WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 30.09.2014


survey

Just before a networking coffee break in the Chicago Ballroom Foyer this afternoon, Brian Brett, Executive Director of Customer Research for The New York Times, will present the results of a “News Eco-System Study” to attendees of the INMA Audience Summit.

Commissioned by The New York Times, the study was an online survey conducted in the spring by the Knowledge Network, reaching over 3,000 U.S. residents aged 18 to 65 (of whom 85 percent are regular news consumers). Its purpose was to find out how people are consuming news, across platforms and between generations.

Thanks to a preview from Poynter’s Jeff Sonderman, here are four early points from the study’s findings:

1. Facebook is the dominant social network for news, especially for young people and mobile users

Fifteen percent of digital news consumers find news through social media, and Facebook is the place they are most likely to look.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-05 15:42

According to a report released by the American Society of News Editors (ASNE) and the Center for Advanced Social Research at the Missouri School of Journalism, the percentage of minorities employed in newsrooms is 12.32%, about a percentage point less than the survey from 2010, Poynter reports.

The ASNE began conducting the survey in 1978, when minorities composed only 4% of newsroom employees, and saw increases in minority presence in the newsroom up until 2006 (13.73%), according to Poynter. Since then, the percentage of minorities has been declining faster than the overall percentage drop in newsroom employees, the article said.

An article by ASNE stated that while overall newsroom employment decreased by 2.4% in 2011, minority employment in newsrooms decreased by 5.7%.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-05 14:58

A 30-minute video advocacy campaign exposing Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony got viral last week on the web reaching 17 million views on Vimeo and about 80 million views on YouTube.

The Kony 2012 video, realised by Invisible Children, generated a huge debate, amongst others, about how to conduct an advocacy campaign, how to cover complex issues trying to reach a wide audience or how to report on Uganda problems.

From a journalistic point of view, what was most interesting is how the video went viral so quickly thanks to the role of social media and online sharing.

An article on Forbes illustrated the 12 lessons we can learn from the video about how powerful social media can be in aiming for social changes.

The Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project published a survey about the role social media played amongst young people, ages 18-29, in sharing the video. It was based on telephone interviews conducted 9-11 March 2012, among a national sample of 814 adults 18 years of age or older living in the continental United States, the report says.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-03-16 18:52

According to a recent online survey by the University of British Columbia, 81% of Canadian adults would not pay to read news online and 90% would find free alternatives if their preferred news services started charging for content.

"These results should give pause to any news corporations in Canada or abroad that are considering erecting paywalls around their content," said Donna Logan, a professor emerita of UBC's Graduate School of Journalism and the lead author of the study Canadian Consumers Unwilling to Pay for News Online. Almost 1,700 adults took part in the survey.

What is perhaps the most striking number in the report is that only 30% of participants said they would be willing to pay for news online if no free alternative news websites were available. When compared with people in the U.S and UK, Canadians are slightly more reluctant to pay for news online.

The report found that of those willing to pay for news, the majority (34%) would prefer a flat-fee subscription model.

Author

Teemu Henriksson's picture

Teemu Henriksson

Date

2011-04-13 13:50

@font-face { font-family: "MS 明朝"; }@font-face { font-family: "MS 明朝"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }.MsoChpDefault { font-size: 10pt; }div.WordSection1 { page: WordSection1; } The Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism has just released the State of the News Media 2011, the eighth edition of the annual report on the health and status of American journalism.

The study shows that in terms of news consumption, mobile devices are emerging as one of the most promising fields, whether smartphones or tablets. There is also more interconnection between digital actors as boundaries become more fluid: news organizations rely more on independent networks to sell ads, aggregators are starting to concentrate more on news production while mainstream and legacy media are moving closer to the social media world and establishing new partnerships with local and hyperlocal startups, blogs and non-profit organizations.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-14 17:05

According to PEJ News and Coverage Index for September 6-12, news about Koran burning threats and other anti-Muslim sentiments made up 10% of the week's news. "Indeed," the report says, "attention to those hot button issues concerning Islam almost completely overshadowed coverage of the Sept. 11 commemorations themselves."

