WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 26.11.2014


WikiLeaks

‘The N.Y. Times is the paper of record that published and stood behind the Pentagon Papers. Where are you now on the brutal prison treatment and studied legalities being visited on US Army Private Bradley Manning? […] It’s unconscionable and sad if The Times sits quietly by saying nothing.’

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-12-06 19:07

For some former supporters, WikiLeaks pinned the scarlet 'H' of hypocrisy to its gown when founder Julian Assange turned to press freedom foe Rafael Correa of Ecuador for political asylum.

This week, WikiLeaks further alienated some of its allies – including underground hacking collective Anonymous – when the freedom-of-information advocate erected a pop-up window, which many news organisations have described as a ‘paywall’ but it prefers to call a 'blockade,' in the path of visitors to its site.

On the same evening that WikiLeaks uploaded its newest trove of leaked ‘Global Intelligence Files’ regarding the U.S. presidential elections, users visiting the site began bumping into a page illustrated with a wallet and credit cards, and bearing the headline, “In this election, vote with your wallet: Vote WikiLeaks.” To get past the pop-up, users were asked to either share the embedded video on Facebook or Twitter, or to make a donation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-12 15:33

Do newspapers speak to your condition? If so, you might be interested in a print edition of the Lancashire Evening Post that plays audio. Developed as part of a research project by the University of Central Lancashire, "Interactive Newsprint" will be demostrated at the London Design Festival next week, Journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall reports.

“A new study has suggested that the most read newspaper in the UK - the Sun - is also the least trusted,” writes Andrew Pugh for Press Gazette. In the least read and most trusted category? The Independent, the Guardian, and the Financial Times.

Press Gazette also reports that Archant has launched a new 68-page glossy magazine called Fulham Resident that is being distributed to 13,500 homes.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-13 17:08

In written a statement to British Parliament, the United Kingdom’s Foreign Secretary William Hague has dismissed Julian Assange’s fears that, if extradited to Sweden he might be sent on to the United States to face the death penalty.

"The suggestion that Mr Assange's human rights would be put at risk by the possibility of onward extradition from Sweden to a third country is…without foundation. Not only would Sweden – as a signatory to the European convention on human rights – be required to refuse extradition in circumstances which would breach his human rights, but the authorities in Sweden would also be legally obliged to seek the United Kingdom's consent before any extradition to a non-EU member state could proceed,” said Hague in the statement.

“The United Kingdom could only consent to Mr. Assange’s onward extradition from Sweden to a third country if satisfied that extradition would be compatible with his human rights, and that there was no prospect of a death sentence being imposed or carried out.”

The death penalty is currently legal in 33 of America’s 50 states, as well as in the military.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-03 18:00

Julian Assange has applied for political asylum at the Ecuadorian embassy in London – a refuge that has been called an “ironic” choice for the whistleblower, given Ecuador’s poor press freedom record, and its president’s open contempt for the non-state media.

Ecuador’s administration “appears to have a warm relationship with Mr. Assange,” and has agreed to consider the application, according to The New York Times. The WikiLeaks founder will remain at the country's embassy in Knightsbridge, where he arrived in person Tuesday evening, until authorities have reached a decision, reported Wired.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-20 13:36

The lawyer representing Bradley Manning, the 24-year-old US soldier accused of having leaked a massive trove of classified documents to WikiLeaks, has said that his trial is being endangered by the US government’s lack of transparency and by failures on the part of the prosecution.

The Courthouse News Service reported yesterday that Manning’s attorney David Coombs has condemned "a cataclysmic failing of the government to understand all aspects of the discovery process."

According to the article, Coombs has complained of the prosecution first refusing to share certain evidence with the defence on the grounds that it was classified, only to reverse its statements within a matter of days. Coombs has also implied that government prosecutors have made mistakes with the legal process, and have failed demonstrated full knowledge of their legal obligations.

The Courthouse News Service reports that in Coomb’s memo “nearly every line of text quoting a government memo or email has been blacked out in redactions”. The article points out that the information that has been withheld reflects “the intense secrecy surrounding the case”.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-25 10:37

WikiLeaks' latest leak, which is calls 'The Global Intelligence Files' is not as yet particularly interesting because of the content of the files, but because of the fact that WikiLeaks is back, and because of the partnerships that the episode reveals.

WikiLeaks claims to have created an online database of more than five million emails from Stratfor, a global intelligence company based in Austin, Texas, sent between July 2004 and December 2011. Stratfor provides its subscribers with geopolitical analysis via emails and explains on its site how it differentiates itself from news organisations.

A WikiLeaks press release claims that the emails show "Stratfor's web of informers, pay-off structure, payment-laundering techniques and psychological methods" and that the company "cultivates close ties with US government agencies and employs former US government staff."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-28 17:35

"Everybody is a journalist now".

This phrase has been repeated so many times that it's become a cliché, but that's not to say that a consensus has been reached about what it really means for the news industry. How should news organisations approach material from citizen journalists? Should lines be drawn between professional and citizen media? How can the work of citizen journalists be effectively verified?

These were some of the questions raised at the session titled "Professional and "Citizen" Journalism Working Together after WikiLeaks" at the UNESCO conference on The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, where several panellists suggested that collaboration between citizen and professional reporters was best model.

The benefits for news organisations using citizen reporting were highlighted by Riyaad Minty, Head of Social Media for Al Jazeera. Often, he said, citizen reporters can send in stories from areas that professional journalists have difficulty accessing, such as Syria, and can report on things that large news outlets fail to cover.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 16:19

How have government-media relations changed after the arrival of WikiLeaks and the scandal at the News of the World, wondered panellists at a WPFC and UNESCO-organised conference in Paris last week, The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World.

Henrikas Yushkiavitshus, the former UNESCO Assistant Director General for Communication and Information and former Vice-Chairman of Gostel Radio in Moscow, opened the session on government-media relations by reminding the audience that the relationship between media and goverments has always been fraught, since well before the birth of Wikileaks as a phenomenon. Governments, he said in his opening remarks, will not always cooperate with the media. The situation is complicated by the public perception of the media, which cannot be counted on to be favourable. Indeed in the United States, public trust in the media stood at 46% in 2008, 2 points below public trust in the government, and that figure continued to drop over the following two years.

Author

William Granger's picture

William Granger

Date

2012-02-20 11:29

By William Granger

The Wikileaks phenomenon encapsulates several issues and challenges faced by mainstream media, said Heather Brooke in her keynote speech opening the two-day conference on the future of journalism after WikiLeaks and The News of the World, organised by the World Press Freedom Committee and UNESCO.

Wikileaks is the direct descendent of a decades-old desire for a space in which citizens can access data free from government control, and although the organisation itself may have lost favour with the public, it represents a new freedom of information which runs counter to government attempts to control that information, said Brooke. The media, she argued, must use this as an opportunity for better professional reporting.

Since the 1970s, Brooke argued, science fiction writers have imagined a world in which their protagonists travelled to 'data-havens' to escape from government surveillance and censorship. So-called 'cyberpunk' novels were written before such havens became a reality and it was only in the 1990s that these, the forerunners to Wikileaks, came into being.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-20 10:32

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation