WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 28.11.2014


videojournalism

"Thank God we've moved away from the time when you think you can just put television online," said David Hayward, head of the journalism programme at the BBC College of Journalism, opening a session on online video at news:rewired in London on Friday.

John Domokos, video producer at the Guardian, elaborated on this sentiment, explaining that a newspaper can't hope to beat TV for the polished version of a story, thoroughly edited with a highly-structured narrative, so it is better to focus on what it can do that is different and complementary. He often adopts a "microcosm" approach, aiming to create a three or four minute film that gives viewers a window onto a specific world.

This works particularly well with stories that focus on a community, he explained, such as the Birmingham riots in the UK last summer. It's easier to gain the community's trust if you are just one man with a camera, rather than a whole TV crew, he said, and if you can get close to the characters you don't need too much movement and visual drama to create something compelling.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-06 17:46

The Wall Street Journal has launched 'WSJ Live', an app that will greatly expand The Wall Street Journal Digital Network.

The WSJDN previously streamed around 4 hours of daily live programming on the WSJ website; but with the advent of this app the network is taking a leap forward, as its content can now be accessed onthe iPad, on the cross platform home theatre PC system Boxee and also via a range of internet TVs from manufacturers such as Sony, Samsung and Panasonic. Additional distribution channels will be added in the coming weeks, including Google TV, Hulu and the Hulu Plus subscription service, Roku, a press release said.

"This is the latest evolution of our 'Journal Everywhere' strategy, an initiative that is particularly original because of the innovative advertising opportunities we're opening up across so many new distribution platforms," said Alisa Bowen, general manager of The Wall Street Journal Digital Network, in a press release detailing the motives behind the video app launch.

The advertising opportunities specified in the release are pre-roll and mid-roll ads of 15 or 30 seconds. As well as increased advertising opportunities, the purpose of the launch is clearly to increase exposure of WSJ journalism.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-09-14 13:32

Radio used to be the most immediate method of accessing news information and to many it remains an indispensable means of obtaining news. But how can radio maintain its position as a valuable and relevant medium when digital media offer effective, instantaneous methods of communicating using a combination of text, video and audio?

The answer, many would argue, is 'visualisation'. Essentially, this is a process of filming what is actually happening in a studio and broadcasting it via the web. Why do this? What is the difference between visualisation and television?

However, the effect that visualisation achieves is quite different, as explained on the BBC College of Journalism Blog. Visualisation shows the radio studio as a working environment, where interviews are held, where music is performed and where news is reported. It is very much unlike watching interview or performances in the highly engineered context of a pre-recorded television show, for instance. The attraction with visualisation is occupying the privileged position of 'fly on the wall', seeing the internal workings of a radio studio, which traditionally remains closed to the eyes of the public.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-19 17:30

Could video be a solution for increasing web traffic? Apparently so, according to Poynter, which cites The Miami Herald as the example for how a newspaper can use digital video to the advantage of driving web traffic, which in turn drives viewers to the paper's website, which in turn could lead to generating more revenue. Last year The Herald saw a 25-percent increase in video traffic, second to traffic behind articles.

Video may seem tangential to newspapers, but in the Internet age it is a solution to getting the public's attention and interest as long as the videos are short and direct. This is preferable since not long ago, "some news organizations were beginning to give up on online video. It required significant resources, and it wasn't generating as much revenue or traffic as they had hoped," writes Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore. But news organizations that have stuck with video "have found that video provides them with a way to advance what they're already doing well, increase time on site, and engage users in ways that traditional narratives can't."

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-03 11:05

According to Journalism.co.uk, a new video service will be launched for journalists, broadcasters and web editors, giving them free access to promotional videos.

The Video News Agency is a site that offers videos to journalists, which they can use in their articles or to gain additional information on what they are working on. The agency provides content such as corporate announcements, documentary material and interview footage. The site also gives Electronic Press Kit materials to broadcast journalists.

