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A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Tue - 23.01.2018


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The new competitors for newspapers are not Google, Facebook and Twitter. “The competition is not telling good stories,” says Juan Señor, Partner at Innovation Media Consulting, who wrapped up WAN-IFRA's Publish Asia conference with some insights into the future of the newspaper business.

“Good journalism is good business” is the motto of Innovation, and content-driven innovation is the way to success, he said. But some newspapers are blinded by the latest technology.

“We see lots of companies inject digital Botox into products that have become moribund,” he says.

Mr Señor urged newspaper companies to have confidence in print. “We have to stop talking about the death of print,” he said. “It’s never happened in human history. No medium has ever replaced another medium, but the medium will change."

How will they change? Newspapers in print will become a premium product, more magazine-like, while mobile and tablets will become the mass media.

Here is some of his advice for newspaper companies:

- Editors are important to help people navigate through information overload. “People are looking for editors to cut the blog fog,” he says.

- Journalists should become “journanalysts”, “a journalist really worth reading and paying for.”

Author

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-04-13 10:28

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Sunday is not a day of rest when it comes to newspaper sales in the US. The newly published annual Pew report on the state of the American media has highlighted that despite the problems that print newspapers are facing in the US, Sunday print editions are continuing to do relatively well. Sunday circulation has stabilised and has even gone up at some papers. What’s more, Pew writes that as print ad revenues plummet, Sunday preprint insert advertising has proved comparatively resilient.

Presumably to capitalise on this trend, the Wall Street Journal has established a partnership with 62 local papers, which each weekend publish between two and four pages of content about business and personal finance produced by WSJ writers. Jeff Roberts writes for paidContent that the articles are not reproduced from the Journal, but written specifically to target a wider, lower-earning audience.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-21 12:00

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A new study from the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future states that the majority of newspapers in the USA will cease to exist in printed form within the next five years. The report asked whether America had arrived at a "digital turning point" and examined the role of new, often disruptive, digital technologies in American politics, media, communication and the American lifestyle in general.

The report concluded that, as print circulation continues to drop, most newspapers will suffer, causing them to terminate printing operations altogether. Whether publications stand a chance of maintaining printed editions seems to be a question of size; large organisations, such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal and USA Today, could potentially keep their printed editions, whilst local weeklies presumably thanks to their small numbers of staff and dedicated readerships, could also keep their printed editions.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-16 16:18

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The relationship between print and digital is a complex one. 'Digital first' has become a creed for many publications, hoping to ride the wave of technological disruption that has been rippling through the industry for years. Newspapers are obviously proud of their print heritage, but the tendency to put print under the category 'legacy media' doesn't show much faith in it remaining an important medium in years to come.

Yet, despite the often dismissive attitude displayed towards print, many newspapers continue to see the value in their printed product, so much so that they are in fact expanding print operations. Last week The Columbus Dispatch announced it would expand printing operations after Gannett announced it would stop printing in Cincinnati and hand over it's printing obligations to The Dispatch; evidence that while some newspapers are clearly looking to rid themselves of their printing duties, others are growing to take up their roles.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-12-13 15:41

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As Editor of The Independent in the U.K. for 13 years, Simon Kelner oversaw this quality national daily during a period of incredible change in the industry. Although he stepped down from his daily duties as Editor in July, passing the torch to Chris Blackhurst, Kelner's legacy remains.

In 2003 he oversaw the redesign of the paper in compact form, an innovation so successful that other major British dailies followed suit. And last year he presided over the launch of i, a lower-priced digest of stories from The Independent targeted at on-the-go readers.

Kelner is due to speak at the World Editors Forum in Vienna (12-15 October) about i and its success so far.

WAN-IFRA: i was launched last October. Nine months on, how would you rate its success?

KELNER: It's been a tremendous success. The circulation sales followed the normal trajectory of a launch - very high at the start and then slowly came down to a very healthy level. But then we came back at the start of this year with a big advertising campaign and sales have continued to grow ever since then. Now we're selling around about 180,000 a day.

WAN-IFRA: Do you think having smaller, cheaper editions that synthesize the news is something that will catch on with other dailies?

