WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Mon - 23.10.2017


July 2005

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As New York Business reports "News Corp. deputy Chief Operating Officer Lachlan Murdoch ... resigned from his father Rupert Murdoch's flagship media company" and will step down by August 31. He was seen as a possible heir to his father's leadership of News Corp. According to NEWS.com.au Lachlan Murdoch stated: "I look forward to returning home to Australia with my wife, Sarah, and son, Kalan... I will remain on the board and I am excited about my continued involvement with the company in a different role." According to Business Week Ruport Murdoch said: "I was particularly saddened by my son's decision and thank him for his terrific contribution to the company."

Sources: New York Business,News.com.au, Business Week

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Author

Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-29 17:41

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Considered by some to be the ultimate test of whether or not newspaper websites will be able to charge for content in the future, the New York Times' pay model TimesSelect is receiving harsh criticism from loyal Times readers and of course, the blogosphere. Poynter's Steve Outing has received a number of emails slamming the Times' decision and concluded, "What I picked up from this pile of e-mail is that many people view the Times' columnists as fulfilling an important global public-service role, and that by publishing them freely on the Web for so many years, they spread ideas around the world that need to be read widely. The times is being judged on its mission of serving the public good, not shareholders... Something the times may have damaged here is its global impact." One of Outings' emails came from a devoted Times subscriber who said, "Yes, I can afford to subscribe to TimesSelect, but I will not. I have canceled my delivery of the paper, as well."

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Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-29 17:12

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There have been many discussions about the contradiction between the huge profits that media giants demand and their newsrooms' role of producing quality journalism. Journalists feel that their publications, and their communities, are suffering greatly because of newsroom staff cuts which their corporate benefactors deem necessary in order to increase revenues as much of their audience and advertising migrates to new media, especially the Internet.

The Internet also furnishes a platform for journalism, but it has not yet been determined if it will be able to provide society with the kind of reporting it needs to remain informed.

In this respect, journalism is caught in a tug-of-war whose opposing sides are the old guard, which is seemingly cannibalizing it, and new media, which isn't quite yet sure how to embrace it. Depending on which side wins, either a brand new news model will emerge or journalism will be torn apart in the fight?

"Lines blur in the new media world. The only line that doesn’t is the bottom one: profit."

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-29 17:12

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On Thursday Princess Caroline von Hannover and Germany reached a friendly settlement in one of the most controversial cases in media law. Germany will pay 115,000 Euro to Caroline, 105,000 for cost and expenses and 10,000 Euro for non-pecuniary damage. The impetus of the case were photographs appearing in German magazines showing Caroline shopping, riding or biking. According to Netzeitung (in German) in particular photos showing Caroline with a bald head triggered her to fight against the paparazzi.

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Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-28 19:04

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Judith Miller, the New York Times reporter that chose to go to give up her freedom instead of giving up the name of an anonymous source, was released on Thursday, September 29 after agreeing to testify in a grand jury investigation. Miller, who had been incarcerated for almost 3 months, received direct clearance from her source, US Vice President Dick Cheney's Chief of Staff Lewis Libby, that repealed all obligations of confidentiality. She will now be allowed to talk freely in front of a grand jury investigating the outing of a CIA agent that could have grave consequences for the Bush administration. After being released, Miller said, "I went to jail to preserve the time-honored principle that a journalist must respect a promis not to reveal the identity of a confidential source. I chose to take the consequences, 85 days in prison, rather than violate that promise. The principle was more important to uphold than my personal freedom."

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Author

John Burke

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2005-07-28 17:45

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Print as an advertising medium "cannot yet be put out to pasture", concluded a majority of five panelists at the Print Forecast panel in Manhattan on Monday, reports MediaDailyNews. Jason Klein, president and CEO of the Newspaper National Network (NNN) said, "The trends are not exactly what we would like, but I think the reports of print's death are greatly exaggerated." He also pointed to the NNN's recent study that showed newspapers are "the engagement media" and therefore attractive to advertisers (see former posting).

However, Charlie Rutman, CEO of Media Planning Group (MPG) North America, countered, "Dying may be a little extreme, but the medium is definitely on a resuscitator." Pointing to recent scandals regarding cirulation controversies and weak numbers he said, "once burned, twice shy. It's happened too often - clients are nervous, we're nervous."

