project will produce a report later this year, which will cover the lessons learned from the six papers and it hopes to test some of the projects conclusions at a daily newspaper by early 2007.

“It’s a great group of projects, They range in focus from audiences to advertisers to building organizational capabilities,” said Gray.

Examples of the project:

  • Gannett Co., which will pick one of its midsize papers to develop an organization structure conducive to innovation -- a structure adaptable to smaller and larger papers.
  • The Boston Globe, part of The New York Times Co., which wants to create new mechanisms and models to deliver profitable leads and sales to businesses too small for traditional big-paper solutions
  • Media General in Richmond, Va., plans to experiment with research techniques to gain new, unique insights into problems that Richmond businesses can’t solve with today’s advertising programs

Source: Ad Age

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Author

Diana Epstein

Date

2006-03-31 13:50

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The recent purchase of MySpace by News Corp. has yet to show data proving Murdoch’s purchase will make a killing on the acquisition but MySpace is still exploding in popularity.

But as the Internet social networking site MySpace moves up from the 14th most popular site in the world to the eighth, Murdochs purchase is showing a lot of promise. The site has recently been named the second most popular on the Internet in terms of page views.

"It looks like the best acquisition we've made in a long, long time," chief operating officer of News Corp.' Peter Chernin told Fortune magazine. "MySpace is the single biggest growth opportunity this company has."

Purchased for $580 million merely eight months ago, MySpace is looking like the purchase of the century.

Source: Forbes and Market Watch

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-31 13:15

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The Euro-Mediterranean Parliamentary Assembly met in Brussels to approve a resolution, which "condemned the offence" caused by the Danish cartoons of the prophet Mohammed as well "as the violence which their publication provoked."

MEPs and national MPs from the EU and Mediterranean countries met for two days drafting resolutions, one of which urged governments to "ensure respect for religious beliefs and to encourage the values of tolerance, freedom and multiculturalism."

Danish parliamentarian MP Troels Poulsen, reacting to criticism on Danish society over the issue, insisted that Danish society is based on both freedom of expression and religious tolerance. He also said that the government can not influence the media and the violent reaction to the cartoons was disproportionate.

Source: The Euro Observer

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-31 13:02

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Designed to save $17 million dollars a year starting in 2006, the Wall Street Journals change from a broadsheet to a more compact tabloid format has not met its readers approval. Dow Jones and Co. Inc plans to “retool” its Wall Street Journal Asian and European newspaper editions, two editions struggling to stay afloat.

Some readers feel "there is less of a paper than before," said Chief Executive Officer Richard Zannino.

The company had hoped that readers would see that there have been no content changes and that it is only a matter of becoming accustomed to the new size.

"Readers' reaction overall is positive -- not as positive as some other things we've done, so we are going to correct a little there. Retool it a bit," he said

Although changes will occur, Zannino failed to specify what they would entail. After a recent management reshuffle, job cuts and newspaper resizing, money-saving tactics still need to keep the newspapers' readers in mind.

Source: Reuters

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Author

Diana Epstein

Date

2006-03-31 12:54

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The Spanish free newspaper market is one of the most successful in the world. Almost half of the papers distributed in the country are free, a free paper tops the circulation charts, and three of the top four general interest newspapers do not have a cover price. Juan Varela at Periodistas 21 interviewed editors-in-chief from 2 of the top free papers as well as one from a new free publication which added a twist to its business model with a daily evening paper.

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John Burke

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2006-03-31 10:53

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After months of speculation Austrian publisher Wolfgang Fellner finally announced on Tuesday (28.3.06) that its new innovative newspaper would launch in September. The new national newspaper called Österreich (=Austria) will be in a 251x340 mm tabloid format, somewhat higher than the tabloids usually are in Austria, e.g. 20% higher than competitor Kronenzeitung. Fellner also told that USA Today served as an example for the new paper.

The name Österreich is meant to reflect the Austrian awareness said Fellner, who is a leading magazine publisher in Austria. There might be some small changes in the name, e.g. to add "24", but the principle name will be Österreich. The paper will start with a daily print run of 250,000 copies, on Sundays 600,000. The paper will launch on September 18. Those who subscribe before the launch will receive the paper already 2 weeks prior to the official launch. In addition Fellner plans a free version of Österreich. In any case, Fellner seems to make the launch a big event. Some rumors even say that pop star Madonna will sing at the launch party.

The paper is looking for a readership between the successful tabloid Kronenzeitung (circulation about 850,000) and Kurier (240,000).

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Author

Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2006-03-30 22:40

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Press group HFM and Sporever, a sports news company most notably online, have announced the creation of a collective company to develop audiovisual services for mobile phones.

The union of these companies will create a specialized collective dealing in projects focused on mobile phones giving users practical information, news coverage and interviews, games, etc for their mobile phone.

