WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Thu - 23.11.2017


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A Brazilian car washer caused some of his loved ones to faint and others to run away in fear when he strolled into his mother’s home during his own funeral, police said yesterday. I am aware of this because the Toronto Star wrote about it, and during its first 12 hours the story was one of the most shared news reports out of Canada on the web (alongside two about hockey). I learned this through Spike, a tool that uses social metrics to track the world’s hottest news stories.

Developed by Dublin-based start-up NewsWhip and launched in beta last week, Spike uses tracking technology to find out which stories are getting the most attention on Facebook and Twitter. Users can monitor the web’s most viral stories by time frame (published in the past one, three, 12 or 24 hours), by region (currently the site has an Anglo-Saxon focus, but it is expanding) by topic, and by publisher. NewsWhip has designed Spike as a pro tool for journalists, and plans to begin charging later this year, according to Journalisk.co.uk. Until November 7, however, the tool is free for anyone to use without signing up.

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-24 15:45

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The top 40 most shared stories in America during 2011 have been revealed by Facebook. So what does America's 'most shared' list tell us about the state of media consumption and journalism in the US today?

The Huffington Post dominated topped the chart. 10 articles from the online-only news organisation feature in the list, more than any other outlet. The highest charting entry from the HuffPo was entitled: 'Michelle Obama dances 'The Dougie' & 'the Running Man''. Not exactly Pulitzer winning reporting. However, when it comes to all things political, HuffPo Politics was the most visited political news website in the USA this September, according to comScore.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-15 17:02

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Last week Gene Weingarten wrote a scathing piece about the integrity of "branding", a new media phenomenon in which journalists create personal brands to stand out. Branding involves Facebook pages, personalized domain names, Twitter accounts, and sometimes even sharing personal details. In the Project for Excellence in Journalism's 2009 State of the Media Report for 2009, the shift "towards the individual and away from journalistic institutions" was identified as a major trend in the industry.

Weingarten's criticism is based on the idea that branding oneself is selling out, akin to journalists "marketing themselves like Cheez Doodles". In his Washington Post article, he claims that branding is redefining journalism "from a calling to a commodity". His remarks were triggered by a journalism student's letter, in which she asked about how he has managed to brand himself so successfully.

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Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-28 17:51

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Social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook have changed the way people interact with the news. More than ever, people are able to respond and even expand on the news, affecting it in their own way. In recognition of this, The Washington Post launched its Tumblr blog, @innovations, yesterday. Tumblr is a blogging site that currently hosts over 14 million blogs.

According to a press release issued by the news organization and posted by Poynter, "@innovations is about what's happening at The Washington Post and journalism in general. It will experiment and be transparent throughout the process, posting explainers about new digital features and asking readers for new ideas."

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Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-11 12:44

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It was the Merriam-Webster dictionary's word of the year in 2004 and only seven years later, some are saying that it is already dying...

Blog: what is the future of blogging?

In an interesting article on Gigaom, Mathew Ingram commented on a story appeared that on the New York Times and claimed that "Blogs wane as the young drift to sites like Twitter".

The NYT article was based on a Pew Research Center study which argued that blogging is on the decline, particularly among young people, as the usage of blogs among those aged 12 to 17 it fell by half between 2006 and 2009 and among 18-to-33-year-olds it dropped two percentage points in 2010 compared to two years earlier.

The theory put forward in the study is that blogging is being replaced by sites like Facebook or Twitter, where people could post their photos, links and share ideas more easily and more quickly.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-23 14:11

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-17 18:11

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Many equate the invention of the Internet to the dawn of communication itself, and while this is largely inaccurate--human beings have been communicating ever since carving petroglyphs in the Stone Age--it has greatly enhanced our means of communicating, via digital networks that span the globe.

As applied to news making, the Internet, and more specifically accompanying social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter, have enabled journalists to circumvent traditional barriers of communication to share what's happening in blocked off and censored environments. This is currently going on in Egypt with the help of satellite phones, reports Mashable.

Beyond the debate of whether social media is inspiring a social revolution (something aptly discounted in a recent article by Malcom Gladwell for The New Yorker), the heart of the matter for the news industry is this: advanced communication technologies that are linked to the Internet have created a gateway for public access to international news through journalists reporting on real-time events from across state borders and often embedded in communities of interest. This is what is happening in Egypt right now despite Mubarak's attempts to block access.

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Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-01 15:53

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There is not a direct relationship between the national circulation and the number of fans and posts and comments on the Facebook page, according to a study by The Bivings Group. The company has completed a newspaper online interactivity report looking at Facebook fan engagement amongst the top 100 US newspapers (determined by circulation).

The aim of the study was to compare large and small newspapers across the United States by looking at the numbers of fans that interacted with the newspaper and amongst themselves via posted content on Facebook Fan pages.

The regional Denver Post, for example has a higher number of Facebook fans than the national Los Angeles Times, and the Wall Street Journal, which is the largest US newspaper in terms of circulation, is behind the New York Times in terms of numbers of Facebook fans and interactions with readers.

In addition to ranking each paper by the number of Facebook fans, the report also looked at number of comments per post, and the variety of post on each page.

Within over 1,000 Facebook fan page individual wall posts analyzed, from the middle of November until December 13th:

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-20 13:01

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U.S. blog network Gawker Media was hit by hackers, who gained access to the company's servers over the weekend, hacking into Gawker, as well as its sister sites Deadspin, Fleshbot, Gizmodo, io9, Jezebel, Jalopnik, Kotaku and Lifehacker. They gained access to up to 2.5 million usernames and passwords, which could be the "most damaging cyber security breach of a media company to date," the Atlantic Wire reported.

One of the alleged hackers, part of a group identifying themselves as "Gnosis," e-mailed Mediaite, saying Gawker was targeted because of "their outright arrogance. It took us a few hours to find a way to dump all their source code and a bit longer to find a way into their database."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-12-14 11:35

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