WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 22.09.2017


World Newspaper Congress

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With those advances, however, come challenges and new ways of thinking. It is essential that editors rethink how the audience consumes content: they might start reading a story in print, continue it on their mobile as they travel, and finish it at work on a computer screen.

The new definition of news is anything you didn’t know 15 minutes ago – or even 15 seconds – says García. Many journalists lament that Twitter is where news breaks, he continued, but Twitter is just 140 characters: it is up to journalists to go deeper. 

There is still a place for print, says García, “I believe print is eternal, as long as it adapts.” Paper has the power of disconnect, he says, something that people crave on occasion in this hyper-connected age. But print publications must focus on what they do best. “Nobody expects breaking news in a paper – paper is old,” García believes: “the headlines have to be written to imply looking to the future, not ‘this has already happened.’”

The Washington Post is one paper that is sufficiently evolving in print, García says. It has reinvented its Sunday edition with surprise stories on the front, great photography, and a compact magazine. Colombia’s El Tiempo has also made significant changes, he pointed out, moving from six sections to three: what you need to know (news), what you should read (in-depth features) and what you should do (lifestyle and entertainment).

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-05 16:09

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Forget the myth of the good old days. To Mark Little, we’re living in a golden age.

Little was once a foreign correspondent tied to a satellite dish. He says what he’s seeing now from Syria, from people on the ground, is “much more authentic.”

Little embraces social media. He has a three-pronged approach: discover, validate and deliver.

But it’s not enough to rely on technology and algorithms. Little says journalists are needed to sort through the noise.

“We don’t want to replace journalists, we want to help them and empower them,” Little says.

With Storyful, Little has worked with a number of media companies, including The Economist and The New York Times. His company helps them harness the power of social media.

The key, he says, is to ensure they have content they can trust.

Little says it’s not necessary to have a technical background. But it does require a big shift in what journalists do and how they approach it.

“We’re going to have to become far more humble,” he says.

Journalists need to engage with their audience and realize they don’t own the content, he says.

Mark Little spoke at the 19th World Editors Forum in Kiev, Ukraine. For more reports from the event visit the Kiev 2012 blog.

Author

Terra Tailleur

Date

2012-09-05 15:57

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Partal was accustomed to change. But when social media came along, he needed to rethink everything, from how to approach news to how to interact with readers.

The new approach puts social media first. Partal says it’s about talking and interacting with the audience, about inviting the readers in.

For example, readers can find out what stories the staff is working on, then offer feedback. Sometimes they offer suggestions for possible interviewees.

There’s also a shop and a plan to open a café in the newsroom. Partal says people like to watch how the staff works and get to know who writes the stories.

Membership is a key strategy. There are different levels, starting at 60 euros a year.

Partal says one year later, they have 2,000 paying customers. But it’s 11 percent of the budget.

“They are not just a reader,” Partal says, describing how people feel that as members they have rights.

He says the goal is to have 5,000 people pay, which would cover 50 percent of the budget.

So Partal knows he needs to expand his reach. Google may have been the biggest driver at one point, but that’s no longer the case. He has his eye on Facebook and Twitter.

Vicent Partal spoke at the World Editors Forum in Kiev, Ukraine. For live reporting on the event, follow the Kiev 2012 blog.

Photo courtesy of gravity_grave via Flickr Creative Commons


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Author

Terra Tailleur

Date

2012-09-04 17:29

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Relations with the local community are just as important as subscriptions, Arne Bore continues. Dialogue with readers is one of the most important tasks of the paper.

A lot of the paper’s most valuable content comes from its relationship with its readers, he says, such as:

  1. Updates on community news: what’s going on, births, deaths and marriages
  2. Unique stories contributed by readers as part of crowd-sourcing efforts
  3. Enriched stories that have a "longer tail" as reader contributions allow for updates, and are higher quality when readers supply corrections

What is essential, however, when you open up a channel of communication, is to both listen and respond to readers. “If you are not responding to criticism, it will stand there unanswered,” Arne Bore warns.

It is also necessary to prevent the publication of offensive reader comments, Arne Bore says. “At the start we didn’t have the tools and resources to monitor reader participation,” he says, “and the good stuff wasn’t able to shine through.” Now, Drammens Tidende has introduced a two-tiered commenting system, whereby users must identify themselves, or their comments will be pre-moderated.

There is a fine line to be drawn, however, between filtering out the offensive and setting the bar too high, Arne Bore believes. “We don’t want to become an elitist media platform,” he stresses.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-04 16:45

Anabel Hernández, 2012 Golden Pen laureate
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Mexico is one of the most dangerous places in the world to practice journalism. Since the ravaging war on drugs began in 2006, journalists have lived with a twofold threat: from the drug cartels, who want to control the flow of information, and from the authorities, who attempt to silence journalists who might reveal the corruption and complicity of the powerful in dealing with organized crime, which has infiltrated every aspect of public life.