In this partnership HFM carries the brand, editorial content whereas Sporever has an expertise in audiovisual production and marketing in mobile services for mass markets.

Seeing an opportunity to capitlize on the 2 million plus mobile phone users in France, HFM and Sporever will take a step into a realm many are not. With an unpromising willingness of the public in North America (see former posting) to pay for additional mobile services, this partnership may be successful in France.

Source: Le Monde [Through the Ifra Executive News Service]

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 17:39

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In a speech by media commentator and former editor of The Daily Mirror Roy Greenslade at The Newspaper Society's CEP 2006, he outlined his beliefs of how newspapers should adapt to the media revolution that is putting print in jeopardy.

"None of us can deny that the only game in town now is multi-platform journalism combined with multi-platform advertising," he said.

Newspapers must join the multi-platform world:
Greenslade said the industry should use the newspaper brand as an umbrella for its multi-platform approach and that resources must be allocated sensibly in this multi-platform environment. He also said the industry needs to begin training journalists on these different platforms.

“That means devoting resources to websites, innovating with podcasting, targeting mobile phone alerts, branching out into digital TV, editing material for personal video recorders and enthusing over how to utilise e-newspapers, the inkless paper reader that doesn't require newsprint.”

The threat of BBC:
Greenslade calls BBC’s impact on regional and local newspapers “frightening” and a “major concern” as it increases its online capabilities and spending on journalism.

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 16:55

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As part of a plan to reduce costs, Dutch publisher Wegener is cutting 327 jobs along with converting its seven daily newspapers to tabloid format with a standardized formula. The company said it expected the restructuring to lead to annual cost savings of 25 million euros ($31 million).

The newspapers serve the eastern and southern parts of the Netherlands with a daily circulation of more than 800,000 copies.

Source: Reuters [Through the Ifra Executive News Service]

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Author

Dominique Lewis Tuohy

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2006-03-30 16:24

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Freelance journalist working for the Christian Science Monitor Jill Carroll has been freed by her Iraqi captors. Kidnapped on January 7, Carroll was scheduled to be executed on February 26 if the captors demands were not met. There had been no word from or about her until today when she was released after almost three months.

Source: New York Times

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John Burke

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2006-03-30 14:50

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Spain's 2 largest top-shelf papers, El Pais and El Mundo, are showing their tech savvy to their readers with initiatives meant to enhance the reading experience and claim a stake for the role of newspapers in the digital age.

El Pais has come a long way from once being a fully paid-for subscription site. Now, after opening up to all readers as of May 2005, it has launched a constantly updated Internet supplement that can be downloaded in PDF format and printed by the reader.

The publication, entitled 24 Horas, is not only an attempt to bring readers to El Pais' website which is dominated by that of El Mundo, but also to compete with Spain's rapidly growing and popular free paper market. By being able to download and print the paper before their morning commute, readers may opt to read articles from El Pais in 24 Horas rather than the shortened wire stories and local coverage printed in free papers.

The PDF/print option could, however, soon be outdated if epapers are to gain popularity among consumers. Instead of printing it out, readers could simply download 24 Horas onto their tablets. Still, the print option is a good one as newspapers need to pander to as many interests as possible; many readers may never purchase an epaper device.

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 14:24

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Hearst, in a deal with The Mobile Media Company, will provide mobile content to young female readers of the current issues of Cosmopolitan, CosmoGirl!, and Seventeen magazines. Selling ringtones, cell phone wallpapers and daily horoscopes via text message, this portal-style presence brings the Hearst brand one step further into the hands of its readers.

Readers will also have access to free and premium media. So far Hearst plans to work with two additional mobile technology providers Bango and Volantis who will help handle content delivery and billing. Hearst has also established a digital unit and has hired two executives to help run Hearst’s digital endeavors.

The Hearst move follows a recent announcement from Dennis Publishing’s Maxim magazine, a magazine for men, which said it would enhance its mobile content offerings.

The system will work across all wireless carriers.

Source: ClickZ News

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 14:18

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Advertising Age's Media Guy Simon Dumenco recently broadsided New York Times chairman Arthur Sulzberger's "platform agnostic" mantra by declaring newspapers need to become "platform proactive." Dumenco's vision of a proactive paper is one that publishes certain kinds of stories in the medium that fits them most. A recent study about women's Internet habits shows why being proactive will work.

Media Post reports that the latest EIAA Digital Women Report has found that this year European men may yield to the fairer sex, as so far as Internet use is concerned. Furthermore, a 2005 Pew Internet and American Life Report showed that women in the States are connecting in droves and are right on the heels of men.

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John Burke

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2006-03-30 13:06

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The Exeter Express & Echo has recently redesigned to fit in twice the content per page then before. These changes follow research that showed readers liked the paper but wanted more local news.

Using smaller headline fonts and switching from caps to upper and lower case, the design is now content-led, costs the paper fewer pages (then if it were to add content normally) and is said to be “easier on the eyes.”

