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A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Tue - 23.01.2018


plagiarism

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The Texas Observer reported last week on Mexico’s Blog Del Narco, saying it fills the void of journalists unable to report on the daily horrors of violence in Mexico.  Launched in March 2010, Blog Del Narco documents the violence with gory videos, photos, and articles uploaded anonymously to protect its submitters. The Texas Observer reports that within months, the site gained 3 million visitors a month.

Yet the Observer, in partnership with The Guardian, admits “it was unclear whether the stories were ripped from other websites or were original reporting. And it seemed like no moderator existed.”

Now Fronteras Desk, a multimedia platform reporting on the U.S. southwest and along the US-Mexico border, suggests Blog Del Narco has plagiarized from news publications in Mexico. In a close examination, Fronteras' reporter Michel Marizco shows Blog Del Narco has used some articles word-for-word from several major newspapers in Mexico.

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Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-15 14:39

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Globe and Mail columnist Margaret Wente is facing charges of plagiarism, and the Canadian newspaper has been accused of mishandling the situation. Here are some CliffsNotes (or Coles Notes if you're Canadian) on the scandal thus far, organised using social curation tool Storify.

[View the story "The Margaret Wente plagiarism scandal" on Storify]

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-25 19:02

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When Washington Post blogger Elizabeth Flock resigned from her position after making her second aggregation error in four months on blogPost, the Post’s breaking news blog, ombudsman Patrick Pexton wrote an opinion piece asserting that the paper had failed Flock as a young journalist; soon after Pexton’s column was published, a wave of criticism and concerns about the dangers of blogging surfaced, Poynter reported.  

According to Pexton’s article, Flock was often the only reporter writing for blogPost, writing an average of 5.9 posts per day on a wide array of topics. The blog was meant to achieve 1-2 million views per month, the article said.

Flock’s first error, which earned her a strongly-worded editor’s note criticizing her actions, was in reporting a viral but false story that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney had used a slogan favored by the Ku Klux Klan in one of his speeches—without calling the campaign to confirm before publishing, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-24 17:27

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"Thou shalt not plagarise". This phrase surely must be somewhere near the top of the ten commandments of journalism.

Hence in 2005, when David Simpson, then-cartoonist for The Tulsa World, was found to have redrawn somebody else's work, the paper's publisher Robert E. Lorton III dismissed him, saying he had committed "the cardinal sin of a newsroom". The story was reported at the time by the AP and picked up by Sign On San Diego.

Still, there's no peace for the wicked; history has repeated itself. After his dismissal from The Tulsa World, Simpson was hired by the Urban Tulsa Weekly but, as Poynter reports, he was fired yesterday for further instances of copying other people's work.

And Simpson's not the only news professional recently brought up for plagiarism. Another Poynter article published on Monday points out that a journalist from the Journal Register Company's Middletown Press was found to have plagiarised "significant portions" of an article about a man charged with disorderly conduct from a local Patch website.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/11/sharing_not_stealing_issues_of_plagiaris.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-02 19:22

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Since its advent, the Internet has blurred the lines between copyrighted and free content. Publishers are frustrated with the seeming inability to keep material under control, and commentators are increasingly careful about sourcing material in order to stay on the right side of copyright and plagiarism cases.

One such case earlier this week ruled that reposting an article in its entirety, even without the owner's authority, was fair use of the work. In this particular instance, Righthaven, a company specializing in copyright litigation, sued Wayne Hoehn, a user of the site medjacksports.com, for posting an article to prompt discussion. Righthaven argued that posting the article reduced the number of hits the Review-Journal site would have received.

After citing the fair use clause as he ruled in favor of Hoehn, the judge explained that he found the posting to be for non-commercial purposes. He added that Righthaven did not have enough of a stake in the dispute to entitle it to bring the case to court.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/06/copyrighted_material_fair_and_unfair_use.php

Author

Florence Pichon

Date

2011-06-22 14:10

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Earlier last week, the staff of The Arizona Republic discovered some similarities between some of The Republic's articles and others appearing in The Washington Post.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/03/the_washington_post_suspended_one_of_its.php

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-03-17 16:44

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