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A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Tue - 23.08.2016


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So what might we identify as the motivations behind creating a media expert role? For one, this announcement comes in the wake of Twitter’s appointment of Simon Rogers as its new data editor (see previous Editors Weblog article) - a move that signalled the social network site’s clear intention to increase its potential as a force of serious journalism, having somebody sift through their sea of tweets in order to fish out compelling news-worthy stories. Twitter already has a prominent media expert in its midst: Erica Anderson, who made it into Forbes’ "30 under 30" media list, appointed in February 2011 to "specialize in helping news organizations and journalists use Twitter effectively to find sources, develop comprehensive stories and engage audiences in meaningful civic discussions." Anderson already set up 'Twitter for Newsrooms' in 2011, an online toolkit designed to help journalists use Twitter for "finding sources, verifying facts, publishing stories, [and] promoting [their] work and [themselves]," already a significant step in fostering a relationship between Twitter and the media.

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Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-05-02 17:55

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According to French journalist Laure Nouraout on meta-media.fr, the summit panelists made reference to the Boston bombing regularly throughout the day to provide a solid basis for their discussions. As David Hayward, Director of the BBC College of Journalism's events programme wrote on his blog: "Last week was quite extraordinary for breaking news stories. I was in New York for most of it, preparing for the BBC College of Journalism and New York Times Social Media Summit #smsnyc. As many people pointed out, the event could not have come at a better time for the issues that were to emerge."

The summit took a critical glance at the way in which breaking news is treated and consumed by the masses. The general consensus seems to be that events in Boston have acted as a real game-changer for the relationship between journalism and social media. Developments during the Boston bombing scandal were reported and discussed on Twitter on an unprecedented scale and hereby revealed the extent to which traditional methods of news reporting such as TV and radio are growing largely outdated.

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Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-23 17:49

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Woo Hee Chang believes she has the solution to a troubling paradox at the heart of the online news industry. As journalist Tyler Falk discusses in an article (in French) for business and technology website, smartplanet.fr, media businesses want their content to go viral and, of course, they want to monetise it, but more and more have made their content largely inaccessible by putting up paywalls. Some choose to keep a minority of their articles freely accessible, whilst others choose to provide a title and short summary for every article.

But blocking content to non-paying customers, seen now as a financial necessity for many newspapers such as the New York Times, can lead to the "stagnation" of a newspaper's readership. When a paper starts charging for content, many potential new readers steer clear, especially in the case of a brand new publication which has no established reputation or faithful readership willing to pay for continued access to trusted content. This paywall strategy constitutes a "wall" in the very literal sense of the word – it erects a barrier between the newspaper and its potential audience.

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Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-18 17:37

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No one knows for sure if the Boston Marathon bombings were terrorist attacks, but there are signs pointing in that direction. If so, this would be the first terrorist attack in the US since 9/11.

A lot has changed since 2001, especially how we consume news. Back then, people turned on their TVs or read the papers. Twelve years later, we look to social media for the latest scoops. After all, when the phone lines are down and the newsrooms are scrambling, social media offers instant gratification.

The first news I got about the bombings were from Facebook. I go to Boston University and most of my Facebook friends are in Boston. I’m studying abroad in Paris. When the news broke, no one knew what was going on. I remember going to Yahoo and watching a live broadcast, but it gave little information. My friends on Facebook posted nonstop about what they saw or heard. The same went for Twitter. Ultimately, I got most of the news through social media. It was faster and more direct.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-17 13:39

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Should the UK media dutifully adopt a subdued form of respect following the death of a world leader who, having divided opinion so significantly during her premiership, should surely be expected to continue polarising views in the wake of her death? Ought journalists to be restricting their reactions to a purely reverential mourning, rather than using it as yet another excuse to argue over the Thatcher legacy? Or isn’t it inevitable, and indeed justifiable, that her death will spark strong opinions and reactions, prompting us to look back over her time in power and analyse it critically, even if this does mean highlighting the negative in some cases more than the positive?

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Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-10 13:21

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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