WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 23.04.2014


tablet

New technologies, the Web and mobile devices have clearly affected and changed our traditional approach to journalism. And they have definitely not only changed our reading habits but also when we consume it.

Newspapers' circulation numbers are generally down and we are ever more living in a media culture defined by appetizer-size articles and hastily assembled content, all tailored for discoverability by search engines, wrote Business Week.

But can old journalism benefits from these technological progresses? The answer seems to be yes, if we look at those apps or websites that offer a postponed consumption of long and deep analysis articles.

"Don't write the obituary for long-attention-span journalism quite yet," Business Week wrote. "Go to instapaper.com and download the plug-in for your Web browser." The app you can install on your iPhone, iPad, Kindle and soon your Android device will let you save the article you stumble onto during a full work day and read it later at your convenience.

Instapaper has - according to the article - more than a million users and one of its competitors Read It Later has more then 3 million.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-21 18:41

The International Newsmedia Marketing Association (INMA) has announced four key concerns that publishers want to raise with technology companies with regards to subscriptions on tablet devices.

INMA held an invitation-only roundtable session on tablet subscriptions in London yesterday, with close to 60 representatives of the European media industry present. A "robust and sometimes intense discussion" of new app subscription plans by Apple and Google took place, as well as about potential alternatives, and the possibilities of HTML5, a press release reported.

On Wednesday, the day before the meeting, INMA CEO Earl J. Wilkinson issued a statement saying that the association was "cautiously optimistic" about Google One Pass and the principles that it embraces, but "less optimistic about the new Apple policy."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-18 17:01

The Daily's editor in chief Jesse Angelo is trying to push his staff to up the calibre of their stories, according to an internal memo published in The New York Magazine and reproduced by The Guardian's Roy Greenslade.

"Folks, Egypt is over - time for us to get focused on covering America", the editor of the first tablet-only newspaper wrote.

"We need to get out there and start finding more compelling stories from around the country - not just scraping the web and the wires, but getting out on the ground and reporting".

He urges reporters to find stories other newspapers haven't found, to go where other media haven't been: "Find me something new, different, exclusive and awesome", he wrote.

Greenslade noted that this memo could be nothing more than a normal motivation spur from en editor to his staff, but it's interesting that it arrives just 14 days after the paper was launched.

Angelo doesn't call on staff to simply attract an audience, he asks his journalists to show the world The Daily can count within the papers that set the country's agenda: "Force the new White House press secretary to download The Daily for the first time because everyone at the gaggle is asking about a story we broke. (...) Force the rest of the media to follow us".
He wants news, he wants scoops.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-16 13:41

Apple is offering a new subscription service available to all publishers of content-based apps on the App Store, the company announced yesterday. As anticipated, it is the same billing service launched for The Daily, News Corp's tablet-only newspaper.

Before, it was only possible to make single purchases for in-app content through the app store, or to subscribe directly via the publisher. Now, customers can pick the length of time that they want to subscribe through iTunes' one-click system and are automatically charged based on the length of their commitment. Publishers set the price and length of the subscription, specified a press release.

Clearly, the advantage for publishers of going through Apple is that it is very easy for the consumer to sign up and start paying, as they already have all their details stored by iTunes: the 'one-click' method. One significant disadvantage, however, is that Apple takes a 30% share of the subscription price, as it does with other in-app purchases.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-16 13:08

Many believe that apps are the future for news distribution and that the iPhone (and smartphones in general) and the iPad (as well as other tablets) have started a revolution. The launch of the long-awaited The Daily, the iPad-only Rupert Murdoch's newspaper, is another step in this progression.

"Apps are all the rage, with The Daily's taking center-stage this week. With tabletmania sweeping the country, you can almost hear the howls of publishers across the country, as they implore their IT chiefs: "Get me an app, pronto!"" wrote Ken Doctor, on Nieman Lab, in an article that analysed the "Newseconomics" of these technological changes.

Apps through iTunes have reached the incredible number of 10 billions downloads.

