WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


Washington Post

WaPo Executive Editor Marty Baron’s assurance to Poynter that “some posts can be as short as a sentence or as simple as a link” did not silence the Twittersphere’s response:  “At least WaPo is being open with its intention to kill someone,” Kissing Suzy Kolber blog editor Mike Tunison tweetedDerek Thompson, senior editor of The Atlanticwrote, “nobody has 12 smart things to say a day, it’s an absurd ask!”

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-21 18:15

The paywall, set to take effect this summer, will allow each visitor 20 complementary page views per month, excluding the home page and classifieds section. The newspaper hopes to maintain most of its 17 million monthly unique visitors.

Such a metered model has proven successful for other newspapers including The New York Times, which Columbia Journalism Review said generates $100 million through digital subscriptions.

In addition to not counting clicks from search engines and social media, the paywall will allow unlimited access from schools, government and military workplaces, notable as more than 20 percent of District of Columbia residents are federal employees, according to Forbes. But Don Graham, chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Co., has previously noted that locals provide less than 10 percent of the newspaper’s online traffic. This statistic made him previously wary of charging for online access, as he predicted that bundling digital subscriptions with print wouldn’t be as successful for The Post as for other papers.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-19 14:21

“It’s pretty shocking to see what’s become of the time-honored form since the newspaper industry’s great unraveling started a decade ago,” Starkman wrote.

The industry saw a steady rise of long-form contextual journalism from the 1950s to the early 2000s, according to a new report by Katherine Fink and Michael Schudson of Columbia University. But Starkman’s research suggests that such in-depth coverage might have peaked about a decade ago.

Starkman examined The L.A. Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times and reported that all but The New York Times saw steep declines in their long-form coverage. The Post’s 2,000 word stories dropped about 50 percent between 2003 and 2012, and The Journal’s fell 35 percent. These declines are even sharper for 3,000 word stories: The L.A. Times saw a 90 percent decrease and The Journal a 70 percent decrease.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-15 16:57

Eventually all publishers “will have no choice” but to try sponsored content, considering plummeting ad sales, paidContent noted. Newspaper advertising revenues fell over 9 percent in 2011, according to statistics from Newspaper Association of America. And, as Derek Thompson of The Atlantic wrote, “the vast majority of quality journalism has always relied, and probably will always rely, on advertising to be both high-quality and affordable to a massive audience.”

So from that perspective it’s good news that BrandConnect seems to have drawn on the merits and mistakes from other pioneers in advertorials such as BuzzFeed and The Atlantic, and hopefully the new system, too, will provide feedback that will help publishers create their own best practice models.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-05 18:26

This U.S. presidential election season, The Washington Post, NPR and the Sunlight Foundation are inviting developers to delve into their APIs* and show off some of the wild things they can do with data during a weekend-long Election Hackathon.

The challenge is open to any developer who lives in the United States and will be in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. from October 6-7, 2012. Participants are expected to build unique web or mobile applications that illuminate aspects of the presidential race using data from The Washington Post’s newly available APIs, as well as those of NPR, the Sunlight Foundation (a transparency non-profit) and any other sources they can find.

The free hackathon will apparently include six meals and 26 hours of frenzied app building, which can be undertaken either solitarily or in a team of up to five people. Programmers are welcome to explore the APIs in advance, but cannot start on their apps until after registration and bagels on Saturday morning. 

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-08-29 14:48

“Investigative reporting became sexy after Watergate,” wrote Alicia Shepard, media consultant for the News Literacy Project, in The New York Times’ Room for Debate forum on the lasting effects of the scandal, published yesterday.

The tenacious pursuit of a story by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein ultimately played an integral part in driving President Richard Nixon out of the White House, and this "sexy" triumph of truth over power, further romanticized in the book and movie that followed (“All the President’s Men”) prompted a “sharp rise in investigative reporting,” wrote Sheperd.

This included the opening of a number of investigative units by newspapers and television stations, and the founding in 1975 – the year after Nixon resigned – of the Investigative Reporters & Editors group (IRE), a nonprofit organization whose mission is “to foster excellence in investigative journalism, which is essential to a free society.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-14 18:58

[View the story "Watergate at 40: the digital footprint of a scandal" on Storify]

To explore the digital storytelling that surrounds Watergate forty years after the scandal broke, we used Storify, an online curation tool that lets users pull together articles, videos, images and social media posts from across the web, link them with snippets of text, and format them into a embeddable, graphic narrative.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-12 15:37

The Washington Post has started to produce a daily minute-long video compiling latest news headlines, that it posts on its homepage on weekdays at noon. Called '59 Seconds,' the segments include coverage of "politics, policies, sports, personalities in Washington and more," the paper says on its website.

The video show is presented by Ylan Mui, a staff writer at Wash Post who writes about consumers at the economy, and the segment is a mix of Mui speaking directly to the camera from the paper's newsroom, and a mashup of videos and photos. Currently, the videos begin with a 15-second pre-roll ad from Conoco Phillips, the launch sponsor.

"Our goal is to give readers a snapshot of news that reflects Post coverage in a way that's easy to digest and available at the same time everyday," said Andrew Pergam, director of video for The Post. "This is the first of more video products in the pipeline focused on reaching people in ways that are unique to The Post and the region."

The Washington Post already offers a video section of its website featuring the latest videos from WaPo journalists.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-05 15:56

Engage. Listen to your readers. Build a community.

All good advice coming in newspapers' direction. But when it comes to responding to comments on their websites, disappointingly few are putting it into practice.

The Washington Post is one of the exceptions. Nieman Lab recently reported that the paper is encouraging its reporters to take part in the conversation on its website. In addition to the six people dedicated to comments full-time, over 40 reporters have contributed to the comment threads over recent weeks, Joe DeNunzio, the Post's interactivity editor, wrote in a blog post.

"The interactivity team here started taking a more active approach to getting reporters into the comments late last year because we were pretty sure it could help the comment threads - and the journalism," DeNunzio told Nieman. Based on the evidence so far, it appears that this is exactly what has happened.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2012-02-10 16:55

On 8 February, the same day that The Washington Post announced its fifth round of voluntary redundancies in the past several years, the Forbes website posted a long profile of Washington Post Chairman and CEO Donald E. Graham by Jeff Bercovici titled "Nice Guy, Finishing Last: How Don Graham Fumbled the Washington Post Co." that highlights a number of challenges and setbacks the company has suffered in recent years.

Among these are missed opportunities with Facebook and Politico, as well as major losses sustained from Newsweek (reportedly $40 million in the two years before the company sold it) and recent problems relating to its Kaplan education unit.

As all of these areas have suffered, so has the company's best known product, its namesake newspaper, which has seen circulation fall by 40% since 1995 (to just over 500,000).

Forbes quotes analyst Ken Doctor as saying that in the most recent quarter, the Post had "the worst performance of any of the public newspaper companies", in the US. Things are even off on the digital side, where "digital ad revenue, rather than rising to offset the inevitable loss of print sales, actually fell 14% in the most recent quarter", Bercovici writes.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-02-09 19:39

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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