WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 24.04.2014


social media

Recently-launched educational platform Coursekit brings social media training directly into journalism classrooms, Poynter reports.

Created by three University of Pennsylvania students, Coursekit is a free organizational program for instructors which operates on a course-by-course basis, according to the Coursekit website.

The Chronicle for Higher Education names Coursekit as the newest in a series of competitors to Blackboard, an educational program used by the majority of colleges in the US.

In addition to offering traditional instructor’s tools, such as gradebooks, calendars, and assignment submissions, Coursekit also features a new social networking tool: the Stream. The Stream acts as a pseudo-Facebook wall where students can start or comment on academic discussions, enabling them to simulate professional media curation.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-13 19:05

News.me has launched a new bookmark tool called Exposé, which it calls “your social editor-in-chief.” When a user visits a news site, they can click on a bookmark and Exposé will show them any articles from that site that their friends have recommended on Twitter.

“Front page editors at major publishers like the New York Times and the New Yorker are masters at laying out content on their homepages, and the recommendations implicit in that layout are incredibly valuable,” write the founders of News.me on their site. “But more and more, we’re learning that recommendations from our friends can be just as useful,” they continue.

News.me already has apps for the iPhone and iPad and a daily email service, all of which deliver the stories shared most by the users’ friends on Twitter and Facebook. The interesting aspects of the new Exposé tool are that it easily allows users to check out just their favourite sites, and it is integrated into their browsing experience. It provides a link to the article and quotes the relevant tweet, so it is immediately clear to a user exactly what their friends have been saying about it.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-13 16:38

Yesterday, Twitter announced its acquisition of blogging platform Posterous Spaces, a move which could have interesting consequences for online sharing.

“Today we are welcoming a very talented group from Posterous to Twitter,” stated a Twitter news blog post. “This team has built an innovative product that makes sharing across the web and mobile devices simple—a goal we share.”

Posterous, which allows users to upload blog posts, photos or videos by sending an email, simplifies online sharing and cross-blogging for the tech-averse, as previously reported by Poynter. Co-founded by CEO Sachin Agarwal and Garry Tan in 2008, Posterous also allows users to post on-the-go via mobile phones, which can help bloggers share news-worthy information faster than a traditional blogging platform.

In a blog post, the Posterous team expressed its approval of the acquisition, citing the two companies’ common interests in simplifying the sharing process for users.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-13 14:03

Al Jazeera has launched a video campaign to teach people how to use Twitter and Facebook, with the ultimate aim of empowering them as citizen journalists.

The Qatar-based news organisation has started a new YouTube Channel named Al Jazeera Unplugged to distribute videos, teaching users the basics of social networking. 

For the moment, the information is very basic indeed. “Twitter is a website where people can send and receive ultra-short messages called Tweets,” begins one clip.

Users might question the wisdom of running an educational campaign about how to use social media on a social media platform – surely most people who are on YouTube already know how to use Facebook?

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-09 17:04

Facebook’s newest feature allows users to create special sections or feeds for specific topics via ‘lists’ in a new Interests section. “Interest lists can help you turn Facebook into your own personalized newspaper,” says Eric Faller, a Facebook software engineer, on the company’s site.

The new tool can be used much like Twitter lists: anyone can create a list on a specific topic and others can subscribe to it, if the creator chooses to make it public, or visible to his or her Facebook friends. Creating a list from pages or people who you already follow is straightforward, and Facebook then suggests other organisations and people who you might want to add to it. Only the creator can edit the list.

Lists are accessible in an Interests section to the left of the newsfeed. The most popular stories from lists you subscribe to will also be shown in your main newsfeed, reported TechCrunch. Facebook gives a couple of examples of lists created by its staff: NFL Teams and 2012 US Presidential Candidates.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-03-09 14:36

Print circulation dropping, print advertising revenues down… In the current climate many newspaper companies are struggling just to survive.

