WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 26.10.2014


paywall

Starting at the end of this year, the Times will roll out new subscription plans at different price points. Two cheaper subscription models will be offered: One with topic-based packages, ranging from food to politics, and another that compiles the newspaper’s most important coverage.

The latter package was earlier referred to as “NYT Junior,” Jeff Bercovici of Forbes pointed out, aimed to target what Eliza Kern nicknamed “Generation Mooch.” CEO Mark Thompson said research has shown the market for this type of subscription is “hundreds of thousands,” Capital New York reported.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-26 14:00

"We have to change the perception of the New York Times as not only a place to read about important stories of the day and interesting topics, but also a place to watch,” Denise Warren, executive vice president of NYT’s Digital Products and Services Group, told Journalism.co.uk.

Many of the Times’ videos were already available for free on YouTube and Hulu, an inconsistency that needed to be addressed, Warren told paidContent. And thanks to sponsorship by Acura and Microsoft, videos are now freely accessible on all of the Times’ platforms, including its mobile apps, according to a release.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-04-24 15:19

Woo Hee Chang believes she has the solution to a troubling paradox at the heart of the online news industry. As journalist Tyler Falk discusses in an article (in French) for business and technology website, smartplanet.fr, media businesses want their content to go viral and, of course, they want to monetise it, but more and more have made their content largely inaccessible by putting up paywalls. Some choose to keep a minority of their articles freely accessible, whilst others choose to provide a title and short summary for every article.

But blocking content to non-paying customers, seen now as a financial necessity for many newspapers such as the New York Times, can lead to the "stagnation" of a newspaper's readership. When a paper starts charging for content, many potential new readers steer clear, especially in the case of a brand new publication which has no established reputation or faithful readership willing to pay for continued access to trusted content. This paywall strategy constitutes a "wall" in the very literal sense of the word – it erects a barrier between the newspaper and its potential audience.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-18 17:37

The platform, developed in collaboration with mobile network EE, will "crowdsource content from around the globe by enabling users to share videos, pictures and text directly with the Guardian's editorial team, as well as to browse the contributions submitted by other GuardianWitness users." By facilitating reader participation and influence, the Guardian's new tool reveals their commitment to a model of "open journalism" that has gradually become the core of their identity as a newspaper.

Author

Emily Moore

Date

2013-04-16 16:15

Within a few weeks, four papers have announced paid digital content strategies: the Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Telegraph and the Sun. With online ad revenue not catching up, it comes as little surprise that the majority of papers in developed markets might well charge online readers in the future.

USA Today remains one of the last major US newspapers without a paywall. During a Business Insider conference in December, Publisher Larry Kramer said the paper is not “unique” enough to start charging for content. "There is so much national news out there,” he said. “I think we would lose more than we would gain.”

Another reason for holding off could be because its parent company, Gannett, gets subscription revenue from its 80 local newspapers. The IB Times also notes that USA Today is distributed in hotels and airports across the country.

Author

Briana Seftel

Date

2013-04-02 11:32

The paywall, set to take effect this summer, will allow each visitor 20 complementary page views per month, excluding the home page and classifieds section. The newspaper hopes to maintain most of its 17 million monthly unique visitors.

Such a metered model has proven successful for other newspapers including The New York Times, which Columbia Journalism Review said generates $100 million through digital subscriptions.

In addition to not counting clicks from search engines and social media, the paywall will allow unlimited access from schools, government and military workplaces, notable as more than 20 percent of District of Columbia residents are federal employees, according to Forbes. But Don Graham, chairman and CEO of The Washington Post Co., has previously noted that locals provide less than 10 percent of the newspaper’s online traffic. This statistic made him previously wary of charging for online access, as he predicted that bundling digital subscriptions with print wouldn’t be as successful for The Post as for other papers.

Author

Kira Witkin's picture

Kira Witkin

Date

2013-03-19 14:21

The Washington Post is the latest US paper that is reportedly planning an online paywall in the upcoming year. According to The Wall Street Journal, the Washington-based daily will introduce a metered payment model in the summer of 2013 or later. This comes as the paper tackles a steep decline in its core business of print advertising, the Journal notes.

A Washington Post article adds that “Access to the home page and section fronts would not be limited,” and that home subscribers to the print edition would have full access to the paper’s website and other digital products.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-12-07 19:10

After 80 years in print, the venerable US magazine Newsweek will adopt an entirely digital format from the beginning of 2013, publishing its final print edition on December 31. In an announcement this morning, posted on the website of partner site The Daily Beast, Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown explained:

‘In our judgment, we have reached a tipping point at which we can most efficiently and effectively reach our readers in all-digital format. This was not the case just two years ago. It will increasingly be the case in years ahead.’

According to Newsweek’s most recent publishers statement filed with the Audit Bureau of Circulations, print circulation of the magazine has dropped 51 percent since 2007. Such a decline contrasts with the relative success of its online component, again highlighted in Brown’s statement:

The Daily Beast now attracts more than 15 million unique visitors a month, a 70 percent increase in the past year alone – a healthy portion of this traffic generated each week by Newsweek’s strong original journalism’.

The new digital publication will be called Newsweek Global and will be supported by a paid subscription model. The Daily Beast will remain a separate site.

Author

Frederick Alliott's picture

Frederick Alliott

Date

2012-10-18 17:36

For some former supporters, WikiLeaks pinned the scarlet 'H' of hypocrisy to its gown when founder Julian Assange turned to press freedom foe Rafael Correa of Ecuador for political asylum.

This week, WikiLeaks further alienated some of its allies – including underground hacking collective Anonymous – when the freedom-of-information advocate erected a pop-up window, which many news organisations have described as a ‘paywall’ but it prefers to call a 'blockade,' in the path of visitors to its site.

On the same evening that WikiLeaks uploaded its newest trove of leaked ‘Global Intelligence Files’ regarding the U.S. presidential elections, users visiting the site began bumping into a page illustrated with a wallet and credit cards, and bearing the headline, “In this election, vote with your wallet: Vote WikiLeaks.” To get past the pop-up, users were asked to either share the embedded video on Facebook or Twitter, or to make a donation.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-12 15:33

Tomorrow it will be one year since Piano Media launched Slovakia’s national paywall, and today CEO Tomas Bella announced that the company has secured €2 million in funding from a 3TS Capital Partners' Cisco-backed fund.

For publishers, this means that Piano will be able to offer more analytical tools and data about what works and what doesn’t, better software, and as the company expands into new markets, more countries with which to share know-how and best practices, Bella said.

Bella was not always a fan of the paywall: when he became editor-in-chief at a major Slovakian daily several years ago, he took down the paper’s paywall. But he gradually came to believe that unless papers found a way to charge people online, they would not survive, and he started to think about what the easiest way to charge would be.

Piano Media has launched a simple system for multiple publications with one flat fee and one log-in, which he compared to a cable TV package. You can buy the subscription at any of the participating publishers and you can move between the different sites without logging in. Eleven media outlets are on board in Slovakia, and nine in Slovenia, whose paywalls launched in January 2012.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2012-04-17 18:22

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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