Source: MediaDailyNews

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Author

John Burke

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2005-07-28 17:45

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On September 12, the European Parliament hosted a debate on the use of weblogs. The debate was one of three debates on the implications of the information society. Pointing to the differences between blogs and traditional media, Karlin Lillington, technology journalist at the Irish Times, said that "journalists face libel laws, whereas some bloggers behave as if they're in the Wild West. Bloggers will state things without saying where they got them from. And increasingly, blogs are used to promote products without making this clear".

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-28 16:58

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In June, the San Jose Mercury News eliminated the traditional local, national, and international news print sections and combined them into one (see previous posting). The change was controversial and many readers did not like it. A big problem was: it was now much harder for couples to share the morning paper.

Now the paper responds to readers' feedback: "OK, we hear you. Beginning Tuesday, Aug. 30, we'll go back to having two news sections: The first section will focus on national and international news, the second on local and state news. Page One will continue to offer an average of 75 percent locally written stories and the watchdog reports you find only in the Mercury News", wrote MercuryNews.com on August 21. The paper keeps, however, some changes that readers liked, such as news highlights on Page One, international pages clearly labeled by region, Monday's Calendar, Friday's new Interactive Arts + Entertainment section etc.

Source: MercuryNews.com

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-28 16:58

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Responding to an e-mail by a reader blaming the Los Angeles Times to be too left-wing in its news coverage, Jon Friedman writes on MarketWatch: "What readers refuse to concede is that even if a media organization does have a bias - and, yes, many do, in both political directions - they still have a professional obligation to report on the news. Most do a decent, if not a good, job at it". He suggests that, perhaps due to those readers "the media generally are trying harder to shed the long-held belief that they are liberal rebels with a cause."

"I am noticing that the news networks are trying to look more balanced. Their biggest problem is perception. Viewers seem to think they have a conspiracy against the American people to present only one side of the news" states Bob Thompson, professor of pop culture at Syracuse University, on MarketWatch.

Source: Market Watch

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Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-27 18:36

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Leaders of the Russian press and foreign publishers and editors, meeting in Moscow to discuss press freedom problems, were stood up by a senior Kremlin official who pulled out of the programme at the last minute. "Another brilliant public relations coup to improve the Kremlin's image on press freedom and independence", said – ironically - Timothy Balding, Director General of the World Association of Newspapers, which organised the meeting together with the World Editors Forum and the Russian Guild of Press Publishers (GIPP), during Publishing Expo 2005, which ends in Moscow today, Thursday.

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John Burke

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2005-07-27 16:43

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As newspapers are not doing very well in terms of ad revenue (see previous posting), some think of new ways to attract advertisers. One such way is to accept shadow ads. 'Shadow ads', or 'watermark ads', are "shadowy images of corporate logos, movie characters, or other images" that turned up on stock tables, movie listings and sports data pages in newspapers (see Editor & Publisher from June). "News content is superimposed on images including corporate logos", writes The Philadelphia Inquirer. Shadow ads are not directly new and have been in sporadic use over the past years. In 2001, for example, Universal Studios had shadow-like ads in 15 newspapers in the US to promote its film "Jurassic Park II". "The images of flying dinosaurs appeared on tables of agate, or data, such as stock tables", reports Editor & Publisher . Such advertisements are, however, highly controversial with some editors being afraid that the line between editorial and advertising might be crossed.

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John Burke

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2005-07-27 16:43

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Truth in general exists in 2 forms: in the object itself and in the mind of the perceiver argues Robert Lazaro in a comment in The Manila Times, found through Mediachannel. So the truth for an individual is always depending on how he perceives reality which is also dependent on his convictions. This is similar to what scholars in psychology often find. Regarding journalism Robert Lazaro points out that "when a journalist perceives the truth in his object, he has already taken sides without realizing that he is probably being subjective in so doing". Nevertheless he thinks of truth as "a guiding principle and an ultimate end of the journalist... Truth in journalism is not an empty play of words but a straight-to-the-point reality ... Deadlines, competition for newsbreaks and the need to catch public attention are not excuses for inaccuracies, slanting or semantics."

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-27 13:15

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Product placement, which has transformed the TV advertising marketplace, is spreading its influence to all forms of media. At least that is what, according to MediaPostPublications, a new report by PQ Media, a Stamford-based media research firm, is suggesting. The report, which shall be published on Wednesday, estimates product placements in newspapers to rise 16.9 % to $65.0 million. MediaPostPublication states that even those numbers are small "the presence of any paid placements would seem troubling for editors or pride themselves on presenting objective news content that supposedly is not influenced by advertisers or other business interests."

