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A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Sun - 21.01.2018


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Windows 8, Microsoft’s first operating system to target touchscreen devices, launched last week following months of anticipation. Several news organisations have already developed apps for the platform, in cooperation with Microsoft.

At the 5th Tablet & App Summit in Frankfurt last week, Frank Wolfram, CTO of SYZYGY Group, Johan Mortelmans, Digital Innovation Manager, Corelio Publishing (which publishes De Standaard) and Danny Lein, Founder and CEO of Twipe Mobile Solutions offered their first thoughts on the new platform.

The key differentiator compared with other mobile operating systems is that Windows 8 provides “the productivity and the consumption world merged into one experience: with a switch of a button you can more between desktop and lean-back,” as Wolfram described.

He believes that the Windows 8 store will hold 150,000 – 200,000 apps by the end of the year, with a focus on quality rather than quantity

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-05 18:58

FT Stephen Pinches
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Know your customer, wherever they are, and use that knowledge, advised Stephen Pinches, Group Product Manager for Mobile & Emerging Platforms at the Financial Times, at the 5th Tablet & App Summit last week in Frankfurt. This philosophy is why the paper decided to build its own web-based app for the iPad rather than be part of Apple’s Newsstand: because as well as taking a 30% cut of subscription revenue, Apple does not provide publishers with subscriber data.

Within six weeks of Apple’s demand that publishers offer the same subscription deals through iTunes as they do on their own site, the FT rebuilt its native app as a web app. “It has all the things you would expect from a native app,” Pinches said, but “it allows us to enact whatever business model we choose.”

“We believe that data is fundamental to build our model,” he said, and gave personalized content as an example of how to strengthen relations with readers and offer a better service. “If you are a CEO of a media company we can tell you what other CEOs at media companies are reading.”

For Android devices, the FT took the HTML5 web app and “wrapped it in a little code” to put in the Google store. The paper has already launched a Windows 8 app too.

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-11-05 13:04

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Dear Mario,

Reading your blog today (garciamedia.com), I spotted a June post I had missed: what your dream tablet conference in 2012 would look like. We have just finished the programming for the coming 5th Tablet and Apps Summit (October 30 in Frankfurt).

So I ran a checklist hoping you might agree with our topics and take “your dancing shoes” to our summit…

- We seem to agree that it’s necessary to “Rethink Media Apps on Mobile and Tablets”. What you call the next generation of news apps.

- We did not call it an iPad conference. The iPad is still the best. Our speakers from Stern magazine and GQ magazine will probably be with you on that. But from a publisher’s point of view, you need to stimulate the competition. So we have invited a Microsoft evangelist and two European publishers who have started to explore Windows 8 possibilities and tablets.

- We are looking at the wider meaning of mobile platforms. You would probably not recommend that. But we do think it’s important to understand usage in order to better serve tablets AND smartphones.

- We focus on two things that are of importance to you:

Author

Valérie Arnould

Date

2012-10-03 10:56

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With those advances, however, come challenges and new ways of thinking. It is essential that editors rethink how the audience consumes content: they might start reading a story in print, continue it on their mobile as they travel, and finish it at work on a computer screen.

The new definition of news is anything you didn’t know 15 minutes ago – or even 15 seconds – says García. Many journalists lament that Twitter is where news breaks, he continued, but Twitter is just 140 characters: it is up to journalists to go deeper. 

There is still a place for print, says García, “I believe print is eternal, as long as it adapts.” Paper has the power of disconnect, he says, something that people crave on occasion in this hyper-connected age. But print publications must focus on what they do best. “Nobody expects breaking news in a paper – paper is old,” García believes: “the headlines have to be written to imply looking to the future, not ‘this has already happened.’”

The Washington Post is one paper that is sufficiently evolving in print, García says. It has reinvented its Sunday edition with surprise stories on the front, great photography, and a compact magazine. Colombia’s El Tiempo has also made significant changes, he pointed out, moving from six sections to three: what you need to know (news), what you should read (in-depth features) and what you should do (lifestyle and entertainment).

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-09-05 16:09

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Nearly 50 media outlets and media advocacy groups signed a letter on Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to allow live news coverage inside its walls for the first time during the decision on President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, reports AP via the Huffington Post. Check out The New York Times’ interactive feature on the Supreme Court decision, expected to take place later this month.

