WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Fri - 24.10.2014


readership

Tumblr has been steadily gaining prominence in the world of social media platforms. The site has grown significantly since David Karp founded it in 2007, current boasting almost 15 million blogs. With a reported 45,000 members signing up a day, it's certainly gaining popularity.

Its price tag (free!) and large user base have attracted the attention of media organizations: 160 already use the site. Many popular news sites, such as The New York Times and Huffington Post, launched Tumblr blogs in the middle of last year.

Newsweek's Tumblr, started by Mark Coatney who was senior editor at the time, was among the first media Tumblrs. "I saw it as an opportunity to talk to our audience in a new way," he said to the New York Times. Tumblr decided to hire him in August of last year to help media organizations use the site to its fullest potential.

The Editors Weblog spoke to Coatney about how media organizations could create a successful Tumblr.

Usability

Author

Meghan Hartsell

Date

2011-03-21 16:32

"Newspapers are proving so resilient that the term "dying newspaper industry" will be retired in the next year or two", the Toronto Star announced, quoted by the Guardian's Roy Greenslade. The newspapers referred to are those in Canada, which seems, as Greenslade notes, to become a sort of last refuge for printed newspapers.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-02-14 14:19

Events in Egypt and the wider Middle East last week constituted the biggest international story in the US in the past four years, according to Pew's Project for Excellence in Journalism News Coverage Index. Making up 56% of the 'newshole,' turmoil in the Middle East was "easily" the biggest overseas story in a week since Pew started the index in January 2007, and was in fact the fourth biggest story of any kind, behind the 2008 presidential election campaign and last month's Tucson shooting.

The Middle East story was most prominent on cable news, where it accounted for 76% of coverage, but even in newspapers it made up 44% of news and online just over half, at 51%. The blizzard in the American Midwest was the second biggest story, but this only attracted 8% of coverage.

Until now, the biggest international story of any single week was the Iraq war in September 2007, at 43%, followed by the earthquake in Haiti in 2010 with 41%.

Why has the Egyptian unrest, an "event that has not involved U.S. troops or directly imperiled U.S. citizens" generated significantly more attention than the country's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan? PEJ's explanation is that there have been a huge number of cameras and journalists on the ground, and that the media themselves became part of the story as journalists suffered attacks and harassment, as well as the political implications of the situation for the US.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2011-02-09 13:54

Could video be a solution for increasing web traffic? Apparently so, according to Poynter, which cites The Miami Herald as the example for how a newspaper can use digital video to the advantage of driving web traffic, which in turn drives viewers to the paper's website, which in turn could lead to generating more revenue. Last year The Herald saw a 25-percent increase in video traffic, second to traffic behind articles.

Video may seem tangential to newspapers, but in the Internet age it is a solution to getting the public's attention and interest as long as the videos are short and direct. This is preferable since not long ago, "some news organizations were beginning to give up on online video. It required significant resources, and it wasn't generating as much revenue or traffic as they had hoped," writes Poynter's Mallary Jean Tenore. But news organizations that have stuck with video "have found that video provides them with a way to advance what they're already doing well, increase time on site, and engage users in ways that traditional narratives can't."

Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-03 11:05

The number of monthly unique users on Metro.co.uk should hit five million by the end of the year, the daily commuter title pledged as part of a set of targets outlined today, Journalism.co.uk reported.

According to figures presented by Metro, the site had 3.5 million unique monthly browsers on average in November 2010, compared to around one million in November 2009.

Although this figure is low compared to the numbers at the websites major UK dailies, it is interesting that the freesheet's traffic is increasing even in an arena where most competitors' sites are also free.

The article quoted Rich Mead, Metro's assistant managing director, who said this is just the starting point.

As Guardian's Roy Greenslade noted, Metro is far and away Britain's most successful national newspaper: over the past year its distribution has increased as well as its advertising volume and revenue.

Associated Newspapers, the paper's publisher, would not share individual publications' figures, but the Metro team claimed 2010 was Metro's best year.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-01-26 18:34

In the New York Times, Brian Stelter tried to take the stock of the US news coverage of the Afghan. "As the Obama administration conducted an Afghanistan-Pakistan strategy review this month, the news media did too, and the coverage came peppered with question marks", he said.

He cited the ABC News series of segments titled "Afghanistan: Can We Win?", the special report "Can This War Be Won?" of CBS Evening News by Katie Couric and a recent New York magazine headline questioning "Why Are We in Afghanistan?"

"The questions reflect the complex nature of the Afghan war, and of the news coverage", he argued.

The Project for Excellence in Journalism, of the Pew Research Center, cited in the Stelter's article, produces every week a News Coverage Index, analyzing which news dominate the week.

Author

Federica Cherubini's picture

Federica Cherubini

Date

2010-12-21 14:29

Forbes is planning to involve its readers more in both the print and digital versions of its magazine. Lewis DVorkin, chief product officer of Forbes Media, recently wrote about how "At Forbes, we're beginning to open up our print and digital platforms so many more knowledgeable and credible content creators can provide information and perspective and connect with one another," he said.

He noted that with the launch of this year's Forbes 400, reader content began to appear in the pages of the magazine. "What was yesterday's audience is today's cadre of potential experts who can report what they know or filter information for distribution to friends who trust their judgments," he wrote.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-05 14:02

Figures on readership behind the Times and Sunday Times digital paywalls have finally been released. 105,000 people have made some digital purchase, and about half of these are monthly subscribers to one of the digital editions: the websites or the Times iPad app or Kindle edition. "Many of the rest" said the press release "are either single copy or pay-as-you-go customers."

100,000 more print subscribers have activated their digital accounts either to the websites and/or iPad apps and the press release therefore concludes that the total paid digital audience is "close to 200,000." James Murdoch, News Corp's chairman and CEO for Europe and Asia said that this means that the "total paid circulation of The Times has grown."

The two papers went behind an online paywall in July, and introduced a subscription-based iPad app. Online access costs £1 a day or £2 a week, and the iPad app costs £9.99 a month. It is a straightforward, complete paywall, compared to metered models which are more flexible.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-02 13:29

Although no official numbers have been released by Times and Sunday Times owner News International, audience research company Nielsen has estimated that an average of 362,000 UK web users went behind the papers' paywalls between July and September, reported the Guardian.

Nielsen estimates that 1.78 million monthly unique visitors from the UK went to the two papers' homepages, meaning that of these, just over one-fifth are going on to access subscription content, the Guardian added. In the three months until June 2010, the traffic to the Times Online site, predecessor to TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk, was just over 3 million.

Print subscribers for the Times and Sunday Times have free access to the websites: the Times has 107,000 subscribers and the Sunday Times 112,000, the Guardian noted. So it is unclear how many people are paying for an online subscription only.

The numbers do suggest, however, that traffic going through to individual stories has fallen by just over 88% since the paywall was implemented. This is in line with previous reports of News International's expectations.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-10-27 19:16

According to a new Nielsen study, news takes the cake as the most popularly viewed type of content on the iPad, Poynter reports. The study, called "Internet Connected Devices," shows that news is the top content category, with 44 percent of iPad users viewing news regularly. Music comes in second, with 41 percent of users consuming on a regular basis.

But even with the boom of the iPad, the study found that more people still access news from their iPhones. Although iPhone news junkies fall two percent behind music consumers, 51 percent of users read the news on their phone.

Smartphones may be the most accessible and portable means of scoping out news, but PoynterOnline says that in this case, quantity is not necessarily quality. Seventy-eight percent of iPhone users spend less than 15 minutes per session reading the news, compared to iPad users, where more than half spend 16 minutes or more.

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-25 11:15

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Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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