Source: MediaPostPublication

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Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-27 10:36

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According to a report released by Goldman Sachs last week, "the newspaper sector is stuck in the mud", reports Editor & Publisher. Ad revenues for July were up 2.9% with August expected to be about the same. Retail was up 3% and "national has improved slightly (against easy comps). But what's worrisome is that classified ad growth is slowing", states Editor & Publisher.

The help wanted category continues to suffer from 'the burden with growth in the mid-teens' in online and print. The real estate category has slowed modestly and the automotive category is "exceptionally weak." And circulation revenues continue to decrease and were down 2.6% year-to-date. However, ad spending on newspapers' websites increased double-digit in recent quarters, reports The Philadelphia Inquirer.

"Taking all this into account, total industry revenue growth is about 2%, year-to-date, 'the industry's weakest performance since the 2001-2001 recession' ", states Editor & Publisher.

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Anna-Maria Mende

Date

2005-07-26 17:00

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WatchingAmerica.com is a website dedicated to showing Americans how their country is reported on in the foreign press. The site is edited by William Kern, former copy editor for the International Herald Tribune, and provides translations of interesting stories sourced from newspapers and broadcasts in Europe, The Middle East, Asia, Africa and Latin America.

No commentary is provided for any of the translated articles as the aim of the site is to be politically neutral.

Kern and his business partner British entrepreneur Robert Koerner view their site as responding to the growing interest among Americans in their country's image abroad. Kern says “With bookstores selling accounts of the anger that people of other nations feel toward the United States, the time seemed right to produce daily translations straight from overseas sources.”

The importance of translating articles from foreign sources is highlighted by Koerner, who asserts that there is a "key distinction" between information published in English by foreign media, and stories written in native languages. Koerner uses the following example: "What the Arabic press puts out for their home audience is very different from what they might publish for English-speaking readers.”

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-26 17:00

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We've talked a bit about the bottom line in a couple of recent postings (here and here) and how it's being affected by new technologies and changing reader habits. In June, top newspaper executives at the Newspaper Association of America's (NAA) Future of the Newspaper conference acknowledged the transforming media landscape, heralding the necessity for investment in technology, giving more power to the consumer and innovation in general. But when reading through an account of the meeting in the NAA's magazine Presstime, it doesn't seem like they're sure what to do about it.

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John Burke

Date

2005-07-26 14:13

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According to Brand Republic The Times is relaunching its T2 daily supplement as Times2 and hopes to attract female readers to purchase the paper. Times2 will have more pages, more colour pages and new ad formats. New sections will include style, health, sounds and men. According to Brand Republic this is "the first time the paper is running an ad campaign specifically targeting women to back the relaunch. The £1 million-plus campaign ... targets a cross-section of women: professionals, housewives and mothers."

Source: Brand Republic

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John Burke

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2005-07-26 14:13

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According to the latest Annual Euro RSCG Magnet and Columbia University Survey of the Media, 51% of journalists, combared to 11% of all US internet users (according to eWeek), are using weblogs regularly and 28% rely on them for their daily reporting. By contrast, only 1% of journalists believe in their credibility. The study is based on responses of 1,202 journalist from the US and other countries worldwide (no further details regarding the other countries given on Euro RSCG Magnet ). Of journalist who reported using blogs 70% use blogs for work-related tasks: they use blogs to find story ideas, researching and referencing facts, finding sources and uncovering breaking news. However, only few journalists post on blogs or have their own blogs. "Such activities might be seen as compromising objectivity and thus credibility."

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2005-07-26 14:13

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"Broadly speaking, there are three factors that need to be considered by the print media – the consumer’s need for uninterrupted entertainment, the advertiser’s need to reach out to its TG and the need of the medium to deliver relevant content", said Pradeep Guha, member of directors board at DNA, an English-language newspaper, and CEO of Zee Telefilms at yesterday's seminar on "The Future of Print Media", reports agencyfaqs!. Guha underlined that newspapers will have to connect to young people if they want to survive.

The seminar organized by the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) focussed on challenges print is facing in the future. Tariq Ansari, managing director at Mid-Day said, "Differentiated content is crucial for newspapers. The ones who achieve it are the only ones that will survive.? Jayant Mammen Matthew, editor and senior general manager at Malayala Manorama said, "The future of newspapers will be to offer local news. And the main challenge will be to make sure that the local news does not go down the road of local irrelevance." Writer Shobhaa De said, "According to me, the real challenge faced by newspapers today is how to marry credibility with commerce. It is how to survive in the business, and at the same time, be able to grab the attention of those whom one is addressing."

