WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.09.2014


tabloid

The closure follows several hardships for the publication. Last year the Phoenix Media Group pulled alt-rock station 101.7 WFNX off the air, moving the property online. Last August, the publishers announced that the paper itself would merge with sister publication Stuff Magazine to become a magazine. Re-branding its content in the hopes of attracting the valuable advertisers, The Phoenix didn't get the national advertisers it needed. 

Publisher Stephen M. Mindich released a statement yesterday, citing the economic crisis of 2007 and media changes as the reasons for the closure. He says:

“These have been extremely difficult times for our Company and despite the valiant effort by many, many past and current staff to attempt to stabilize and, in fact, reverse our significant financial losses, we have been unable to do so and they are no longer sustainable.”

The news of the abrupt closure came as a shock to the staff, as they were at work on the next issue. Editor-in-chief Carly Carioli lamented the absence of a proper closure for the magazine, but praised the dedication of its readers.

“We didn't suffer from declining readership, online or in print -- only declining revenue.”

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-03-15 13:22

‘Privacy is for paedos’. ‘Circulation defines the public interest’. ‘In 21 years of invading people’s privacy I’ve never found anybody doing any good’. Fleet street veteran Paul McMullan’s take on modern journalism as related to the Leveson inquiry may not be pretty, but it sets in sharp relief the starkly amoral wasteland of sections of the tabloid press, the precise contours of which Lord Justice Leveson has been tasked to expose. In defending, amongst other things, hacking into the mobile telephone of a murdered schoolgirl, McMullan’s stance is abhorrent; yet it is also compelling, since it is the definitive articulation of what the Guardian called ‘the end point of the regulation-free, market-driven, anything-goes tabloid morality’.

Solutions to the present crisis are not noted for possessing a similar degree of uncompromising certainty, unless it is for that which is emphatically not desired. Large sections of the printed media face a paradoxical impasse, recognizing that the status quo of self-regulation has failed, but viewing any sort of official or statutory regulation as the death knell for freedom of speech. Before Leveson reports next month, therefore, the Carnegie Trust has taken the startlingly innovative step of bothering to ask the public exactly what they think should happen next, the results of which are rather revealing.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-25 17:51

In a move that would raise few eyebrows in the rest of the world but is still unusual in the United States, the Columbus Dispatch will soon be decreasing the size of its pages. Over the next two months, Ohio’s award-winning capital city newspaper is completing a transformation from the classical broadsheet format to what it is calling the “new broadsheet.”

The reinvention is based on three principles: convenience, portability and navigability. With its “easier-to-handle” proportions and increased use of colour, the new Dispatch will be “more like a daily magazine,” said the newspaper’s Editor Ben Marrison. It will not, however, skimp on content; to compensate for the loss in surface area, more pages will be added. “This isn’t a cost-saving endeavour,” emphasized Marrison in an interview with NPR’s All Sides. “This is taking the first version smartphone, and creating the fifth.” With mobile phones and computers constantly being reconceptualised to better complement consumers’ lifestyles, he reasoned, “why not reinvent the newspaper?”

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-10 18:13

The New York Daily News tabloid has launched a new online section which seeks to appeal to the city’s South Asian residents, paidContent reported.

The new section, called “Desi,” features South Asian news curated for an American immigrant audience, including stories about Bollywood, cricket and politics, the article said. The stories found on Desi are a mixture of original content and articles from the digital newswire Newscred, the article said. As we previously reported, Newscred filters content from more than 750 sources around the world, creating personalized bundles of online content for publishers.

NY Daily News Digital Senior Vice President Steve Lynas told paidContent that according to research conducted by the newspaper, second and third generation immigrants demonstrated an interest in South Asian News, but presented through an American lens.

Lynas also said that culture is more of a factor in determining what news people are interested in, implying that the notion of local news in general can be redefined, the article said.

“I don’t see a zip code as a good filter for community,” Lynas told paidContent.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-23 12:55

The Sun has announced that it will be launching a new Sunday edition this weekend.

"The Sun's future can now be reshaped as a unique seven-day proposition in both print and digital," stated Sun editor Dominic Mohan in an article discussing the launch. "Our readers' reaction to the announcement of a seventh-day Sun has been huge and we won't let them down."

For the rest of this story, please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-21 13:35

The arrests of five Sun journalists over alleged corrupt payments made to police and public officials have prompted angry responses from sections of the UK press and from the National Union of Journalists.

Sun deputy editor Geoff Webster, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker, picture editor John Edwards and deputy news editor John Sturgis were arrested early on Saturday morning and later released on bail.

Trevor Kavanagh at The Sun condemned the arrests in an article today, beginning "The Sun is not a 'swamp' that needs draining". He protested that the paper's journalists are being "treated like members of an organised crime gang" who are "subjects of the biggest police operation in British criminal history".

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-14 10:36

German president Christian Wulff has admitted on German television that it was a mistake to attempt to pressure leading tabloid Bild into killing a story. It emerged on Monday that Wulff had called Bild's editor Kai Diekmann and left a voicemail message in which he threatened "war" if Bild published a story about his personal finances.

As the Guardian reported, the message specifically made threats of "judicial consequences" and a "definitive breach" in relations with Axel Springer, Bild's publisher. Bild published the story.

Wulff then encountered widespread criticism from the around the German press, the Guardian reported, with the FT Deutschland calling on him to resign.

Wulff have rejected calls for his resignation and insists he was not trying to block the story, rather to delay it, and Bild has now asked the president to allow publication of a transcript "to clear up misunderstandings," the BBC reported.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-01-05 18:58

At a time when the conduct and the ethics of the red-top press (and others) is under the lens of the Leveson inquiry, the British press is defending tabloids in the wake of the conviction of two of Stephen Lawrence's killers.

The Guardian published an editorial - taken up by PressGazette's blog - which praised the Daily Mail for its coverage (entirerly summerized by the Mail itself here), starting from the famous page one accusation back in 1997. "It did not simply keep the case in the public eye. It also became a national reprimand to the criminal justice and political system in a wider sense", the editorial said.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-04 14:16

Tabloids have been getting some bad press lately. The press as a whole, and tabloids in particular, have been tarred by the The News of The World scandal; but let's not forget that the tabloid is something of a cultural institution. There are undoubtedly some darker aspects to this type of journalism, but provided they keep things above board, surely there is still a place for the humble tabloid in our newsstands?

UK Sunday tabloid sales have been enjoying a boom period since the collapse of The News of The World, gaining an extra 2 million in sales from June to July this year, as The Guardian reports. So it's clear that the love affair with the tabloid is not over for the British public at least.

The relationship between UK readers and Murdoch's tabloids is a long one and it has endured hard times before.

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-23 13:42

To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction - it seems that Newton's third law is as easily applicable to the media as it is to elementary physics. It is natural that in the aftermath of the News Corp. phone hacking scandal should prompt significant questions about press regulation across the globe. So, the industry is now lying in wait to see exactly what shape these reforms will take.

Even in Australia, Murdoch's birth place, questions have been prompted about the potential for a media review, as Prime Minister Julia Gillard admitted in a speech that recent revelations in Britain have prompted "considerations about the role of the media in our democracy". There have also been calls for reviews of media legislation from the leader of the Australian Greens Party, Bob Brown.

News Ltd., the Australian subsidiary of News Corp., has pre-empted any parliamentary inquiry by announcing an internal investigation into the possibility of similar malpractice. When questioned in an interview with Reuters , CEO and Chairman of News Ltd. John Hartigan claimed to be "Hugely confident that there is no improper or unethical behaviour in our newsrooms."

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-07-15 15:21

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