"Since arriving in Exeter the message I received from readers was consistent - they liked what we did but wanted more of it, said editor Marc Astley. "However, we have a significant challenge here in that we serve dozens of micro-communities, all very different from one another in terms of their geography and demographic make-up."

Instead of printing different editions, the paper combines everything communities need to know. But the changes extend to include a revamped weekend leisure section, with new pages dedicated to shopping, fashion, homes and entertainment. In a market where an increasing amount of newspapers are cutting out content in order to save money, The Echo’s solution is to just pack more into one page.

Source: Hold The Front Page [Through the Ifra Executive News Service]

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 13:06

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The Associated Press confirmed using a story from blog RawStory.com as the basis for a March 14th article detailing a change in national security policies.

The information in the article written by the AP, “Security Clearance Rules May Impede Gays,” attributed its information to gay rights groups, who happened to be wrong and who received their information from Raw Story. The discovery was made by Larisa Alexandrovna, Raw Story's Managing News Editor, and John Byrne, Raw Story's Executive Editor.

According to Raw Story, they “picked the wording out of an extended document released in December [and the] AP ran a story the following day, highlighting the same item and using similar language.”

Two gay rights groups confirmed they had used Raw Story’s articles and notes as the basis of their conversation with the AP reporter. The AP later admitted they had learned of the article from the Raw Story site.

AP’s Director of Media Relations Jack Stokes said the reason Raw Story wasn’t credited in the Mar. 14 article was because the bureau “hadn’t heard of” Raw Story, and because they had received the article from third-party groups. He said the agency would be issuing a statement on the issue soon.

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 12:54

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The Moroccan daily Le Matin will launch its first Gulf edition as Morocco’s leading publishing group Maroc Soir invests in the region for the first time. The Saudi president of the publishing group, Otman al-Omeir has reportedly met the King of Bahrain Hamad al-Khalifa to discuss the editorial plan. The paper is set to attract 500.000 readers, the number of francophone residents in the Gulf.

Source: Adnkronos International [Through the European Journalism Centre newsletter]

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Diana Epstein

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2006-03-30 11:26

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Should newspapers welcome citizen journalists? That's the focus of the first session of the 13th World Editors Forum, which starts Sunday, June 4 in Moscow. The citizen journalism movement is accelerating around the world and more newspapers are integrating readers and bloggers in the news process. But what are the consequences for quality newspaper journalism? By inviting their public to participate, are newspapers harming their primary function or is citizen journalism a useful means of maintaining relationships with the "free generation?"



Wikipedia and newspapers: two forms of collective intelligence

Jimmy Wales, Director and Founder, Wikipedia, USA

Jimmy is the founder of Wikipedia.org, the free encyclopedia project, and Wikicities.com, which extends the social concepts of Wikipedia into new areas. He is currently president and chairman of the board for the Wikimedia Foundation, a Tampa-based non-profit organization he helped form in mid 2003 to support Wikipedia and its sister projects. He was formerly a futures and options trader in Chicago.

Wikipedia

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Robb Montgomery

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2006-03-30 10:47

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They might think that they're "getting it" but according to some media pundits, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal are still dragging their feet in the transition to digital.

Simon Dumenco at Advertising Age is not only sick of hearing the death tolls of the newspaper industry, but he declares that the New York Times is committing "slow-motion suicide." He's dumbstruck that the Gray Lady has just cut its stock tables from the print edition, something he says should have been done years ago.

In Dumenco's view, instead of newspapers being "platform-agnostic," as NYT chairman Arthur Sulzberger Jr. said a few years ago, they should be "platform proactive," meaning they should use only the medium that best serves the story; for example, making music reviews available as podcasts and art reviews on the website with plenty of images to accompany and enrich the story.

Former Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of Financial World Magazine, Douglas McIntyre, writes on the Media Stock blog that Dow Jones, the publisher of The Wall Street Journal, has "probably missed the opportunity" to take full advantage of the Internet and that it may not be able to recover.

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John Burke

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2006-03-30 10:39

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A national weekly newspaper for children is in the works. First News, which is tailored to a "young yet inquisitive audience" the editorial team said, will begin printing in May. Subscription-based, the paper will target nine- to 12-year-olds with a mixed content of current affairs, sports, science and entertainment news.

Editorial director of the new paper will be former Daily Mirror editor Piers Morgan. First News editor will be Nicky Cox, who was previously editorial director of BBC Worldwide's family division and worked on another children's newspaper titled Early Time.

"I first had the idea for a national children's newspaper years ago and I am so excited it is actually happening. This is a unique product, there is nothing like it on the market at the moment,” said Cox.

The paper, which will initially print 300.000 copies, expects to include high profile celebrity contributions in the first issue.

Source: DM Bulletin

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Diana Epstein

Date

2006-03-29 17:21


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