WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 20.04.2014


safety of journalists

Offering a groundbreaking platform for journalists silenced by the repressive regimes of their home countries, Lebedev’s project will not only carry out insightful case studies into the hardships encountered by individuals throughout their journalistic careers, but will also provide an arena for these journalists’ own work, promising to enrich the UK public’s awareness of the political situation in these countries by giving them access to the investigative journalism of true insiders. In an article published online yesterday, Lebedev, owner of the Independent and Evening Standard newspaper, explained his personal motivations behind the project – namely, the murder of Anna Politkovskaya, a journalist who was working for his family’s Russian newspaper, Novaya Gazeta, when she was assassinated as a result of her work on exposing Russian atrocities in Chechnya.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-30 17:36

The bomb found under the car of Pakistani journalist and TV talk show host Hamid Mir earlier this week highlighted the urgent need for governments to act to ensure the safety of journalists.

Only a month ago, at a symposium on this issue in London, Mir was telling of the death threats he and his colleagues were receiving daily. Messages were being sent directly to journalists' mobile phones and email accounts, because of their support for the blogger Malala. There was no evidence that the state was doing anything to protect the recipients.

“Where are the state security agents?” Mir asked at the time: “Why are they not intercepting these threatening messages and protecting journalists?”

That day Mir put his signature, alongside those of 40 media organizations and individual journalists, to the “London Statement”, an eight-point declaration that condemned killings and attacks against journalists and expressed dismay over the lack of government action.

Author

Cherilyn Ireton's picture

Cherilyn Ireton

Date

2012-11-29 18:33

‘One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors’, remarks Plato in Book I of The Republic – and that was in fifth-century Athens, the cradle of democracy, political freedom and western culture. One feels that his diagnosis of the present miasma of dysfunction, corruption and post-modernistic nihilism at the heart of Greek governance may have elaborated on that aphorism somewhat. 

Indeed, the headline of an article in today’s Guardian by the recently arrested journalist Kostas Vaxevanis makes a similar point. In publishing the names of over 2,000 wealthy Greeks alleged to have Swiss bank accounts, Vaxevanis attracted censure from authorities who seem more concerned with the prosecution of journalists than with suspected tax dodgers and money launderers. The standoff coincides with a strike due to start today over the suspension of two popular television presenters after they criticized a government official, in what together amounts to a significant assault on freedom of expression by a political class who appear to either comprise or be in thrall to the moneyed elite.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-30 18:43

With four days to go before the Ukrainian parliamentary elections on 28 October, the outlook for freedom of expression in the country’s media remains decidedly mixed. As the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva today starts the second cycle of its Universal Periodic Review, Reporters Without Borders (who, like WAN-IFRA, have this year compiled a report on the subject) have ‘sounded the alarm’ over conditions surrounding freedom of information which, it states, ‘have worsened to such a degree that the country is at a turning point’. Ukraine has long been a concern for free speech campaigners; background to the ongoing international dialogue can be found in recent posts on this blog here and here, along with the full report from the delegation sent there in July of this year.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-24 17:12

The escalating and disturbing threat to the safety of journalists drew together an extraordinary group of editors, frontline journalists, professionals and press freedom monitoring groups from the global media community at the BBC College of Journalism in London yesterday.

They signed an eight point declaration to express concern and demand action from governments to stop the killing and harassment and to end impunity.

The World Editors Forum and WAN-IFRA, representing editors, publishers and news organisations in 120 countries, signed the London Declaration ahead of the United Nations Vienna Inter-Agency meeting with media and journalist organisations on 22-23 November.

In a move of rare solidarity, representatives from major newspapers and broadcasters in some of the most dangerous countries for journalists, including Pakistan, Mexico, Russia, Sri Lanka and Somalia, agreed that threats, both physical and legal must end.

Author

Cherilyn Ireton's picture

Cherilyn Ireton

Date

2012-10-19 15:06

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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