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Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-08-24 13:26

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The Cincinnati Enquirer and The Kentucky Enquirer are to switch to a smaller printed format, announced Gannett.

According to Poynter, the task of printing of the new format will be given to Columbus Dispatch.

In its press release, Gannett stated that that the new format would "provide convenience for consumers" and "new opportunities for advertisers", as the smaller format will contain the same amount of news content with a larger number of pages, allowing for better display of both content and advertising material.

Other papers have had success with the smaller format, including several British dailies such as i as well as The Times and Sunday Times. Will Gannett reap the advantages of a more compact printed edition?

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-18 17:10

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"Print is the new vinyl".

You are probably aware of the commotion on twitter created by John Bracken's simple assertion at the Asian American Journalists Association conference on 11th August.

If you missed it, here's a catch up.

Behind the reams of vaguely entertaining hipster analogies lies a serious question: IS print the new vinyl?

Bracken elaborated on exactly what he meant by this metaphor on The Knight Foundation Blog. In his explanation, he emphasised the value of the tactile object in a world where digitisation makes the acquisition of both music and information a rather intangible experience.

As Bracken cites, vinyl was the fastest growing music medium in 2010. Why? Essentially, because purchasing and consequently possessing a physical object is an entirely different consumer experience. This is why, after a long period of disinterest, consumers are increasingly investing in vinyl alongside other mediums, mainly digital.

So, can print really follow in the footsteps of vinyl? Is it realistic to expect print publications to be able to soldier on through declining sales in the hope of gaining popularity in the future?

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-18 14:01

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It is fitting that this year's World Newspaper Week is taking place in Austria, where the dynamic publishing market has only slightly shrunk in the past few years compared to that of other hit-hard Western countries.

Alexandra Föderl-Schmid is Editor-in-Chief of Der Standard, and under her direction the paper has continued to do well despite the global downturn in print sales. She started freelancing for the paper in 1990 and held many posts there including Germany correspondent, EU correspondent and chief business editor before being appointed to the top job in 2007.

Föderl-Schmid is due to speak at the World Editors Forum in Vienna (12-15 October) about what content print newspapers should focus on to not just survive but also thrive.

WAN-IFRA: Lots of successful printed papers and magazines are focusing on niche markets (like finance) and opinion pieces. Are the days when printed papers were a medium for breaking news and general news pieces in the past?

FÖDERL-SCHMID: The function of daily newspapers has changed because the ways of sharing breaking news have multiplied. As a consequence, printed newspapers have become more important as a medium for explaining the news: background, analysis, critique and artwork are becoming more and more crucial. It's the news behind the news.

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Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-08-17 19:04

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Does news need to be constant?

It seems impossible, in the era of the 24 hour news channel and portable internet, that we should even consider going without a daily update on the news that matters to us.

However, it seems that one French paper has decided to deliberately take a step back from this constant news production line and do something rather unorthodox: take a holiday (in print, at least).

As Le Monde reported, the French daily La Tribune, which specialises in finance and business news, the paper announced on 5 August that there would be no paper editions during the following two weeks, which coincide with the French summer holiday period, when many city dwellers head for the country.

It is very common for French papers to reduce their paper formats during the summer period: Le Monde and Le Figaro are just over half their usual size during the summer period and free papers cease distribution completely.

Despite this annual trend, it is still highly unusual for a renowned paper with a purchase cost to stop printing.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-17 12:39

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It's a new world out there in UK print media.

According to The Audit Bureau of Circulations, it seems that shortened editions of newspapers could be a good idea, as for the first time ever i's circulation has topped that of The Independent.

What's more, since The News of the World phone-hacking scandal hit News International, things have changed in the circulation game.

OK, so things aren't entirely different - News International is still pretty powerful and print editions are still suffering from an incremental year-on-year drop in circulation, causing ever more anxiety about the fate of the industry - but despite this, the media landscape of Britain does seem to be changing.

According to figures from Mediatel, Associated Newspapers now has the greatest market share of any publishing group. However, the margin is a close one, as in July Associated Newspapers held a market share of 29.95% while News International had 28.76%, as reported by The Press Gazette.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-08-16 13:30

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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