WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sat - 20.12.2014


war reporting

UPDATE: This article has been updated on November 16 at 12:16 pm.

Welcome to the new age of cyberwarfare, in which armies liveblog deadly attacks, and even provide infographics. Twitter, YouTube, Flickr and Facebook are among the weapons being mobilized by the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) in their campaign against Hamas and other militant groups, launched yesterday.

The IDF are using the verified Twitter account @IDFSpokesperson and the hashtags #IsraelUnderFire and #PillarOfDefense to communicate messages such as the “elimination” of Hamas military leader Ahmed Jabari, the alleged number of rockets that have been fired at Israel from Gaza since the start of the strike, and claims regarding efforts to “minimize harm to Palestinian civilians.”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-15 17:14

Being a war correspondent is a dangerous job. Yet that doesn't deter avid young journalists, eager for experience, from going out to conflict zones armed with an iPhone and not much else and trying to report on conflicts.

This has been a particularly bloody 12 months for journalists, with even experienced photojournalists such as Tim Heatherington and Chris Hondros killed in Misurata. Heatherington was quoted expressing concern about the number of young and untrained photographers covering the conflict in Libya this year.

This is where WARCO comes into play. WARCO is a gamed devised by Tom Maniaty, a senior lecturer in international journalism at the University of Technology Sydney and a former producer at the Australian Broadcasting Company. It is designed to simulate combat environments so that young journalists can at least have a glimpse into the work of a journalist in a conflict zone.

The game has similar format to any first person shooter, except instead of returning fire when attacked, the player can only raise a camera and attempt to shoot video. The clips the player records are then saved and then can be edited into news footage ready to be aired. The player is then assessed on whether their strategy needs improvement.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-17 18:55

On Wed 16 March the Guardian journalist Ghaith Abdul-Ahad, detained by the Lybian authorities for a fortnight, was finally released. He was picked up in the coastal town of Sabratha on 2 March, along with Andrei Netto, a correspondent for the Brazilian newspaper O Estado de S Paulo.

Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger revealed to Press Gazette his role in the negotiation, giving credit to Turkey for helping facilitate the release and to Libya for letting them leave the country.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-22 16:27

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