WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


Young Readers

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The Dentsu advertising agency of Japan is helping Tokyo Shimbun try out a new approach to helping children digitally access the printed newspaper by using the paper’s augmented reality (AR) app.

For a one-day trial, Dentsu worked with newspaper staff to convert nine stories in the paper into a more easily understood format that became visible when a child held a smart phone over the original story. An animated character helped explain the story, which appeared in an alphabet more easily understood by children. You can see a video about the demonstration HERE

Continuing to use the app to help children better understand the news is under discussion, according to Yoshiro Kurauchi, head of the project for Tokyo Shimbun.

Tokyo Shimbun had already been using the same app, “Tokyo AR,” to show films linked to print advertisements. The youth project, done on 20 October 2012, also included four advertisements targeting parents and children. Dentsu reports that at least three companies have since launched dedicated newspaper ads that target both parents and children: Hato Bus (travel), Kirin (soft drinks)and  Meiji (yogurt).

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Author

Aralynn McMane

Date

2013-02-18 18:32

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A week from today, French radio station France Culture will launch a new web portal geared at luring the next generation of listeners to the airwaves via the Internet.

"France Culture Plus" as the new site is called, will mix content from campus radio stations with original work created by students specifically for the web platform, selects from the station’s own academically relevant programming, and audio and video recordings of university lectures and events.

The cultural radio station, which celebrates its 50th birthday next year, is not the only heritage media outlet in France to be reaching out to students this fall. Today, national television station France Télévisions announced “francetvéducation,” a free educational platform targeted at students, parents and teachers. At the end of October, daily newspaper Le Figaro also launched a website dedicated to students, www.lefigaroetudiant.fr.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-19 19:32

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Newspapers have until 4 May to submit an entry to the World Young Reader Prizes, the annual awards from the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) that recognize success in engaging the young.

The awards in five categories - Editorial, Making the News, Newspapers in Education (NIE), Public Service, and Brand - will honor newspaper companies that have devised the best projects and activities during the past two years to promote newspaper reading and usage, on all platforms, among those under 25.

Two special categories for 2012 are “Enduring Excellence,” to honor young reader programmes that have continued delivering benefits for both the newspaper and the young for at least two years, and “The Natasa Prize for Printing Plants,” for a newspaper printing plant action that teaches the young about journalism.

Judges are looking for innovative strategies that produce measurable results, particularly those that can be adapted for use in other countries. Use of multiple platforms is particularly encouraged.

Entries for all categories require creating a PowerPoint presentation following prize guidelines. Full details and online registration can be found here .

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-26 11:13

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Print circulation dropping, print advertising revenues down… In the current climate many newspaper companies are struggling just to survive.

Yet difficult as it is to break even, in itself it’s not enough. To have a future, media companies can’t simply find ways to slow the decline of their old print readership, they have to actively go out and find new young readers who will sustain their content in the days to come.

Inevitably, this means that newspapers have to make sure that they are where young people can find them: they must have strong coverage on social media.

But as traditional organisations strengthen their social media presence, many don’t know how to adapt to the new platform. Some assume that generating a young following on social media means being informal and chatty. Here's a case about how trying to generate an informal conversation on Twitter can backfire if you get the tone wrong:

Rather than patronizing young readers on Twitter and Facebook, the key to success can be creating an authentic voice that young readers will trust and engage with. A leader in this area is Economist:

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-07 15:37

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Newspapers from around the world are invited to participate in a new global journalism experience for youth organised by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) that results in young people interviewing entertainment stars or other public figures - and increased circulation for participating newspapers.

The "My Dream Interview" international youth reporter festival of success stories, supported by the Fundacion Acindar of Argentina, asks school teams of 11- to 15-year olds to choose a prominent person they would like to interview, then come up with the questions to ask.

The school teams submit their idea and questions to the participating newspaper, which chooses the best set of questions, helps the winning team conduct the interview, and publishes it. Newspapers can then enter the interview in a worldwide WAN-IFRA competition, with the winners presented at a ceremony at the IFRA Expo in Madrid in October.

Winning interviews will be distributed globally by The Interview People, with all royalties going to winning schools.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-20 16:03

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Young people in Viginia, USA have the opportunity to learn how to become digitally savvy students thanks to a project called Globaloria, run by the World Wide Workshop, a non-profit that develops social media and technology applications for use in education.

