WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


sourcing

Text: 

Does 'plundering' information from Facebook raise similar ethical questions to phone-hacking? Glenda Cooper, a lecturer at London's City University, studied the ethical implications of journalists using information from Facebook without the users' permission, as reported by Press Gazette.

"What kind of journalism are we getting if every part of your life is only a mouseclick away from being splashed across the front page of a national paper?" Press Gazette quotes Cooper as saying. Clearly, taking information that has been made public online is very different to phone-hacking, which involves stealing private information, but it is still using information that was not provided for journalistic purposes.

As journalists frequently have less time to report, due to both financial pressures and the need to break stories online quickly, this kind of "short-cut journalism," using social media to find out about individuals, has increased, the study said.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
24568
WEF URL: 
web_20/2012/02/is_facebook_a_valid_source_of_informatio.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-22 19:38

Text: 

Whilst covering the riots on 6th August, the BBC used photographs from social media sources without correctly identifying the people who captured the images and then displayed them on the Internet via Twitter.

The BBC Complaints department then incorrectly attested that there were no legal issues with copyright as the images were placed in the public domain.

The BBC has now taken the opportunity to clear the air and explain that this is not reflective of its policy and that it always attempt to credit the sources of images and other information gathered via social media.

In fact, the BBC has a whole department, the User Generated Content Hub, which is dedicated to finding and verifying online sources. (To read more the BBC's verification of online sources, see The Editors Weblog)

However, the BBC has now stated that it is prepared to release an image without correctly attributing its source, if the Senior Editor decides that it is in the public interest.

The 'publish first, ask questions later' approach is becoming ever more common in media, as news organization must keep abreast of the constant tide of information from social media.

Link: 
Controls
WEF ID: 
23908
WEF URL: 
newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/08/bbc_clarifies_use_of_social_media_photog.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-17 18:54

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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