WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Tue - 16.09.2014


redesign

The Minnesota Star Tribune announced today, April 5, a redesign of its website.

"Today we are introducing a new look for the Star Tribune website, which millions of Minnesotans rely on for their daily breaking news", the site claims.

"Key sections such as Business, Politics, Entertainment and Opinion have been retooled. We've also made Business and Politics easier to find by adding them to the menu bar at the top of every page", a Q&A page says.

Apparently, the site is easier and faster to navigate, and it features more video and photography content.

According to a press release, CEO Mike J. Klingensmith explained the site was also re-architected to enable expanded advertising opportunities. "In addition to a better homepage experience, the new site offers more of what progressive advertisers are looking for: more rich media ad units, behavioural targeting, geo-targeting and search marketing", he said.

As the press release specified, more than 7 million monthly unique visitors generate over 100 million monthly page views at StarTribune.com.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-04-05 17:11

The Washington Post launched the redesign of its website during the weekend of March 11, which included a new Tumblr, according to Mediabistro.com. Now, only two weeks later, its new ombudsman, Patrick B. Pexton, has already had to issue a letter explaining the website's $7million changes.

This letter is in response to an actively angry reader response to the site. Pexton claims he was "deluged... with reader emails," and that they "ran about 8 to 1 negative." All emails, he promised, were sent to the tech team.

What exactly did readers have to complain about? After all, that same system is currently used by the New York Post, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, and the Seattle Times, to name a few. EidosMedia's Méthode has become the platform for many major news corporations.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-28 18:21

"It's a cleanup, more than anything," says Chris Dolan, managing editor of The Washington Times, to On Media at Politico. "There is some redesign, but it's more going back to the wider version of the paper to make it more readable and better for layouts." The redesign will bring a return to missed sections of the paper--specifically the sports, metro and life sections--and are being designed by those who have designed for the paper before, so as not to startle loyal readers from the appearance of the new addition.

To support the relaunch of these three sections, the paper has hired approximately 30 new employees, with plans to ultimately hire 40 to 45 in total. According to Politico, Mike Harris, formerly editor for CBS Sports and AOL FanHouse, and sports editor of The Richmond News Leader and The Richmond Times-Dispatch, was named sports editor.

Why were these sections originally canceled?

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-03-17 18:09

After long, quiet speculation on its redesign, Tina Brown's first issue of Newsweek comes out this week, reports Poynter. Brown is the publication's first-ever female editor. The issue has been heavily anticipated since the merger of online news site The Daily Beast and Newsweek earlier last year.

The cover features Hillary Clinton and an article on her mission to put women and girls at the forefront of the new world order. This is in tune with Forbes' prediction late last year that Brown would likely emphasize the female reader.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-07 13:01

The New York Times Magazine is launching a new design on March 6, according to a press release from the New York Times Company. A preview of the new design is available on its website.

Making a marked change, the magazine plans on adding new features, new columnists, and some contributions from the newsroom staff of the New York Times. The magazine's site now hosts a blog. The articles will also provide staffers' emails and editors' credits, according to Adweek.

Among the new features will be a regular column written by Times executive editor Bill Keller. Along with columns by already known writers, the magazine will include columns by newer voices. One of these columns is "You Are Here," a look on the differences of life in different parts of the world.

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-04 13:35

The New York Times is to undertake a "reinvention" of its Week in Review, a memo to staff explained. It will be the "creation of an entirely new section," rather than just a new look or new layout for the paper's well-known Sunday analysis and opinion section, the memo from executive editor Bill Keller and editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal.

The planned overhauled section was described by the memo as, "a Sunday commentary section that will feature the rich menu of the best Op-Ed columnists around; our Editorials; some fine analysis and observation from our best writers in the newsroom; the best outside opinion writing (more like the classical Op-Ed pieces); a much expanded and enhanced readers' section (Letters to the Editor on steroids in the 21st century), as well as new kinds of features and new voices and ideas."

The project will involve staff from both the newsroom and the editorial department, but the memo stressed that the new section will not "relax the important distinction between news and opinion." Some reporters and correspondents will write rich analytical pieces on their beats, but these pieces will not be confused with pure opinion articles.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-21 12:37

Gawker Media has redesigned its pack of websites with the intention of looking more like newsmagazines and less like blogs, a move that was first announced late last year. The changes implemented on the homepages leave more space for one prominent story, plus a couple of others, with other posts appearing in a stream down the right hand side. The new look is not popular with everyone, it seems.

"This allows us to display big, gorgeous images and videos on the front page of our site," said editor Remy Stern in a post on Gawker.com about the redesign, "and it allows readers to easily scan headlines without having to scroll down the entire page."

Gawker Media founder Nick Denton told the Wall Street Journal in November that he was "bored" with the rigidity of the reverse chronological blog format and the way that the only way to keep a big story, such as Gizmodo's iPhone 4 piece, at the top of the page was to stop publishing for several hours.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-10 13:34

When one thinks of The New Yorker, faded, satirical front-cover illustrations, clever, single-panel black and white cartoons, a sophisticated, cosmopolitan New York City-centered cultural section, articles spanning from national to global politics, and its signature "Irvin" typeface come to mind. More notably, The New Yorker has maintained a relatively constant look throughout its almost 86-year history. But with today's growing popularity of online content consumption, it is interesting to explore how this historic magazine has kept its identity while still evolving its well designed website.

On November 30, 2010, newyorker.com's web editor, Blake Eskin, announced several changes to the site's layout since the last remodeling in 2007, such as the homepage's "rotating set of lead stories", which includes attention-grabbing, mid-sized photos or New Yorker-style drawings, a headline, byline, and a line or two from the article. This layout is effective because it allows for ample space at the top of the site, where one's eyes naturally focus, to include several choices of featured news articles.

Of course, as well as allowing for audio and video offerings, the website gives editors more space to include articles, freeing itself from the constraints of its print version.

Author

Paul Hoffman

Date

2011-01-19 16:02

Fréderic Filloux's Monday Note looked at the problems facing Le Monde as it moves towards a revamp under new ownership. The "iconic" French daily was bought in September 2010 by Pierre Bergé, Xavier Niel and Matthieu Pigasse and president of the paper's management board, Eric Fottorino, was ousted from his position in December due to "differences of opinion" with the new owners.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-01-10 17:47

As more news about the Daily Beast's merger with Newsweek emerges, more and more questions are springing up regarding the editoral changes that will be made to the publications now that the online news-aggregation site and 77-year-old award-winning weekly magazine have joined forces.

Following in the footsteps of other recent mergers like Bloomberg and BusinessWeek, Politico and its newspaper, the Daily Beast and Newsweek will hopefully complement each other and contribute what the other lacks. Though it is unclear how closely the two will work and how much cross-over of content there might be, Tina Brown, the now Editor-in-Chief of both publications said she thinks the merge "is a good model."

So what will the two publications get out of each other? The Guardian says Daily Beast will benefit from Newsweek's pre-established audience and print component which still attracts high advertising revenues. Newsweek, on the other hand, will gain a promising web market - five million unique visitors to be more exact.

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-15 19:25

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