WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


Federica Cherubini

1. Profile

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Federica
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Cherubini
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Programme manager
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WAN-IFRA
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6 years 12 weeks

Blog entries

"No comment".

Business executives had become more and more adept at hiding behind this phrase, argues David Carr of The New York Times in an article published on Sunday. Not only that, but major figures in business are often obscured by "communications" teams that are anything but communicative. But now, suggests Carr, "Twitter has the potential to cut past all that clutter".

Carr writes that thanks to Twitter "there's a chance to get a glimpse into the thinking of otherwise unapproachable executives, and sometimes even have a real dialogue with them".

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-31 18:26

Starting from the current issue The Economist will have a weekly section devoted to China, the paper's leader announced.

This is the first time since 1942, when the a US section was introduced, that the news magazine is dedicating an entire section to a single country, the article explained. Thematic sections and blogs as well as specific columns are usually focused on a geographical area, as Banyan, the blog dedicated to Asia, which takes its name from the Banyan tree under which Buddha attained enlightenment and Gujarati merchants used to conduct business.

The name for China blog has not yet been decided and the paper invited readers to send suggestions. It will ideally need to agree with the style and 19th-century origins of the other sections and columns names, from Bagehot, the column dedicated to Britain, which takes its name from Walter Bagehot, British constitutional expert and early editor of The Economist, to Baobab, the section focused on Africa and Middle East which owes its name to the African tree.

The reason for dedicating a whole section to just one country lies in the role of global superpower that China is gaining on economic as well as political level, The Economist explained.

Fast growing countries such China or India are increasingly becoming interesting focus for newspapers with an international audience. In September 2011 The New York Times launched India Ink, its "first-ever country-specific site", for news, information, culture and conversation.

On the other hand, countries like India, and some Latin American ones such as Brazil, are also proving to be areas with a particularly interesting growth of newspapers themselves.

India, for example, is "the world's fastest-growing newspaper market" accordingly to another Economist article, which notes however that the strength of the print press is in part down to the weakness of its online offerings.

Sources: Economist (1), (2), (3), Editors Weblog


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-27 17:24

What are the differences between Story Visualizations and Answer Visualizations?

Why human filters are the future of the web: the importance of role of real editors rather than algorithms online.

Latest numbers indicate New York Times traffic is flat since the paywall was implemented, says BuzzFeed (via Poynter).

Reporters Without Borders
reported that blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad, who had been detained for 10 months on a charge of insulting the armed forces, was released on 24 January. His release was reported on Twitter by his brother Mark.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-26 18:50

Six countries, six leading newspapers, a huge audience and one common theme: Europe, how to explain it better, how to understand it better, how to build it better. This is the aim of an editorial project which saw six papers joining forces to produce a joint special edition on the situation of the European Union.

"The state of the Union", echoing the State of the union speech US President Obama gave on 24 January, is the angle of the first issue of Europa (more will be expected in future) produced by El Pais, the Guardian, Le Monde, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Gazeta Wyborcza and La Stampa.

This joint special editorial supplement aims to give a "more nuanced picture of the EU and explore what Europe does well and what not so well", as the Guardian explained.

The idea underlying the project is that different eyes give different perspectives ("La croisée des regards" says Le Monde's title) and different perspectives can all contribute to build a more comprehensive understanding of the crisis, both economic and ideological, that is facing Europe.

Sylvie Kauffmann on Le Monde wrote: "Before becoming an economic union, Europe was a community linked by shared values". A community - she explained - whose daily reality consists of the experiences of European citizens everyday, commuting internationally for working, immigrating and emigrating and whose stories are the subject of this Europa issue.

The issue is built around conquering euroscepticism as well as national stereotyping which is reflected in the countries' leaders portraits viewed from one of the other foreign countries: Mario Monti viewed from Spain, Donald Tusk from Germany, Mariano Rajoy from Poland, David Cameron from France and Nicolas Sarkozy viewed from Britain. But the main article is a longer interview that Angela Merkel gave to the six newspapers jointly.

The Editors Weblog spoke to Marco Bardazzi, managing editor at La Stampa, who explained how the project was born and how it has been developed from an editorial point of view.

The table of contents has been chosen by the six newspapers together: Europa has been realised with a continuous discussion amongst all. Each paper suggested stories and wrote three articles for each thematic session, such as "The Europe which moves forward" and "The Europe which thinks."

Commons guidelines have been developed for layout, photos and content but each paper decided independently how to publish it. The Guardian published two pages on different days inside the usual daily edition while Le Monde, El Pais and La Stampa created a supplement, within the paper for Le Monde, external for La Stampa.

Readers from the six different countries can find the same content, translated into each language, in the package which was most suitable for each newspaper.

As the project's name suggests, the focus of next editions will remain Europe-centred although they could be built around specific topics as immigration or the common monetary politcs.

The role of newspapers is to offer readers different ways to understand the world and the project wants to help in create a common European identity through telling the stories of what brings us together and what tear us apart, Bardazzi said.

Sources: the Guardian, Le Monde, interview


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-26 17:59

Should reporters be aiming for print bylines? The Columbia Journalism Review reflects on why journalists still care about seeing their name in print.

The Knight Center's Journalism in the Americas Blog shares a list of crowd-sourcing websites from across Latin America. One example is the Mapa Delictivo, created by El Universal, which tracks crimes in Mexico City.

Poynter has published a discussion with Knight News Challenge winner Christina Xu about how microgrants can help fuel innovative journalism.