But if apps appear to be the popular phenomenon of 2011, "publishers' on-ramp to digital reader payment," then "HTML5 is the future, they'll say", Doctor said.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-04 17:14

News Corp's The Daily launched yesterday amid suitable fanfare, for purchase in the US app store. Its addition to the more than 9,000 news apps available in the iTunes store is seen as highly significant, both because it is the first 'iPad-only newspaper' and therefore might be a forerunner into a new generation of digital publications, and because it is the first product to use a new payment system within iTunes.

It is not, as was widely expected, a static product that is only updated once a day, like a print newspaper, Poynter reported. Editor Jesse Angelo said at the launch that there will be the possibility to include breaking news updates; as well as new story pages inserted into the app, there will be Twitter feeds and tickers across the bottom of the screen.

With six sections - News, Gossip, Opinion, Arts & Life, Apps & Games, and Sports - The Daily "has the sensibility of a tabloid," said The New York Times. As yet there is no search or archive feature but that will be added later.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-03 15:19

Once there was the newspaper and reading it was "the modern man's morning prayer". Now we are inundated with information and news throughout the day, and our reading time is changing.

"If you're a modern worker, you're constantly being bombarded with information that you want to read, but that environment is not always the appropriate or best time to read that information," said Joshua Benton, director of the Nieman Journalism Lab, quoted by Jenna Wortham of the New York Times.The article focused on how apps have altered the way users read content on the Web allowing readers to decide how, when and where read articles they come across during the all day.
Many services and apps are available today for this purpose.

Wortham cited, amongst others, Read It Later, a Web and mobile service that saves articles to be read offline. Nate Weiner, the founder, is quoted saying that recent analysed data from his service found that iPhone and iPad owners prefer to save article for a personalised prime time, specifically from 8 to 10 pm regarding iPad reading.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-01 14:10

A new study shows that iPad owners are less willing to pay for apps and more willing to accept advertising in turn for free or lower-cost content, AdAge reported this week. The survey of 205 iPad users, conducted by online research company Knowledge Networks, found that iPad users download an average of 24 apps and of these, only six are paid.

"Not as many people are willing to pay for magazine or news content than we thought they would," Knowledge CEO Simon Kooyman told AdAge. Only 13% of those surveyed said that they would be willing to pay to watch a TV program or read a magazine on the iPad which they already have access to in its standard format, a press release said, while 86% said that they would be willing to watch ads to gain free access to content.

"Early-adopters are currently treating the iPad as an Internet appliance," said David Tice, vice president, group account director at Knowledge Networks, in the press release. iPad users tended to use the device like a home computer, with 97% regularly using Google search, AdAge said, and 91% browsing the web and emailing regularly.

Media apps, on the other hand, are used by 70% of people for reading books, 66% for music, 61% for reading newspapers and magazines and 50% for watching TV and movies.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-01-19 12:32

The day of The Daily will probably be Wednesday January 19, Jeff Bercovici announced in his Forbes blog. According to Bercovici's sources, that's the planned launch date for the iPad-only News Corp. publication, though the company declined to confirm it.

The landing page at thedaily.com now shows the logo and a "coming soon" message. In December, Peter Kafka already announced the week of January 17th as the probable launch period.

What we know so far is that the News Corp's dedicated iPad newspaper has a team of 100 journalists in New York who have already been working for weeks, and an initial reported investment of $30m.

Rupert Murdoch and (interestingly) Apple's Steve Jobs will appear together at a news event at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, but the date is subject to change, noted Reuters.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-11 12:28

Just four percent of adults read a newspaper using an app on a mobile phone or other mobile device last month, and 3.7 percent used an app to read a magazine, a new survey from GfK MRI has found.

However, those in the Millenial age group (born between 1977 and 1994) are strong app users - almost twice as likely than the average adult to have read a magazine using an app, and 73 percent more likely to have read a newspaper via an app in the past 30 days, the survey pointed out. Millenials made up 50.1 percent of all adults who used a newspaper app, and 57.3 percent of adults who used a magazine app.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-13 09:44

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