WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 25.07.2014


Twitter for journalists

So what might we identify as the motivations behind creating a media expert role? For one, this announcement comes in the wake of Twitter’s appointment of Simon Rogers as its new data editor (see previous Editors Weblog article) - a move that signalled the social network site’s clear intention to increase its potential as a force of serious journalism, having somebody sift through their sea of tweets in order to fish out compelling news-worthy stories. Twitter already has a prominent media expert in its midst: Erica Anderson, who made it into Forbes’ "30 under 30" media list, appointed in February 2011 to "specialize in helping news organizations and journalists use Twitter effectively to find sources, develop comprehensive stories and engage audiences in meaningful civic discussions." Anderson already set up 'Twitter for Newsrooms' in 2011, an online toolkit designed to help journalists use Twitter for "finding sources, verifying facts, publishing stories, [and] promoting [their] work and [themselves]," already a significant step in fostering a relationship between Twitter and the media.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-05-02 17:55

Did you know that only 29 percent of Lady Gaga’s 30 million followers on Twitter actually exist? Let me just repeat that: 29 percent. That’s less than a third. The overwhelming majority are unreal, inert, mere cyphers shackled together in a collective expression of inanimate inanity. Isn’t that extraordinary?

Well, no, actually. Earlier this year, StatusPeople introduced a web tool called the Fake Follower Check that claims to ascertain how many fake followers you and your friends have. Lady Gaga, it turns out, is far from unusual: a writer at Forbes used the application to determine that 70 percent of Justin Bieber's 27 million followers are fake, as are 88 percent of Britney Spears', and 74 percent of Oprah Winfrey's.

Now, clearly, there are many plausible explanations why an account might be ‘fake’. Vast quantities of automated spam permeate the site’s chasmic recesses, and many once-genuine profiles are simply inactive. Recently, however, a more insidious manifestation of this fakery has come to light: namely, the phenomenon of ‘followers for sale’.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-22 19:11

‘No man is an island, entire of itself’, wrote the poet Donne, a sentiment which, albeit in a more prosaic form, might be said to encapsulate the social media policy of most American news corporations in the run-up to tomorrow’s Presidential election. Never before has the coverage of polling day itself, let alone the result, been so hotly anticipated, and many of the larger news organizations have attempted to codify in advance their social media strategy for the big day – chief amongst which seems to be the guiding principle that, in the words of the Associated Press, ‘people view all of us as speaking for the AP’. In their online presence on Twitter and Facebook, therefore, journalists must locate a delicate balance between their dual roles as individual and representative, as both personality and employee. Whilst social media so often acts as the shot of adrenaline reviving the groggy and often lifeless body politic, such a fusion of individuality with a larger collaborative responsibility is nonetheless fraught with danger for professional journalists.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-11-05 19:12

Pubblico, the independent Italian newspaper that launched on Tuesday, is off to a flying start. According to news website Lettera 43, the paper sold 50,000 copies of its first issue. Pubblico’s founder, journalist Luca Telese, has hailed this initial success as a victory over sceptics who thought a print-based venture was destined for failure.

On Poynter, journalism educator Kelly Fincham offers advice on "What every young journalist should know about using Twitter."

"We access news on multiple devices. Shouldn’t those devices be smart enough to connect our actions to their presentation?" Analyst Ken Doctor discusses "all-access delight" in his latest newsonomics post on Nieman Lab.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-21 18:54

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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