The project, funded in part by The Knight Foundation, aims to instruct kids in how to read and write with new media. But this is not standard literacy lesson; 'reading' new media might mean understanding how to play and navigate game structures, 'writing' new media might mean learning how to code. The scheme aims to teach young people about how media works, so they can better understand the media they consume and potentially start learning the skills that would stand them in good stead to enter the media industry in future.

The project is now in 50 schools around the state and it is now in the process of becoming a state-funded initiative as it expands and is offered to more students in more schools. Amy Starlight Lawrence, program associate at Knight Foundation said: "Globaloria showed that by enabling students to learn by creating content in the form of games, they furthered their learning goals and digital knowledge".

So maybe computer games in class aren't such a bad idea after all.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-12 19:05

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Today, the French ministry of culture and communication launched season three of 'Mon Journal Offert' ('My Free Newspaper'), an initiative established in 2009 as part of a government bailout of the press, aimed at encouraging people between the ages of 18 and 24 to read daily newspapers in print. The scheme allows any citizen of France or one of its departments, aged between 18 and 24, the chance to claim a free daily newspaper - selected from a range of 61 titles - one day a week for a year.

Young French people have a limited period of time to take advantage of this offer - the window for subscription begins on October 5 and closes December 31, after which 220,000 young people will be able to receive a free daily newspaper. Successful applicants are selected on a first come, first served basis as demand always outstrips supply; in previous years close to 400,000 applications have been made, according to the ministry of culture's website.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-05 16:22

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It is a truth universally lamented in the news industry, but no one can deny the fact that sales of printed newspapers are declining, with digital formats moving in to fill the space. If the younger generation, like their parents, begin reading news from online sources, where does that leave the future of print?

As inma.org reported, one Austrian newspaper, Kleine Zeitung, has seen this forthcoming challenge and launched a pre-emptive strike: they have launched Kleine Kinderzeitung, a newspaper specifically designed for children.

There are already some very successful models for engaging children in current affairs and news in general. Take for instance the long-running BBC institution that is Newsround. The program was first broadcast in 1972, initially known as 'John Craven's Newsround', after its longstanding presenter and editor, the show continues to be aired today.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-27 13:40

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The unparalleled recent events in Tunisia and Egypt have offered newspapers a chance to make use of their youth pages and supplements to explain a complex situation.

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) has gathered some examples from around the world.

"Newspapers, yes newspapers, are playing a leading role in providing explanatory journalism for children, who are just as interested and just as concerned about these events as their parents," said Dr Aralynn McMane, Executive Director of Young Readership Development at WAN-IFRA.
> A Luxembourg paper that put the events into the context of other anti-régime revolutions

>Stories from Lebanon about the Facebook link, the peril of burning tires and the crucial role of youth in the events.

> A Brazilian editorial page in the main paper that made sure children, too, could understand the message about why the press is vital in such a situation.

> French daily and weekly newspapers for children that expained the events and the countries to children as young as age 7.

> A Singapore paper that encouraged teachers to explore what would happen if such a protest emerged there.

> A German wire service that explained how journalists work and children live in Egypt.

For detailed descriptions of the projects please see here.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-03-03 10:41

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McSweeney's, the publishing house founded by author and editor Dave Eggers, is starting to produce a children's page for inclusion in newspapers, called The Goods. It will be distributed through Tribune Media Services and can run as a full page in a tabloid or a half page in a broadsheet.

The weekly page promises that "a cavalcade of artists and writers from the world of children's books will contribute amusements that will enthrall kids and most adults." It will develop regular features, and will hosts word or picture games, facts or dares, for example. The content might be related to current events.

Aralynn McMane, WAN-IFRA's Executive Director of Young Readership Development, commented that "It's the freshest approach to this kind of content I've seen since Diario de Navarra of Spain (a World Young Reader Prize winner) changed its pretty routine games page into a compendium of silly activities that played with the day's news and sent children back into the main paper."

The McSweeney's site encourages newspaper readers who are not getting The Goods to write to their paper and request it. As yet, the only information on where it will be carried is in the US and Canada.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-22 17:32

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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