Thirty-nine journalists have been killed since the start of Felipe Calderón’s presidency in December 2006, including five this year, and many of the perpetrators go unpunished, as the mechanisms to resolve cases are ineffective. A further ten have been forced into exile. However, this does not mean that those journalists who remain have all lost the determination to do their jobs.

“We don’t want to just be part of a death toll: we want to keep working and keep living, to keep Mexican journalism alive,” says investigative journalist Anabel Hernández, who was driven to investigative work following the kidnapping and murder of her father in Mexico City in 2000. “I am scared for my life and for my children, but one of my greatest concerns is to lose the ability to do journalism, because if I couldn’t do journalism it would be another way to die.”

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-03 10:46

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Forbes media writer Dirk Smillie has questioned the decision of World Editors Forum director Bertrand Pecquerie to invite Hezbollah MP Hassan Fadlallah to a lunch at the WEF event to be held in Beirut, Lebanon in June. Pecquerie's response appears below Smilie's posting.

For more information about the 17th World Editors Forum and the 63rd World Newspaper Congress, please see www.wanlebanon2010.com.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-16 12:39

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Is investigative journalism giving up on newspapers? "No!," stressed Aroon Purie, the founding chairman and editor-in-chief of the India Today Group.

Purie, a well known journalist in India, spoke earlier this afternoon on a panel discussing the abandonment of investigative journalism in newspapers.

"You need smart Journalists, determined journalists, people who have a passion for this," Purie explained.

Purie told the listeners that as an investigative journalist, your best tool is a reputation, something he calls "green-house journalism," or the planting of stories. "I find if you build a reputation, more people give you stories and tips," Purie went on saying. "In today's environment, its a matter of survival."

Later, in reference to an earlier post, Purie told the forum that he suspects that in the future, news will be a commodity and that newspapers will be entirely premium content. "It's going to be content that the readers don't know and can't find anywhere else," he expressed.

It's this premium content that gives Purie his optimistic outlook for investigative journalism in newspapers.

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Author

Daniel Dressler

Date

2009-12-03 11:13

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According to former UK Journalist of the Year, Reporter of the Year, and Feature Writer of the Year, Nick Davies, all journalism is investigative.

Davies spoke about his views on investigative journalism during the WAN-IFRA 2009 World Newspaper Congress .

He was critical, however, of celebrity news and similar genres, saying "this isn't journalism, it's constitutionally free, but it's garbage."

According to Davies, if you come across a journalist that says he is an investigative journalist, you have someone with a personality problem; because that's like saying the water in a bottle is wet.

"All journalism is investigative, because it is, or should be, an attempt to uncover the truth," said Davies, who recently carried out the Guardian's investigation into the News Corp phone-hacking scandal.

He thought long-term journalism was a better way to describe the kind of indepth projects that are usually described as investigative. usually occurs because someone is deliberately trying to construct information reporters need.

However, there is a threat to this so called investigative journalism, he said. That threat is commercialism. Commercial pressure that has come piling down on publications is taking time away from reporting.

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Author

Spencer Jenkins

Date

2009-12-03 10:59

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"Absolutely essential" is how Tony Joseph, CEO and co-founder of Mindworks Global Media describes the need for editorial outsourcing.

Joseph, who spoke today during the first session of the World Editors Forum, illustrated the necessity for outsourcing and described its ability to alter cost-structure. Joseph believes outsourcing can lower costs while still maintaining the "core proposition."

"Up to 75 percent of a news desk's regular daily editing can be outsourced, in our experience" Joesph says. The 25% that remains in house is selecting stories, re-writing, and choosing where they go. "To significantly alter core-structure, outsourcing is key," Joseph stressed.

Joseph also explained the "three-ring-structure" strategy, a system already in use, that he believes can "do more with less": the topic of this year's forum. The structure consists of three layers that make up the newspaper staff.

The innermost ring of the system contains the in-house staff of editors and reporters. The second ring consists of the outsourcing team; copy editors, design team, and page layout. The outer ring is comprised of the community, who can contribute observations and updates from their local areas.

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Author

Daniel Dressler

Date

2009-12-03 05:59

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Olivier Creiche, CEO for Six Apart, a company that provides low cost, easy-to-use media platforms such as Movable Type, spoke this afternoon during the second session of the World Editors Forum.

Creiche discussed the possibility of relationships between new online media groups and existing publishers."There is competition, all fighting for the same advertising dollars, but I would hope you think competition is necessary for creativity." Creiche went on to add that a collaboration of the two is possible and acquisition can be cheap. "The tough part is buying the chicken without killing it." he explained.

Creiche also discussed the success factors of these groups. Net Media Europe, a company that specializes in online IT news, had success in their first year. Creiche attributes the success to these key factors: using experienced professionals, having a low tech cost [the company is online only], using existing brands, and having a community focus. Creiche later added that being financially backed will save the company, which was un-profitable in 2009.

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Author

Daniel Dressler

Date

2009-12-02 11:47

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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