Nieman Lab reports that the Public Insight Network, American Public Media's network of sources, is hiring its own reporting team to turn more of the information that its members produce into stories.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-25 19:25

The Chicago Tribune has announced that it will be offering subscribers a new Sunday books section as a piece of premium paid content.

Printers Row, as the section will be called, will cost Tribune subscribers an additional $99 a year. Those who sign up will get a 24-page book supplement every Sunday, featuring reviews, interviews with authors and news from Chicago's literary scene as well as a free book of short stories each week.

The Chicago Tribune describes the launch in its own business section as "a means to bolster revenue beyond the traditional subscription and advertising model" by offering readers with niche interests a high-quality targeted product that they will be willing to pay for. Gerould Kern, senior vice president and editor of the Chicago Tribune states that "audiences want very specialized information, and we are going to give them that".

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-25 12:52

Public concern has been raised over media laws restricting freedom of the press in Hungary and South Africa, but less attention has been devoted to the worsening situation in Ecuador, where the news media are now under attack, writes George Brock, Professor and Head of Journalism at City University London, on his blog.

On January 24, the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) published a report that illustrates how the government of Ecuador is carrying out "a sophisticated strategy of marginalising all voices independent of state power".
Download the full report in English and Spanish here.

A survey reported by The Guardian today suggests that almost 70% of the British population distrust tabloid newspapers. However, Roy Greenslade argues that the question of trust it irrelevant for many tabloid readers, who are looking for entertainment, not information.

Everyone on Facebook will soon be getting Timeline, writes Techcrunch. The social network's new look is already available for those who want to opt in voluntarily, but it will be unrolled for all users in the next couple weeks.

And finally, Gizmodo reports that Julian Assange will be appearing on his own TV show.

For more industry news please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-24 19:16

NBCUniversal is getting into the eBook market. Digital Book World announced today that the media company is launching a publishing unit to make the most of the boom in tablet and eReader ownership.

The New York Times is working on a project called Deep Dive to allow readers to follow specific topics through the news. Nieman Lab reports that the Deep Dive uses meta data to find connections between articles and bring users the most relevant results.

Newspapers in Kentucky have launched a scheme to allow state radio to use their content, writes Kentucky.com.

The Chicago Sun Times has published an editorial explaining why it will no longer endorse political candidates: "As many of you have told us, you can make up your own mind, thank you very much."


For more industry news please see

WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.


Links

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-23 20:23

Want to learn how to program? An online book has just been released aimed at teaching absolute beginners how to use Ruby, a coding language used by many open source applications, such as Ruby on Rails.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-20 18:47

Liberalization of professional services is on the agenda of the Italian technocrat Mario Monti's government, as part of the wider plans to boost economy, from energy to transport.

Journalists appear to be amongst the professions listed in the regulation reform. Speculations about the alleged changes - the reform bill is a draft and hasn't been approved yet - that will involve the Ordine dei Giornalisti, the professional state-approved body representing Italian journalists, have raised concerns within the profession. It has also provided a boost to reinvigorate the long-time ongoing debate about the possibility of the abolition of the "extraordinary league of journalists".

The state-regulated body defines who, after passing an exam, can officially be called a journalist and has the power of sanction these people in case of ethical misconduct that can lead to their removal from the official journalists' list and a ban on exercising the profession.

The Ordine dei Giornalisti is quite an anomaly within the international journalism landscape and raises questions about state regulation in opposition to a self-regulated approach.

But how does access to the journalistic profession in Italy actually work, and is the Ordine really effective?

The online-only paper Linkiesta published a series of clear infographics illustrating the "disorganization of the journalist organization" (in Italian dis-ordine).

The journalists registered on official national list are 110,000. Of these 64.58% are members of the Pubblicisti register and 25.04% of the Professionisti.

'Professionisti' are the ones who exercise the profession "exclusively and continuously" while the 'pubblicisti' are those who exercise mainly other professions, for example laywers or doctors who write on thematic journals or as experts on specific issues.

However this distinction often doesn't reflect the reality of the situation as many 'pubblicisti' are just full-time journalists who haven't been able to be hired as trainees and do the official exam after the 18 month period of training necessary to be admitted to the exam.

It's worth noting, as the article reported, that the exam, which consists of a written and an oral part, has been taken on computers only from 2009, while before participants used typewriters.

The remaining 10,38% is divided between a "special list", trainee and foreign journalists.

To be member of the Ordine, doesn't imply any guarantee on a contract level, as the number of journalists hired under the official national collective agreement were just 21,269 in 2010.

The existence of a state-regulated list has been judged completely useless by some commentators, outside and inside the journalistic category.

Federico Rampini, one of the most authoritative names of the national daily Repubblica and a long-experienced foreign correspondent now based in New York, recently wrote on Micromega a very thorough article about the Ordine's worthlessness.

"I've been registered with the Ordine since 1982, when I passed an exam which had nothing to do with any knowledge and ability I needed to be a journalist", he wrote. In 24 years the Ordine hasn't proven useful for any of the purposes it's supposed to fulfil for, Rampini argues. No serious barriers have been placed against the threats to press freedom and news accountability which came from the tangle between media, politics and economic powers. "I can't remember any episode of "misinformation" - lies, false news, biased news - which has been revealed and punished with the due severity", he added.

Some claim that the Ordine is just a lobby interested just in safeguarding the interests of the profession.

The mere existence of a code of conduct and of a body intended to punish any violation does not necessarily mean that the sanction has an effect on the reputation and credibility the press holds amongst the public. A strong democracy needs a strong and credible press and the mere existence of a state-regulated body does not guarantee it.

Sources: Reuters, EW, Corriere della Sera, Linkiesta, Micromega


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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-20 16:20

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