WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 17.04.2014


online-only

The Jornal do Brasil, one of the oldest newspapers in the country, will stop publishing its print edition Sept. 1 and will be only available online, the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas reported yesterday.

"The decision to end the print version was taken this week," Nelson Tanure, principal investor of the daily, confirmed to O Globo. Jornal do Brasil informed its readers about the interruption of circulation with a full page ad published today.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-07-15 10:47

British adults are looking to websites for their sports news more than to newspapers, radio, or TV bulletins, reported Press Gazette. ICD Research, which carried out the poll for Press Gazette, found that 247 of the 1,000 surveyed favoured the web "as their preferred source of sporting news and comment."

National newspapers were the primary source of sporting news for just 14% of respondents, and local newspapers for only 2.4%. When looking at specific preferred sources, BBC TV was a clear winner, with 25.9% identifying it as their favourite, followed by 15.3% choosing the BBC's website. Only three newspapers: the Daily Mail, Sun and Daily Telegraph made it into the top 10.

For something as visual and fast moving as sports, it is not surprising that BBC TV came high on respondents' list of sources. The increasing popularity of websites is likely due to their video and live blogging capabilities, allowing the public to interact far more thoroughly and immediately with the sports being covered than via a print publication. Some newspapers outside the UK however, such as readership record-breaking La Gazzetta dello Sport in Italy and L'Équipe in France, are extremely popular.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-30 19:34

Dubai's English-language daily Emirates Business 24/7 plans to shut down its print edition and convert to an electronic-only newspaper in mid-July, GulfNews.com reported.

Publications generally close or reduce the days in which their print product appears due to financial reasons; however, the order to shutter the print version completely and go online-only comes from orders issued by Sheikh Maktoum bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, deputy ruler of Dubai and Board Chairman of Dubai Media Incorporated (DMI). Financial reasons were not given.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-06-24 11:10

It has been six months since online-only nonprofit investigative journalism outfit, Texas Tribune, launched in Texas. Following in the steps of ProPublica, Texas Tribune aimed to fill in the gaps left by newspapers in investigative journalism, and moved to smash through readership targets early this year.

In March, Texas Tribune's editor-in-chief, Evan Smith, reported that the website had received over 1 million monthly page views for that month.

This week, Evan Smith wrote about what the company had learned during the past six months to celebrate Texas Tribune's 6-month anniversary, and revealed a series of encouraging "six-month stats" for the viability of nonprofit news organizations.

Although Texas Tribune's success has exposed the importance of social media sites in distribution as well as the journalistic power of data, Smith writes that "in some ways the most interesting and revealing takeaway has been the information we've gleaned about the size of our audience, where they come from, what areas of the site they go to and for how long, etc."

So, how has Texas Tribune fared in the last six months? Very well, it seems.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-05-12 13:49

The New York Observer has launched a trial incentive programme for reporters, the Awl reported, offering bonuses to staff for web popularity and web traffic. The scheme was announced last Wednesday via a memo at a staff meeting.

In May, June and July, a first place award of $500 and second place of $300 will be offered in each category - pageviews, number of posts, new Twitter followers, number of comments, and external pickups. Each employee can win a total of $2500, the Awl specified.

Tips for winning in each category were offered, including using Google Trends, Twitter and other tools to find out what's popular on the web, using social media to promote stories, writing blog posts to provide extra commentary, and by ending with 'conversation starters.'

Is offering such financial incentives to staff a wise idea? Encouraging reporters to make an effort to promote their work undoubtedly makes sense, but the idea that journalists might feel pressured to write just about subjects that they believe readers will want to read is worrying, as it might lead to more celebrity coverage rather than hard-hitting stories. Pushing them to write multiple posts could also lead to a drop in quality in each story.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-05-05 19:06

The founder of virtual marketplace eBay is stepping into the news business, aiming to launch a news site that will do what other news publishers are struggling with: getting people to pay for news, The Associated Press reported today.

Honolulu-based billionaire Pierre Omidyar will launch a news site called "Honolulu Civil Beat," which will be home to community news in Hawaii. Users will be required to pay to discuss issues, ideas and exchange information about matters affecting their communities. Civilbeat.com goes live today with an official launch scheduled for May 4, and plans to charge US$19.99 for monthly membership.

