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A publication of the World Editors Forum

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Fri - 22.09.2017


photojournalism

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The winner of the World Press Photo of the Year 2012 is a picture by Paul Hansen of Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter. The image (above) shows a group of men in Gaza City carrying the bodies of two children, two-year-old Suhaib Hijazi and his older brother Muhammad, who were killed when their house was hit during a missile strike, according to information from World Press Photo. The father of the boys was also killed in the strike, and his body is being carried by a group of men behind those carrying his sons. The bodies are being carried to a mosque for a burial ceremony. The photograph was taken on 20 November 2012 in Gaza City.

“The strength of the picture lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget,” said jury member Mayu Mohanna of Peru, in a statement accompanying the announcement of the awards on Friday.

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Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2013-02-18 18:54

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“Get the wider story”, says the new photography iPad app that Reuters launched last week.

Aiming to re-imagine the way news photography can engage its audience on a multimedia platform, The Wider Image app offers the public a selection of the best photos gathered by the news agency's vast network of photographers around the world.

The Wider Image takes advantage of new storytelling possibilities on the iPad.

Stories are a swirl of photos, narrative slideshows, interactive sequences, testmonies by photographers, expanded fact boxes and data charts and locations viewed on a world map. The Wider Image has been launched with over 100 stories and 50 in-depth photographer profiles, with more to be added regularly.

Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-10-25 17:11

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South African newspaper the Citizen has admitted that it made a mistake by publishing a manipulated photograph on the front page of its Wednesday edition, after the cover elicited strong reactions from journalists about the ethics of editing news images.

The photograph, supplied by news agency Agence-France Presse (AFP), was taken after a suicide attack killed 12 people, including eight South African aviation workers, in Kabul, Afghanistan on September 18. In the original image, two bodies lie beside the charred skeleton of a minibus that was blown up in the attack. In the version that was published, the bodies have been digitally wiped from the picture.

The Citizen released a statement on Thursday, explaining that during an editorial meeting on Tuesday, the photograph was deemed too graphic to publish in its natural state, and a decision was taken to blur the bodies. Instead, they were “digitally cloned out of the photo,” apparently inadvertantly. “The photo should never have been published in that form,” said the Citizen’s Editor Martin Williams. “We regret this and are taking steps to ensure that it does not happen again,” continued the statement.

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Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-21 17:48

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If you thought photo-sharing app Instagram was little more than a platform for rich kids to post photos of their luxury yachts, think again. Journalists and news organisations are increasingly using the social networking application, bought for $1 billion in April of this year by Facebook, as a tool for reporting on news and events.

NPR, NBC, The New York TimesThe New YorkerWSJ and The Washington Post are just some of the major news outlets that are seeking to harness the opportunities provided by Instagram’s blend of social interaction and content creation. Only last week photojournalists covering the 2012 presidential election for the AP were asked by the organisation to use their personal Instagram feeds in a professional capacity:#aponthetrail is designed to give the public an intimate insight into elements of the U.S presidential campaign that often go unreported.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-04 18:34

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On Wednesday, The Los Angeles Times published graphic photographs of US soldiers posing with corpses and body parts of suicide bombers in Afghanistan, spurring a criminal investigation and condemnation of the activities by US government officials. The unsolicited photos, taken two years ago, were given to The Times by an anonymous soldier who said the photos demonstrated “a breakdown in leadership and discipline that he believed compromised the safety of the troops,” the article said.

After being shown the photos before publication, however, Pentagon officials such as Defense Secretary Leon Panetta asked The Times not to publish the images, citing the potential risk of inciting violence against US troops by forces in Afghanistan, Poynter reported.  

Ultimately, The Times editorial staff decided publishing the pictures was in the public interest, though the paper delayed publication as per request to allow the military time to increase protections for the soldiers shown in the photos, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-19 18:15

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With the rapid rise in popularity of the virtual pinboard Pinterest, newsrooms have been experimenting with ways to use the new platform to share their original content, according to Mediabistro’s 10,000 Words blog. Mediabistro examines how The Wall Street Journal and various other news outlets have been using Pinterest as a journalism tool.

The Pinterest platform consists of user-posted “pins,” or added images, which other users can then “like,” comment on, or “repin” to their own Pinterest account, according to the Pinterest website.

“Our goal is to connect everyone in the world through the 'things' they find interesting,” the website said. “With millions of new pins added every week, Pinterest is connecting people all over the world based on shared tastes and interests.”

Popular topics include style, home decorating, cooking and inspirational photos and quotes. Users can also create pinning “boards” focused on a specific topic.

Author

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-27 14:14

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The World Press Photo Contest announced on 10 February that a picture by Spanish photographer Samuel Aranda has been named as the World Press Photo of the Year 2011.

The photograph shows a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011. Aranda was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times.

A posting on the The New York Times "Lens" blog by Kerri MacDonald and David Furst, notes that the photograph is one of the first Aranda filed from Yemen, and quotes him as saying: "I got back to my place, and I saw the photo in the screen and I was like 'Wow'. The woman is not just crying. It was something more. You can feel that the woman is really strong".

"The photo is the result of a very human moment", said Juror Manoocher Deghati, "but it also reminds us of something important, that women played a crucial part in this revolution. It is easy to portray the aggressiveness of situations like these. This image shows the tenderness that can exist within all the aggression. The violence is still there, but it shows another side".

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2012/02/world_press_photo_of_the_year_announced.php

Author

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-02-13 19:37

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Many of the camps have been cleared. So what's next for Occupy Wall Street movement? And what's next for its press coverage?

This is a questions that New York Times journalist David Carr posed in a column on Sunday, where he considered whether the Occupy movement would "continue to keep its hold on the collective media imagination?" "Probably not," he reasoned: "when the spectacle disappears reporters often fold up their tents as well".

Carr ends by qualifying his argument, saying that the mark left by the Occupy Wall Street protestors might be visible in the debate leading up to the 2012 presidential election. Yet the thrust of the piece remains: the first, active phase of the movement is over.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2011/11/where_do_we_go_from_here_press_coverage.php

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2011-11-22 19:35

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Occupy Wall Street: the American protest movement that seemed to have sprung from nowhere and may have been going nowhere - or so many people thought until Saturday October 1, when protesters marched across the Brooklyn Bridge in New York City and 700 people were arrested.

Simply look at the events calendar on the movement's website and you will see that its members have a broad range of political goals and, consequently, the actions backed by Occupy Wall Street range from everything including 'slut walks' to anti-nuclear demonstrations. What their members all have in common is that they are "the 99% that will no longer tolerate the greed and corruption of the 1%" Inspired by uprisings in the Arab World, this "leaderless resistance movement" has provided another example of how social media can create mass mobilization.

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WEF ID: 
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web_20/2011/10/occupy_wall_streetoccupy_wall_street.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-10-04 18:32

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