WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 29.08.2014


video

A video sharing service on Flickr, Yahoo's online photo sharing site, will reportedly launch in the beginning of April.

Flickr has discussed adding video for a while, but nothing has come of it until now, reports TechCrunch. The delay in launching video sharing may have been the result of internal debates over how to make Flickr video distinct from YouTube.

According to Techno!, the new video service will not replace Yahoo Video, unlike Flickr's photo sharing service, which canceled out Yahoo Photos.

Flickr also added a photo mapping feature last year.

Sources: TechCrunch through HowardOwens.com, Techno! (in french)

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-03-18 07:56

Should journalists specialize in one particular news format or do they have timeto undertake other forms of multimedia to complement their stories? Mercury News' Lisa Fernandez recently made a video for her story about a toddler who died in a pond, simply by shooting the pond from different angles and adding the sound of running water when piecing the shots together.

"Didn't take me more than a few minutes" to shoot the video, Fernandez writes in the News Videographer blog. "I needed to look at the area anyway, to describe in words, for my story."

For longer features, Fernandez tells her editor in advance so she can have an extra day to make the video. She can make a 2 minute video in an hour or two.

Making multimedia complements doesn't need to rival documentaries. Journalists can add deeper understanding to a story by spending only a few minutes with minimal equipment.

Source: SPJ

Author

Carolyn Lo

Date

2008-03-17 17:36

Hulu.com, a website created by NBC Universal and Fox that legally hosts TV shows and feature films, launches to the public tomorrow. It is predicted to rival other video sharing websites, especially Google's YouTube. The difference with Hulu, reportedly, is its user-friendliness and professional quality material.

Warner Brothers, Sony Pictures, MGM, and other big name media companies have already signed on to add content onto the libraries. According to the New York Times, the only major non-participants are ABC and CBS. Additionally, sports fans will be able to find highlights from N.B.A. and N.H.L. games as well as full length N.C.A.A. men's basketball games from the past 25 years.

Viewers will be given a choice, depending on the show, with which commercials they want to see. Some viewers will even have the opportunity to watch a 2 minute film before the show which eliminates all commercials for the rest of the show.

Author

Carolyn Lo

Date

2008-03-11 17:07

Why is the content for online journalism different than print or broadcast? And why are journalists confused about what work should be entered in which contest?

The assumption that text, photos and videos are merely the "same content" online as they are in print is part of the mindset that has helped cripple U.S. paper's online efforts. The change in thinking has been considerable in recent years, but these paradigms still surface in the award season.

The monopoly on information is no longer ours alone. The business models for monopolistic control over distribution and eyeballs is busted, too. That much we can agree on now.

Still we see comments from photographers that somehow wished that online worked like a medium they know already.

But why are we segregating what we do for print versus what we do with the Internet? Why isn't the BOP (Best of Photojournalism) Web video judged against/with video produced for TV? Aren't they the same product?
- Will Seberger"> posted on Wired Journalists
This thinking is understandable, but unproductive. No, Web video is a different media experience in a different environment, completely. We can succeed first by serving small screens with sticky content than reproducing a cinema-experience for one-time consumption.

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-03-10 13:05

The Sydney Morning Herald's new video production studio is up and running. The studio is part of their integrated newsroom located in the new Fairfax Media headquarters.

Ian Vaile, director of Fairfax Digital Productions, described it as "a powerful and flexible high-definition studio, using the most cost-effective, modern equipment, including a revolutionary software-based video-switching and production system."

Vale said the studio was designed for "fast-turnaround segments." The automation within the studio means set designers can return to pre-programmed equipment settings "at the press of a couple of buttons."

"This will dramatically speed up production and make it easier to use," Vale said.

The studio contains an edit suite, centralizing all stages of video production on the news floor. A presentation desk will be set up shortly close to the news-editing hub.

A larger video studio at Fairfax Media's headquarters is also nearing completion.

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-03-07 15:16

Blogger Paul Bradshaw has identified ten keys trends in journalism in the past decade.

For Bradshaw, the biggest change has been the increased involvement of the audience, which has morphed from the occasional letter into "something else entirely." New technology also has made communication between reader and media easier than ever before.

Another contributing factor to reader involvement is what Bradshaw terms "the rise of the amateur." The spread of affordable video cameras and camera-equipped mobile phones, coupled with online viral distribution, has put readers in a position to generate news. Media outlets have since realized the value of "user-generated content."

The new focus on both "international" and "hyperlocal" markets has had an impact as well. Case in point: the Guardian US based readership is now on par with that of the New York Times. Conversly, Trinity Mirror's Teesside Gazette has launched news services geared towards individual postcodes. Services like Adrian Holovaty's Everyblock have also gotten in on the local craze.

Author

Kelley Vendeland

Date

2008-03-07 12:13

Live video streaming if the future of newspapers videos online, according to Charles de Vroede, deputy chief editor of Dutch newspaper de Telegraaf.

"I believe the future is in live streaming - for me live streaming is the missing link between newsgathering and newswriting."

De Vroede's comments come just after YouTube announced it would be implementing live video streaming within the end of the year.

According to him, other video formats lack immediacy. De Telegraaf staff is already using cameras with live streaming capability, in order to cover entertainment news stories.

"News videos online quickly become very old. For a newspaper in print that's not a problem, because everything is a day old. Being on the web as a newspaper means instantaneous news and this will happen for video," said de Vroede.

Baz Broekhuizen, editor of Volkskrant TV (competitor to de Telegraaf), disagreed with de Vroede. At this point, live video news is too expensive for newspaper sites to produce, and they produce little or no long-tail effect.

According to Broekhuizen, newspaper videos shouldn't aim to compete with television broadcasters. It should instead focus on video formats that have a longer-term appeal than breaking news items.

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-03-05 10:41

According to co-founder Steve Chen, YouTube will be adding live video content before the end of this year.

"Live video is just something that we've always wanted to do, we've never had the resources to do it correctly, but now with Google, we hope to actually do it this year," he said in an interview with Pop17 blogger Sarah Meyers.

As online video continues to boom and high-speed broadband connections spread, live online video will be one of the next steps. Up to newspapers to be at the forefront.

View the video interview here.

Source: NewTeeVee through I Want Media

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-03-03 11:37

Le Parisien draws one million viewers in 24 hours with Sarkozy video: grasping the YouTube effect

A video of the outburst of French President Nicolas Sarkozy against a journalist, shot by a journalist from Le Parisien, has drawn over a million viewers in 24 hours.

Sarkozy's outburst occurred at the annual farm fair in Paris on Saturday, after he offered his hand to a man who said: “Don't touch me, you are soiling me." Sarkozy replied: "Get lost, dumb ass."

The video was posted on Le Parisien's website and by midday Sunday 350,000 people had already viewed it. By 10:30pm on Sunday, more than one million people had viewed Sarkozy's video.

It seems the power of online buzz is just as effective when it comes to news items. The success of Le Parisien's video should prompt newspapers to equip journalists with video cameras and illustrates the highly viral nature of such video content.

Source: Le Parisien (link in French) - Reuters

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-02-25 12:34

Hearst magazines Marie Claire, Seventeen and Good Housekeeping have all three launched YouTube-branded channels, and more are on the way.

Heart Magazines Digital Media and YouTube have made a deal for 15 Hearst print and online publications to provide content online, contests, and allow viewers to upload personal videos.

Readers will be able to view on YouTube video content from the publications.

Any newspapers to follow the lead?

Source: WWD.com through I Want Media

Author

Jean Yves Chainon

Date

2008-02-21 11:15

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