Seven judges of Britain's Supreme Court dismissed as "without merit" Wikileaks founder Julian Assange's "last attempt" at appealing against extradition to Sweden over alleged sex crimes, reports the BBC. Extradition proceedings are due to begin after a two-week grace period.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-06-15 18:24

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Online newspapers tired of catering to Apple’s in-app purchasing restrictions are starting to bypass the tech giant completely by creating web-based apps using HTML5 technology, Journalism.co.uk reports. The latest title to jump on the trend? Washington’s local paper The Chronicle, which offers the HTML5 app as part of a subscription bundle that includes complete online and print access, the article said.

The Chronicle’s web app is similar to a “native” iPad app in terms of user experience; rather than downloading the app from Apple’s Newsstand, though, one can access the web app through the iPad’s Internet browser and save it as an icon on the homescreen, the article said. App users can share articles through Facebook and Twitter, as well as download stories to read them offline later, the article said.

For the rest of this article please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-19 11:04

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According to the 2012 annual State of News Media report, more Americans than ever own and receive news from smartphones and tablet computers, the Pew Research Center reported.

A survey of 3,000 adults conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism found that 44% of people over 18 now own a smartphone, while 18% of adults own tablets—a 50% increase in tablet usage from the summer of 2011.

The survey found that, of the majority of Americans who own a desktop or laptop computer, more than half also own a smartphone. In addition, it found that almost a third of smartphone owners also own a tablet. Overall, 13% of the adults surveyed owned all three devices.

 

The survey also asked participants about their smartphone and tablet behaviors, discovering that about half of smartphone owners and more than half of tablet owners use their respective devices to get digital news.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-19 15:34

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2012 is presidential election year in the US and election fever has already started.
Starting with the caucases, continuing with the primaries and with their eyes already on the presidential race ending in November 2012, newspapers are getting ready.

"Election coverage is bigger than any one newsroom" so the right approach should be teaming up to be able to assure the coverage is as wide and accurate as possible, some believe. Or at least this is what NBC News and Newsweek/Daily Beast have decided to do in view of the upcoming presidential battle. Shared content will appear on the Newsweek pages and online on The Daily Beast.

The decision isn't surprising in itself, Justin Ellis wrote on NiemanLab. Double the resources, double the coverage, double the audience. Also, he explains, looking back to past electoral experience, this is not even new, quoting as examples the Times and CBS News or ABC News and The Washington Post partnering on polls.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-11 18:32

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USA Today is the latest paper to launch an app specifically for the Kindle Fire, Amazon's Android-powered tablet device that was launched at the end of September. The paper already has a general Android application for tablets, but seems to have deemed the device important enough to target directly.

The app features "a custom look and design specifically for the tablet" and provides "a convenient interactive package designed to take advantage of Kindle Fire's seven inch color touch screen," according to a press release from USA Today. The Fire runs on an older version of the Android OS than many new devices and has a very different user interface.

The app is available in Amazon's app store, which also boasts a Wall Street Journal Fire-specific app, as well as some Condé Nast titles. The Kindle Fire is already the second most popular tablet after the iPad and was projected to see a 13.8% market share in the last quarter of 2011, reported paidContent in December.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-01-05 11:52

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2011 was a big year for news in more ways than one. Reporters were amply tested in their coverage of big breaking news stories such as the death of Osama Bin Laden or Muammar Gaddafi, major disasters such as the Fukushima earthquake, and complex political unrest much of the Arab World.

Meanwhile, newspapers continue to seek an effective digital business model, to tackle the challenges posed by social media and community involvement, to create innovative tablet applications and respond to ethical dilemmas. Looking forward to 2012, what can we expect?

Social media - will Facebook remain the undisputed leader?

Social media sprang to the forefront of the global stage in early 2011, with many directly attributing the extent of the uprisings in the Arab World to the power of Facebook and Twitter. Citizen reporting and commentary on events using social media has also flourished in the Arab World, and Anglophones have followed Twitter coverage via NPR's Andy Carvin. Will this use of social networks to provoke and cover dramatic uprisings continue?

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-01-02 16:29

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