WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 30.10.2014


online video

As Director of Video Transformation at the Associated Press, Sue Brooks has done in depth research into the importance of video to the content offering of news sites. Below she explains how 'stickiness' of video supports paid content strategies, and encourages news publishers to "use video creatively, reinvent the genre," rather than copy broadcasters. The AP Video Hub makes it easy for publishers to download and edit raw footage.

 

Anthony Rose is the co-founder and CTO of Zeebox, a new platform for second-screen social engagement. He explains the concept and discusses how an "explosion of content" will get whittled down to the recommendations of friends.

Hear more from Sue and Anthony at DME13 in April. With thanks to ICM Business Video - our video partners at DME.

Author

Nick Tjaardstra's picture

Nick Tjaardstra

Date

2013-03-02 14:11

Engaging with video journalism on the web is no longer about tilting your laptop screen just so, leaning back with a bowl of crunchy, salty kernels, and perhaps sharing the odd link. Now, with Popcorn Maker 1.0, anyone can remix and add context to videos from YouTube and Vimeo by integrating elements from the web such as Tweets, Google maps and images.

Launched at Mozilla's 'Mozfest' meeting in London last weekend, Popcorn Maker 1.0 is a free, open source web app that requires neither video editing nor coding abilities to operate. By making it dead simple to mash up, augment and share digital video, it holds the potential to change the way journalists, bloggers and the people formerly known as the audience practice and perceive online video journalism, further distinguishing it from the one-directional experience that is television.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-11-13 15:59

The Wall Street Journal’s Deputy Managing Editor, Alan Murray, speaks to Forbes contributor Steven Rosenbaum about tracking the startling growth of WSJ’s live video presence, which reached 28 million streams in August.

Israeli newspaper Maariv "told its more than 2,000 staff on Monday that most of them will be fired by October and that the paper does not have the money to cover the severance pay they have coming if the paper closes, employees said.” Haaretz reports.

Columbia University’s Emily Bell argues that it's time to embrace the growing influence of real-time data on the media business.

The Observer, the Sunday title of UK newspaper The Guardian, is increasing its cover price by 30p starting this week, The Guardian reports.

For more industry news, please see WAN-IFRA's Executive News Service.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-09-11 18:15

In a post on Nieman Lab, Ken Doctor considers whether "newspapers have a shot at stepping ahead of their broadcast rivals as web video evolves."

On Poynter, Mallary Jean Tenore discusses "What Twitter teaches us about writing short & well"

The UK's Press Gazette reports that The Wall Street Journal is hosting a series of events with a tech theme in Shoreditch, East London, for three days from 12 September.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-30 18:08

Today, The Wall Street Journal’s publisher Dow Jones announced the launch of WSJ WorldStream, a “near real-time” video blog that will allow viewers to see the world through the lenses of WSJ reporters’ iPhones.

Hundreds of the newspaper’s journalists have already been trained to double as videographers, according to a memo from Alan Murray, Deputy Managing Editor and Executive Editor of WSJ.com, obtained by Jim Romenesko, in which he announces the platform to staff. Equipped with iPhones, they are instructed to shoot video clips up to 45 seconds in length, and upload them directly to the new WorldStream site. From there, editors will review and post the clips within a tight turnaround.

Once part of “the stream,” the video content can be embedded in text stories, incorporated into live video programming and produced video packages, and watched directly on the mobile-optimized WSJ WorldStream site.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-08-27 18:25

Storyful is, according to Founder and CEO Mark Little, “the first news agency for the social media age:" it sources news content from the "real-time web," authenticates it, and delivers it to an influential roster of clients, including The New York Times and the Economist.

Part tech start-up, part news agency, it is powered by a small team of professional journalists scattered around the globe – from Dublin to San Francisco and Hong Kong – who work as social media “field producers,” using a combination of algorithms and human skill to pick up early warning signals of breaking news, pinpoint sources on the ground, decide which tweets, photos and videos are “actionable,” and feed this verified social content to their publishing partners.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-25 17:43

The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) plans to launch an investigative news YouTube channel in July 2012, according to a press release. Funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the channel will spotlight videos from prominent broadcasters such as NPR, ABC News and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, among other freelance contributors, the release said.

The CIR, a nonprofit organization that produces public interest investigative journalism, will teach reporters working for the channel how to best reach online audiences, the release said. CIR and the Investigative News Network (INN) will also coordinate to try to capture the interest of online users through social media, the release said.

Michael Maness, Knight Foundation Vice President for Media Innovation and Journalism, said in the release, “This collaboration is poised to bring investigative reporting authoritatively onto the social web. We hope it will engage audiences and expand public appetite for visual story telling.”

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-04-12 12:32

With video becoming increasingly important to consumers, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal have each announced they are launching new daily video programmes. The New York Times has launched a new daily business-related programme while The Wall Street Journal has started a new daily lifestyle show.

On 1 February, NetNewsCheck reported that the New York Times has launched a new program called "Business Day Live."

In a related press release, the New York Times stated that "the program is broadcast live from The Times newsroom, and offers the insights and analysis of reporters and columnists from The Times's business, media and technology desks."
It features five rotating hosts, including David Gillen and Winnie O'Kelley, deputy business editors, and reporters Peter Lattman, Catherine Rampell and Louise Story. The Times said the show will run about six minutes at launch, with plans to expand it in the future.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-02-03 13:26

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