In an article published on PoynterOnline, Angie Chuang writes on how coverage of the supposed Koran burning reflects typical media attitudes. "What did the coverage tell us about the bigger picture of how the media cover Islam and Muslim Americans?" she asks, "and what can we learn from it?" She believes the episode reveals "ongoing shortcomings in the American media," pointing out that "often, the U.S. media just skim the surface when reporting on Islam and Muslims."

She quotes Asra Nomani, a former reporter as wishing that "the American media would cover Islam just they do any other industry from Coca Cola to the airline industry. Nomani advises the news media to "generate as much discussion and critical thinking about issues concerning Islam and anti-Muslim sentiment as it does with politics, the White House, and other topics."

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-09-15 17:00

Seven out of 10 Scots continue to read newspapers, either on print or digital, at least three to four times a week, a telephone survey conducted by Ipsos MORI Scotland, also called the Scottish Public Opinion Monitor, has revealed, AllMediaScotland.com reported yesterday.

While the affluence of area in which people live does not affect newspaper readership, the supposed disinterest of young readers towards newspaper content has been overstated, according to AllMediaScotland.com. Despite lower income households being more likely to have less or no Internet access, 70 percent of low income residents reported reading newspaper content regularly. This is almost equal to the 73 percent in the country's most affluent areas.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-06 11:29

A survey of 500 Spot.Us users carried out recently confirmed assumptions that objectivity has gradually taken on a new meaning in journalism. "The Internet has bypassed the once highly regarded norms of gatekeepers at a news desk, and it now it seems to be challenging the long held model of objectivity in journalism," the report posits.

The 500 people surveyed were 52% female and 48% male, and about 60% identified themselves as liberals. When asked if objectivity is even possible, only 60 respondents felt objectivity is the mainstay of journalism. 199 people however, agreed that "Objectivity is possible but difficult. It separates wheat from chaff." 123 Spot.Us members believed that "transparency is the new objectivity." 12.3% thought objectivity is impossible, and 2% (9 people) went with the statement that objectivity "is a crutch to prop old media up."

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-09-01 18:50

ComScore Media Metrix Rankings of Top 50 US properties for June 2010 have revealed the absence of any traditional newspaper websites among the top ten. Considering most of these websites have recently put in some effort towards improvement, there were much higher expectations than the statistics reported.

In any case, it was not an all gloomy tale as newspaper ratings were considerably higher than the same report from June 2009. Tribune Interactive, with 28m hits and The Washington Post Company with 26m hits made it to numbers 40 and 47 respectively, even though they were not at all on the list last year. New York Times Digital shot up three places to claim 13th, with a viewership of 69m. This is good news, but will this change when the NYT's paywall is implemented in January?

Google, Yahoo and Microsoft remained the top three visited sites, with better traffic than last year. Highly controversial content farm Demand Media moved up from 25th to 17th place, experiencing a near-doubling of traffic with 55m visitors compared to last years 29m. The role content farms have to play in journalism has been recently discussed at length.

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-08-24 13:52

A report based on research carried out by Pew Internet shows a dramatic increase in the use of mobile phones to access the Internet, with a 13% growth since last year. "While overall mobile phone ownership has not grown over the last year, cell owners now take advantage of a much wider range of their phones' capabilities," the report states.

Even though adults between ages 18 and 29 are leading the trend, with 65% of them accessing the Internet from their mobiles, other age groups are catching up. In fact, more than half of mobile phone users go online daily using their phones, with 43% of users going online several times a day compared to 37% in 2009. Recent studies in the UK by comScore had similar findings, with more than a third of smartphone users regularly accessing the internet through their phones.

Karen Peterson of The News Tribune confirms both studies: "The number of News Tribune readers getting news on their cell phones accounts for 5 percent of our Web traffic - about 60,000 unique visitors a month. The number has grown 165 percent in the past year," she writes. And unlike traffic to the newspaper website which is cyclical (building all morning and peaking at about 1 p.m. and dropping as low as 40% during weekends), mobile phone traffic remains consistent.

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-08-17 14:41

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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