WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Wed - 03.09.2014


research

We have lots of hard facts about how digital media is revolutionizing the news business. But often there is less information out there about precisely what that means for journalists doing their jobs.

Now Poynter reports that the Knight and Tow Foundations have given the Columbia School of Journalism a grant of $2 million to fund studies into best practices in digital journalism. The research may address questions like how to use real-time analytics, how to measure engagement, how to incorporate data into reporting and how to discover how much the audience benefits from article commenting, Poynter reports.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-30 18:05

Four main journalism research centres and labs in France have decided to form a unique centre, the GIS Journalisme (Groupe d'intérêt scientifique).

They believed that academic research in the media and journalism fields in France was too dispersive and fragmented within different disciplines, from sociology to political science to communication and IT domains.

The main aim,- explains Eric Lagneau on the AFP MediaWatch - is to unify their efforts and their knowledge, make exchanges of ideas easier and enhance the results of the studies and researches conducted.

The four centres are CARISM (Centre of media analysis and interdisciplinary researches) of the University of Panthéon-Assas, CRAPE (European Political Science Research Centre), University of Rennes 1, ELICO, Research centre of University of Lyon and GRIPIC, the Paris - Sorbonne research team on information and communication processes.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-29 13:09

Recent reports on the status of women in the media in the United States and the UK have shown the low numbers of women in the newsroom. Today, the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF) released the full contents of its "Global Report on the Status of Women in the News Media," according to its press release. These numbers also displayed a lack of women in management positions in newsrooms across the world.

The 394-page report surveyed more than 500 companies in 59 nations in every region of the world. More than 150 researchers interviewed executives, using a 12-page questionnaire. The study was held over a 2-year period. The news organizations included newspapers, radio, and television. Magazine and internet-only companies were not included due to their difference in structuring and staffing.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-23 18:36

"The French are more and more «médiavores» and the traditional media are still competing and withstanding the inexorable wave of new media," commented Le Figaro, referring to the annual study «Media in life» carried out by Médiamétrie.

The study examines daily media consumption, registering the number of contacts that people of more than 13 years old have with one or more media during the day.

The research shows that from 2006 to 2009 the number of contacts with both traditional and digital media increased of 9,7%.

Not surprisingly, the Internet shows the most significant increase with an average of 4.6 contact moments throughout the day, compared with 3.2 of 2008. However, as Les Echos reported, at the first two positions of the podium there are traditional media: television with 15.8 daily contacts and radio with 9 daily contacts.

The same increase in digital media consumption has been shown in other international researches.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-01 13:13

Newspapers are taking advantage of the fact that cellphones are no longer just used for talking. Mobile devices allow newspapers to reach their readership no matter where they are, turning phones into mini-newspapers. Some in the industry suggests that users are more likely to pay for apps than for news on the web, potentially solving the paywall issue. Professionals in newspapers are closely watching the technology battle between cell phone builders, to keep on top of different operating systems for future newspaper apps. Reuters recently reported that Google's Android OS has leaped over competitors and could possibly rank second place worldwide by the end of the year.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-14 15:56

It is no surprise that there is a divide in opinions between whether the digital age is good for newspapers. Many in the media industry believe that technology is the way of the future for newspapers, yet it is frustrating that newspapers are in limbo between declining print circulation and online consumption not quite full-fledged. In Pew Research Center's biennial report on news trends that was released yesterday, the survey reveals how new technologies are slowly moving towards improving news consumption. Newspapers might not be in competition with the online revolution, but previously separate news mediums might prove to rival newspapers in the future.

New technologies are not completely eradicating traditional forms of news. Rather, consumers are integrating the two forms of media. Thirty-nine percent of Americans in the survey sample said they got their news from solely from traditional sources of news, while 36% of people received news from both online and traditional media. Interestingly, only 9% of people surveyed consumed news from only digital sources.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-09-13 15:27

According to findings from reseach carried out in May by Digital Media Test Kitchen, "few mobile news apps have pushed the creativity envelope." The report stated that "compared to the innovation that's rampant in the non-news mobile app world, the news apps we reviewed seem behind the curve."

Six newspaper apps were reviewed, USA Today, the New York Times, Associated Press, The Guardian, Politico, and The Huffington Post. "Most of the news applications that have been created by single news brands do not do enough to encourage interactivity, customization, or creativity...there is an overall lack of interactivity compared to the news brands' regular Web sites." Regarding creativity, these apps generally stuck to the same pattern of pairing headlines with thumbnails photos. However, these thumbnail photos can usually not be enlarged when clicked on, "a disappointment when the image was too small to discern adequately."As for interactivity, while most of the apps permitted sharing on social networks, only the HuffPost app allowed users to comment.

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-08-30 13:46

Conventional knowledge dictates that younger generations dominate social media trends. However, older adults are now the largest growing demographic for use of social media. Pew Research found that between April 2009 to May 2010, the number of adults aged 50-64 who use social networking sites such as Facebook and Linkedin grew 88%, while usage among adults who are 64 and over went up by 100%. Editor&Publisher recently wrote an article stating newspapers' largest readership base is 55 years, and according to Pew Research this age group may be spending increasingly more time online.

While internet users ages 18-49 still dominate social platforms, when it concerns consuming news online the statistics appear relatively equal across generations. 44% of users ages 18-29 and 45% of users ages 30-49 read their news online. By comparison, users aged 50-64 who consume their news online is not too far behind the younger population at 42%, while the 64+ age category falls behind at 34%.Yet as social media use continues to grow among people 50 years and older, newspapers will be able fully employ Facebook, Twitter, and other social platforms to increase the consumption of news among a wider spectrum of users.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-08-30 12:54

In a recent Pew Research report concerning news coverage of different demographics, Muslims and low Social Economic Standing groups are portrayed too negatively in the media. Negative coverage of the black and hispanic communities trail closely behind.

When asked about coverage of Muslims in the news, 40% of the younger generations and 24% of those 65 years and older believed it was too negative. The difference becomes more significant when assessing factors of educations, with 51% of those with a college degree and 30% of people with a high school diploma or less believing coverage is too negative.

Author

Stefanie Chernow

Date

2010-08-20 16:37

Sunlight Foundation's latest launch, Poligraft, aims at making research easier through providing obvious political trends surrounding information. In Ellen Miller's description on the Sunlight Foundation Blog, Poligraft "extracts text from any news story, blog post or news release and runs it through a filter to determine the "influence connections" between the entities listed in that text."

Closely linked to Transparency Data, Poligraft can serve either as a user-driven website or as a bookmarklet, "offering an interactive snapshot of the connections between the players in the text you want to review." Although Miller admits that the tool is still far from perfect, it is also far from useless and Megan Taylor of PoynterOnline writes more about how journalists get best use out of the tool.

Author

Dawn Osakue

Date

2010-08-19 11:43

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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