Yet difficult as it is to break even, in itself it’s not enough. To have a future, media companies can’t simply find ways to slow the decline of their old print readership, they have to actively go out and find new young readers who will sustain their content in the days to come.

Inevitably, this means that newspapers have to make sure that they are where young people can find them: they must have strong coverage on social media.

But as traditional organisations strengthen their social media presence, many don’t know how to adapt to the new platform. Some assume that generating a young following on social media means being informal and chatty. Here's a case about how trying to generate an informal conversation on Twitter can backfire if you get the tone wrong:

Rather than patronizing young readers on Twitter and Facebook, the key to success can be creating an authentic voice that young readers will trust and engage with. A leader in this area is Economist:

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-07 15:37

Facebook has introduced new brand pages that more closely resemble the 'timelines' that have already been available to individuals for some time. An introductory video from the social network's marketing team says "We will be giving you new ways to tell your story and express your page's identity" and promises "better tools to manage the activity on your page and to have conversations with your audience."

One key change is the introduction of a 'cover photo' - a large picture across the top of the page - in addition to the profile picture. Facebook advises that the cover photo should be a unique photo that expresses your page, and forbids placing advertisements or promotions here. It recommends pictures of your product, or of people using your services. The profile picture will continue to be used around Facebook, and the company therefore suggests using a logo.

The new layout also allows brands to highlight content more effectively. They can now 'pin' a post to the top of the timeline stream for up to a week, or 'star' a post to make it wider. 'Milestones' are larger, dated posts that can be used to emphasise important moments in the history of a brand or company, and to create a more thorough timeline, you can change the post date of content so you can go back and fill in gaps. The New York Times has used this to highlight 'select moments' from its 160+ year history such as the 1928 presidential election or the 1977 blackout.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-29 18:58

"Be strategic, be different, and strive for meaningful interactions," advised Liz Heron, social media editor at The New York Times, speaking about social media at news:rewired in London on Friday.

The social media world is changing fast and 2011 brought social media into the mainstream, Heron stressed. "In early 2010 we in the social media team were evangelisers, by 2011 we were highly in demand," she said. The team has set up social media trainings, put together guidelines and experimented as much as possible with the paper's flagship accounts, she added.

There are more than 400 New York Times journalists on Twitter and more than 50 now use Facebook's subscribe feature. "Once a journalist is a sophisticated user of social media it becomes part of their job and they can use it to save time," she stressed - it doesn't have to be seen as an additional task.

The upcoming US presidential elections and ongoing preparations are providing an exciting social media challenge for news organisations. There are plenty of journalists live-tweeting debates and primaries, so to stand out among the cacophony of voices, Heron and her team are keen to strive to "empower our readers to have truly authentic interaction with newsmakers."

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-06 13:06

Facebook's $5 billion IPO filing this week has left the world in little doubt about the growing importance of social media in our lives. Now, both adapting to this trend and looking at its power, Reuters has launched a social media hub with a special focus on the interaction between social media and business.

Social Pulse, as the new hub is called, contains a curated selection of news from across Reuters' social media networks. The top section, titled The Hit List, features the most popular stories shared by people followed by Reuters accounts and Reuters journalists on Twitter. In a blogpost about Social Pulse, Reuters stresses that it follows influential "newsmakers", to bring its readers stories popular with the people who are setting the news agenda. The section is managed through the curation company Percolate, also used by IPG and American Express.

For the rest of this article please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-06 10:38

"No comment".

Business executives had become more and more adept at hiding behind this phrase, argues David Carr of The New York Times in an article published on Sunday. Not only that, but major figures in business are often obscured by "communications" teams that are anything but communicative. But now, suggests Carr, "Twitter has the potential to cut past all that clutter".

Carr writes that thanks to Twitter "there's a chance to get a glimpse into the thinking of otherwise unapproachable executives, and sometimes even have a real dialogue with them".

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-01-31 18:26

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation