WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


phone-hacking scandal

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Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of the phone-hacking scandal that engulfed the News of the World last year, will be forced to reveal the name of the journalist who directed him to intercept phone messages. In a unanimous decision, five supreme court judges today ruled that Mulcaire must pass on information about how hacking targets were chosen and who his contacts at the paper were to the legal team representing Nicola Philips. Philips, a victim of phone-hacking was an assistant to publicist Max Clifford and is currently pursuing a claim for damages.

The decision puts an end to Mulcaire’s 20 month fight to avoid disclosing the potentially discriminating information. Mulcaire’s previous attempts to protect himself from requests to reveal details of his links with News of the World reporters had been ruled against by both the high court and the court of appeal. Mulcaire had attempted to invoke privilege against self-incrimination to avoid disclosing any details that "expose him to prosecution." When delivering today’s ruling Judge Lord Walker said: "The supreme court unanimously dismisses Mr Mulcaire's appeal. Section 72 of the [Senior Courts Act] excludes his privilege against self-incrimination: the proceedings brought by Ms Phillips are 'proceedings for … rights pertaining to …intellectual property' and the conspiracy proceedings to which Mr Mulcaire would expose himself on disclosure of the information amount to a 'related offence'."

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-04 18:43

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How have government-media relations changed after the arrival of WikiLeaks and the scandal at the News of the World, wondered panellists at a WPFC and UNESCO-organised conference in Paris last week, The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World.

Henrikas Yushkiavitshus, the former UNESCO Assistant Director General for Communication and Information and former Vice-Chairman of Gostel Radio in Moscow, opened the session on government-media relations by reminding the audience that the relationship between media and goverments has always been fraught, since well before the birth of Wikileaks as a phenomenon. Governments, he said in his opening remarks, will not always cooperate with the media. The situation is complicated by the public perception of the media, which cannot be counted on to be favourable. Indeed in the United States, public trust in the media stood at 46% in 2008, 2 points below public trust in the government, and that figure continued to drop over the following two years.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2012/02/government-media_relations_after_wikilea.php

Author

William Granger

Date

2012-02-20 11:29

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What do phone-hacking at the News of the World and Wikileaks have in common from an ethical point of view?

UNESCO's conference "The media world after Wikileaks and News of the World", held in Paris on 16 February addressed this question in its second panel debate about "Professionalism and Ethics in the New Media Environment".

Borja Bergareche, author of the book "Wikileaks confidencial" and London correspondent for the Spanish paper ABC, argued that the connection between the two is that they both involve distrust of the press.
Both cases raised issues about media and ethics and law and put journalistic standards in the spotlight: the News of the World scandal has led to intense scrutiny of journalistic practices, while Wikileaks raised questions about how journalists deal with a huge amount of information.

If there is one industry in which acting professionally has ethical implications, it's journalism, said Bergareche. When it comes to journalistic standards and to dealing with huge amounts of raw data and information, for example the US embassy cables, questions need to be asked about the nature of WikiLeaks.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2012-02-16 19:09

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How has WikiLeaks affected professional media? What does it mean for journalistic techniques? Representatives from three news organisations who have worked with WikiLeaks, plus two authors of books on the controversial whistle-blowing platform, discussed these issues today at The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, a conference organized by the World Press Freedom Committee and UNESCO in Paris.

The original "great idea" behind WikiLeaks: to create a safe haven for whistleblowers, is "excellent and powerful," said Le Monde's former editor, Sylvie Kauffmann, but it has only partially succeeded in its goals. The haven wasn't completely safe - someone is in jail - and there hasn't been a flood of new big leaks.

"People imagined that WikiLeaks was going to cause an information revolution," said the Guardian's investigations editor David Leigh, and this didn't happen, but it did show that there is a new information landscape. As The New York Times' associate managing editor Ian Fisher commented, "in terms of scale and speed of information, WikiLeaks has had an impact, and there's no going back."

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2012/02/the_impact_of_wikileaks_on_professional.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-16 16:29

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The arrests of five Sun journalists over alleged corrupt payments made to police and public officials have prompted angry responses from sections of the UK press and from the National Union of Journalists.

Sun deputy editor Geoff Webster, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker, picture editor John Edwards and deputy news editor John Sturgis were arrested early on Saturday morning and later released on bail.

Trevor Kavanagh at The Sun condemned the arrests in an article today, beginning "The Sun is not a 'swamp' that needs draining". He protested that the paper's journalists are being "treated like members of an organised crime gang" who are "subjects of the biggest police operation in British criminal history".

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-02-14 10:36

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Newspapers in the UK commissioned private detectives to hack email accounts as well as phones, it emerged yesterday. The Independent reported that police have uncovered evidence that Gordon Brown's emails were accessed illegally during his time as Chancellor of the Exchequer, as well as those of a former Labour adviser Derek Draper.

"Several Fleet Street titles" may have commissioned private detectives to access emails of as many victims as those involved in the phone-hacking scandal, the Independent said. Peter Hain, former Northern Ireland secretary, has confirmed that he has been in discussions with police concerning hacking of his emails.
Labour MP Tom Watson has called for London's Metropolitan Police to expand its investigation into possible computer hacking, known as Operation Tuleta. Currently eight police officers are working on the email-hacking investigation, while the Operation Weeting team investigating phone-hacking is 120-strong, according to the Independent.

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newsrooms_and_journalism/2012/01/hacking_by_private_investigators_extends.php

Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-01-03 17:09

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Journalism these days... what's it coming to? It's a question that everybody wants an answer to. Disregarding the painful question of how the press will survive financially in the digital age, the debate surrounding what constitutes journalism is in constant motion.

As Dan Rather outlined when he collected the Committee to Protect Journalists Burton Benjamin Memorial Award 2011 on November 22, many people feel that journalism has lost its way somewhat. With the ongoing revelations at the Leveson Inquiry relating to bad practice in the British press, it seems that journalism may be undergoing something of an identity crisis. What is it? What do journalists do? What's the point of it all?!

Of course, there is a commonly discussed divide between 'good' journalism and 'bad' journalism. In fact, author JK Rowling suggested in her testimony to the Leveson Inquiry that a separate term should exist to distinguish one type of journalism from another. "Good" journalism abides by an ethical code and chases stories that are meaningful to the public; investigative journalism would fall into this category. 'Bad' journalism would be the opposite of this practice, something that is often identified within the tabloid press.

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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-29 18:54

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Today the Leveson Inquiry has heard more revelations regarding the behaviour of the British tabloid press.

To summarise, witnesses today included Christopher Jefferies, who was falsely accused and vilified by the media as the killer of Joanna Yates; Ian Hurst, a former British army intelligence officer whose computers was allegedly hacked by the News of the World in order to obtain details of an IRA informer; Jane Winter, a peace and human rights campaigner in Ireland; Anne Diamond, a former television presenter; and Charlotte Church, a singer who was thrust into the limelight at a very young age. You can read coverage of the whole thing here.

Jeffries related that he felt as if he were under "house arrest" after his arrest by police and that he had to stay with numerous friends to avoid media scrutiny, feeling "rather as if I was a recusant priest at the time of the Reformation, going from safe house to safe house".

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newspaper/2011/11/leveson_inquiry_continues.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-28 19:21

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Today is the final day of hearings for this week. The line-up brought before the inquiry today continued to feature high profile celbrity figures and legal experts. The witnesses were: "HJK", an anonymous member of the public who had a relationship with an unnamed celebrity; Sienna Miller, a British actress; Mark Thomson, a solicitor who has represented Naomi Campbell, Sienna Miller and others in landmark privacy cases; Max Mosley, former head of the FIA, a role which included running Formula One motor racing; and JK Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series.

"HJK"

This witness gave evidence "in camera", away from the press, under an anonymity order.

Sienna Miller

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newspaper/2011/11/phone_hacking_-_day_four_of_core_partici.php

Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-24 18:27

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The Leveson Inquiry in phone-hacking has now heard evidence from core participants for the third consecutive day.

The witnesses who gave testimony today were: Mark Lewis, solicitor for the Dowler family, Sheryl Gascoine, the former wife of Paul Gascoine, a former Daily Telegraph journalist named Tom Rowland, whose phone was hacked to gain information about his wealthy and famous contacts, along with Gerry and Kate McCann, who have already won libel a case against Express Newspapers for the way in which the press falsely implied the family were involved in death of their daughter.

Mark Lewis

Lewis submitted an addition to his witness statement today, although it has been removed from the Inquiry website.

Lewis is the second core participant to criticize Daily Mail writer Amanda Platell, who accused him of being a "greedy lawyer" and seeking a larger settlement sum, which was not true. Lewis contacted the lawyers at The Daily Mail and the article was removed from the website.

He also spoke in support of the importance of no win, no fee arrangements in bringing libel actions.


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Author

Katherine Travers

Date

2011-11-23 18:55

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