WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


The Washington Post

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Last week, The Washington Post launched a new nightly video news show called The Fold, created primarily for Google TV and Android tablet devices but also available online.

“We’re not a newspaper, we’re not the evening news, we’d better not be a web video but we’re some combination of all those things that hopefully is informative and fun to watch,” says presenter Brook Silva-Braga in an introductory video.

It is a half hour show, shot from a studio within The Post’s newsroom, accompanied by footage from out in the streets and around the world. The first episode featured an interview with Henry Kissinger; subsequent guests include Economist Mark Zandi and former congressman Patrick Kennedy.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-10-10 17:24

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When Washington Post blogger Elizabeth Flock resigned from her position after making her second aggregation error in four months on blogPost, the Post’s breaking news blog, ombudsman Patrick Pexton wrote an opinion piece asserting that the paper had failed Flock as a young journalist; soon after Pexton’s column was published, a wave of criticism and concerns about the dangers of blogging surfaced, Poynter reported.  

According to Pexton’s article, Flock was often the only reporter writing for blogPost, writing an average of 5.9 posts per day on a wide array of topics. The blog was meant to achieve 1-2 million views per month, the article said.

Flock’s first error, which earned her a strongly-worded editor’s note criticizing her actions, was in reporting a viral but false story that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had used a slogan favored by the Ku Klux Klan in one of his speeches—without calling the campaign to confirm before publishing, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 17:27

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Yesterday, Bloomberg reporters such as TV host Emily Chang and news editor Sarah Rabil tweeted that US Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum dropped out of the running, citing The Washington Post as their source, according to The Huffington Post. As expected, the story spread like wildfire on Twitter. The problem? The Washington Post hadn’t published the story online yet—journalists were still waiting for confirmation from the Santorum campaign, the article said.

According to a Bloomberg spokesperson, Bloomberg received the news through The Washington Post’s syndication wire, the article said. Although the story was accurate, The Post was quick to deny the report on Twitter, the article said.

“Washington Post is NOT reporting that Santorum is dropping out,” a tweet from reporter Aaron Blake read. “We have NOT reported this, despite tweets to the contrary.”

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-11 17:53

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Is The Washington Post having an identity crisis?

It seems that ever since 6 August, when Patrick B. Pexton published his piece mooting the idea of a more populist standpoint for The Post, American journalists have been considering not only the type of paper The Post should be, but also contemplate the what political coverage means to the American audience and who actually constitutes said audience.

Pexton's piece attempts to analyse the range of news organisations operating in Washington and the choices they offer to the American people in terms of journalistic style, use of media and - crucially - cost.

In fact, Pexton adopts a very strong stance against the pay wall initiatives taken by the likes of The New York Times, which he feels marks them out as "the fee-based national newspaper for the liberal, cultured elite". This contrasts strongly with those who have embraced the idea of the so-called 'leaky pay-wall', which Poynter has praised for allowing people to choose to pay relying on "motivations such as convenience, duty or appreciation" which "are more compelling than coercion".

So, would a more populist approach for The Post be a success?

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-17 16:45

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Integrating social media into reporting adds value for readers: the story is more relevant, and it also unfolds in real-time. With available online tools, reporters can map stories, interact with readers, and attract more attention.

Intersect, a social platform for storytelling, is proving to be a great resource for reporters. Users publish stories (that happened in the past, present, or will happen in the future) and map the "intersection" where the story took place. They can add pictures and video to their text. Stories can be then shared with others who live in the vicinity or have also shared stories in the same location.

Other location-based services exist, such as FourSquare, but they are missing Intersect's storytelling element. Intersect's value is in the richness of content shared, and the added dimension of time - stories stay on the time-line, chronicled at a specific time and place.

The Detroit Free Press recently used the service in an investigative project. Reporter Tina Lam and photographer Brian Kaufman chronicled their 13-day journey through multiple states investigating the encroachment of Asian Carp up into the Great Lakes.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-07-05 16:41

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The Washington Post launched the redesign of its website during the weekend of March 11, which included a new Tumblr, according to Mediabistro.com. Now, only two weeks later, its new ombudsman, Patrick B. Pexton, has already had to issue a letter explaining the website's $7million changes.

This letter is in response to an actively angry reader response to the site. Pexton claims he was "deluged... with reader emails," and that they "ran about 8 to 1 negative." All emails, he promised, were sent to the tech team.

What exactly did readers have to complain about? After all, that same system is currently used by the New York Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and the Seattle Times, to name a few. EidosMedia's Méthode has become the platform for many major news corporations.

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Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-28 18:21

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Earlier last week, the staff of The Arizona Republic discovered some similarities between some of The Republic's articles and others appearing in The Washington Post.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-17 16:44

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Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook have changed the way people interact with the news. More than ever, people are able to respond and even expand on the news, affecting it in their own way. In recognition of this, The Washington Post launched its Tumblr blog, @innovations, yesterday. Tumblr is a blogging site that currently hosts over 14 million blogs.

According to a press release issued by the news organization and posted by Poynter, "@innovations is about what's happening at The Washington Post and journalism in general. It will experiment and be transparent throughout the process, posting explainers about new digital features and asking readers for new ideas."

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Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-11 12:44

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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