"VNA offers the world's media access to the rapidly growing wealth of high quality news and feature footage that is increasingly being self-produced by businesses, NGOs and government," said operations director Daniel Kennedy in a release.

Journalists can now view at the latest media online without discs, ftp codes or embed codes.

"It has also been designed to meet the media's need for quick and simple access to searchable and relevant content that is of a high enough editorial standard to upload or broadcast on their own channels," Kennedy continued.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-15 11:41

The launch of the "first comprehensive guide for all live and scheduled events" on the Internet was announced in a press release today. Live Matrix will be available for publishers, event organisers and individuals as a service that covers live audio and video webcasts, product launches, site launches as well as other Web-based announcements.

Live Matrix organises video content according to genre (i.e. entertainment, news or sports). CNet explained that each event has a box that measures how many users have saved it to their listings so that the event gets a popularity rating of sorts. Users may also schedule reminders or share the event across their social networks. The online TV-guide does not host any of the content, but offers links to outside sites. The outlet sells advertising space and embarks on sponsorship ventures with event providers, according to Venture Beat.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-14 11:24

The importance of context and the disadvantages of hasty publishing immediately jump to mind when considering the journalistic implications of the political fiasco stemming from the Shirley Sherrod videoclips.

Shirley Sherrod, former Georgia Director of Rural Development for the USDA (US Department of Agriculture) was made to resign after a two-minute video of her admitting to doing 'just enough' for a white farmer, hit the waves. The video which can be traced back to Andrew Breitbart of Big Government, turned out to be an edited clip that attains a different meaning when viewed unabridged and the situation became more embarrassing when Brietbart admitted during an interview with TPMMuckraker that he did not have the full video (meaning the edited version was his sole source).

In an interview with Shepard Smith of Fox News' Studio B, contributor Juan Williams declared that the debacle is an example of how nobody "is exercising any kind of editorial judgment."

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-07-23 13:17

Video blogging, quite simply a blog which employs video as its medium, is a phenomenon which hasn't shown the same success as its text-based parent amongst everyday web users. Despite the fact the 'tools of the trade' - cameras, editing software, and a platform to broadcast - are no longer unaffordable or complex obstacles, the significant investment of time to produce something that is of a publishable quality is still a drawback for many.

Author

Jennifer Lush

Date

2009-10-12 12:12

Beamups, the digital marketplace for news footage goes live today with a UK version of the site.

The invention of two former cameramen, Boaz Eshtai and Yosi Romano, Beamups offers a platform for producers to distribute and sell their previously unused and archived material to would-be buyers.

The website first launched in the Middle East in April and, since then, has already helped to secure deals with the BBC, Al Jazeera, ABC and Rtvi.

Speaking with the Guardian's digital publishing correspondent, Jemima Kiss, a company spokeswoman said the site is intended as a business-to-business venture, although they have not ruled out the possibility of adding some amateur content. In any case, the company does not plan to operate in the same way as newswire service Demotix, which promotes the work of citizen journalists.

Every item sold on Beamups represents a 40% commission fee for the company - a typical figure within the industry, particularly for a B2B provider - and the seller gets to dictate the price. Buyers can choose from a variety of material and can opt to purchase footage outright or use it as a one-off. Like eBay, vendors set up their own "window" and, once a sale has been made, shoppers are invited to rate the service and quality of the content.

Author

Soraya Kishtwari

Date

2009-05-28 12:03

The Financial Times is investing in its online multimedia content by building two new studios, where FT.com journalists can produce both video and audio reporting for the site. According to Media Week, the video channel will make "full use of the opportunities video offers", including global analysis and interviews, whilst the audio studio will be used for podcasts and round table discussions.

Users who are not subscribed to FT.com will be charged to use the video service, if they access it more than 10 times per month. The decision to build the two studios displays the importance that the FT attributes to multimedia content on its sites, and indicates the ever changing and evolving nature of news reporting.

Source: Media Week

Author

Helena Deards

Date

2009-05-20 18:15

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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