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-04-22 11:18

Sree Sreenivasan, a contributing editor to NYC's local news site, DNAinfo, recently informed readers about the insights he gleaned from a week of vacation in which he involuntarily went without access to any sort of daily print publications. Sreenivasan's recent bout of "withdrawal," as he labeled it, may come as a surprise to some particularly considering his area of expertise.

Not only does Sreenivasan work as DNAinfo's "technology expert" responsible for "explaining trends and demystifying...technology," and in 2009 he was featured in AdAge as among "one of 25 media people to follow on Twitter." One would think such a highly recognized figure in the digital world might have abandoned newspapers the moment news became widely accessible on smart phones?

It turns out, however that Sreenivasan is somewhat of a contradiction to the digital follower image. In his article, Sreenivasan admits that he still carries a burning torch for print publications. He writes, "I am a newspaper and magazine guy at heart. I believe there's still something magical about print."

Author

Robert Eisenhart

Date

2010-04-01 16:01

When online-only non-profit Texas Tribune launched back in November, it made its raison d'etre very clear - to fill a gap in quality local journalism in Texas.

Alongside this admirable aim, it had another equally ambitious goal that it made no attempts to veil: The Texas Tribune's Editor in Chief, Evan Smith, was after readership, and a high level at that.

Evidently the former goal fulfilled the latter:

Today, Smith himself has reported that since the launch - some 22 weeks ago, the website has smashed through its target of 150,000 unique monthly visitors by the end of 2010, counting an impressive 200,000 monthly unique visits and more than 1 million monthly page views for the month of March.

Smith described the statistics as "well beyond where we had a right to expect we'd be and way, way, way ahead of schedule. Those are amazing stats that make us prouder than you can ever know."

He also used the article to thank employees at the Tribune as well as readers, who make up some of the 8,000 Facebook fans and 5,000 followers on Twitter. He emphasised the website's intentions to continue stepping up online operations, promising; "you ain't seen nothing yet".

Author

Helena Humphrey

Date

2010-03-31 19:21

While many news websites focus on improving their pageviews and unique users, Gawker Media, producer of nine popular news and gossip sites including Gawker and Jezebel, is banking on the readers that keep coming back for more.

As Gawker Media's head of advertising and marketing operations Erin Pettigrew puts it, the company hopes to strengthen its "core readership."

"This core audience -- borne of a compounding of word of mouth, search referrals, article recommendations, and successive enjoyed visits that result in regular readership -- drives our rich site cultures and premium advertising products," she said.

Pettigrew calls these page views "branded traffic," and Gawker measures its branded traffic by looking at the number of searches and page loads directly using words related to the Gawker brand. The company's loyal readers are a force to be reckoned with, amounting to 360 million visits to various Gawker Media sites in 2009 alone.

And Pettigrew believes that, based upon historical trends, this section of readers could continue to grow.

Author

Alexandra Jaffe

Date

2010-03-31 14:40

John Yemma, the editor of The Christian Science Monitor, had some strong words for newspaper websites in an article he wrote for PaidContent: neither paywalls nor multimedia content will save you.

Although Yemma believes that content is king, no news organization has formulated an appropriate response to the problem of losing the value of content on the Internet. Erecting paywalls, like the ones News Corp and the New York Times will in the near future, is just like "sandbagging the tops of levies on the Mississipi," but they are not the answer. Paywalls can't hold the flood back, and the "Internet flood never recedes."
But, it is not multimedia that can hold back the flood either, Yemma claims. Even though users seem to be interested in YouTube videos and interactive games, no one says there will be a great demand for thoughtful interactive content, like graphs on Taliban stronghholds in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Although some media commentators believe in the power of multimedia content, Yemma concludes that "there's no evidence that users love these things so much that they flock to them, stay around, and convert to a news site's brand because of cool multimedia."

The future of newspaper websites for Yemma does not lie in paywalls or multimedia, but in creating relevant content.

Author

Maria Conde

Date

2010-03-30 14:35

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The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


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