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John Burke

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2005-07-25 16:02

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"Beware: tomorrow's stars are no longer necessarily interested in yesterday's media." This warning from media pundit Jeff Jarvis comes after a chat he had with a young German journalist who has rapidly gained recognition, but not for work in print, television or radio. Larissa Vassilian is the brain behind the popular podcast, Schlaflos in Munchen (Sleepless in Munich).

Vassilian produces a 5-minute recap of her life and muses thereof including reviews of movies, books, etc. through another podcast called Filme und So (Movies and Stuff). She does so all from the comfort of home with very minimal overhead - only about $100 for technical equipment and $10 a month for an Internet connection.

With this small investment, Vassilian attracts 5-16 thousand people and is one of the top 10 downloaded German podcasts. Jarvis says her story demonstrates the danger posed to old media by like ventures; "it's hard for talent to rise and survive in your institutions. But on the internet, with her podcasts and thousands of faithful fans, Vassilian has the freedom to be herself."

Although she has a solid following, podcasting doesn't pay... yet. Vassilian continues her work as a journalist to survive but if she had her way, she'd make her living online. With more people turning to the Internet and more journalists like Vassilian going it solo online, functioning business models are certain to emerge. Old media has to adapt.

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John Burke

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2005-07-25 16:02

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Dilpazier Aslam, a trainee journalist of The Guardian, had his contract terminated following an internal inquiry into his membership of Hizb ut-Tahrir, a radical Islamic group (see former posting). After first backing him, the newspaper stated on Friday: “The Guardian now believes continuing membership of the organisation to be incompatible with his continued employment by the company. Mr Aslam was asked to resign his membership but has chosen not to.”

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-25 13:56

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From broadsheet to tabloid to Berliner - where next for newspaper formats? The World Association of Newspapers (WAN) has been studying the format change phenomenon, and will present the results at the World Editor & Marketeer Conference, to be held in Athens, Greece, on 17 and 18 November next.

The study, part of the WAN Shaping the Future of the Newspaper (SFN) project, examines the drivers, highlights the opportunities and determines the risk of format change. The SFN session includes a presentation from Marc Sands, the Marketing Director of Guardian Newspapers of the United Kingdom, and will also feature others who are making the change from broadsheet to tabloid or even smaller formats.

In addition to the format change research, SFN will provide the Editor & Marketeer Conference with a special "master class" in which best practice methodologies to increase circulation sales will be presented. The class
will be conducted by Jim Chisholm, Director of the SFN project. Other conference sessions will focus on content delivery that exploits digital media opportunities to gain both readers and revenues, on 'new weapons' in the battle for readers, on young readers, on how to increase purchase frequency and subscription renewal and develop long-term readers who can be retained economically and on maximizing revenues between print and online.

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-22 16:40

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The World Health Organisation (WHO) has issued a handbook containing information on avian flu which can be downloaded from the WHO website in PDF format.

The organisation describes the document as follows: "It's an introduction to everything you need to know about influenza, including about avian influenza and the potential for a pandemic."

It is a tool designed to help ensure factual reporting on the issue: "For journalists already familiar with avian and pandemic influenza, the handbook is an indispensable fact-checking reference. For those new to the issues, it's a pandemic primer to help put reporting in context, and a source for essential facts and figures."

As the situation changes updates will be posted on the WHO website.

Source: WHO (through the EJC newsletter)

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-22 16:40

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Barry Sussman, editor of the Watchdog Project of the Nieman Foundation and at the time of the Watergate scandal special Watergate editor at the Washington Post, writes in an article on journalism.org: “The reason Deep Throat remained anonymous, so that even Post Editors didn’t know who he was, is that his contribution was unimportant. Don’t believe for a minute that Bradlee wouldn’t have asked his name had the Post’s reputation been riding on what he was telling us." He explains that Deep Throat/Mark Felt, despite all the myths about him, was in fact helping the newspaper only once and then only approving facts which the reporters had already found out by themselves. His article gives a new perspective of the whole scandal and the persons involved, and puts the current debate on anonymous sources into new light (see former posting)

Source: journalism.org

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Anna-Maria Mende

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2005-07-22 15:53


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