WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Thu - 21.08.2014


online-only

Board members of Chilean newspaper La Nacion approved on Friday the closure of the daily's print edition due to circulation decline. The 93-year-old newspaper will be only available online, Milenio reported.

According to media reports, the last print version will circulate on November 28, Efe revealed. However, neither the publishing company nor the government, which owns 69 percent of the newspaper's shares, could confirm the date. "The newspaper will not close," said government spokeswoman Ena Von Baer to Efe. "The government's desire is to keep the newspaper. It has asked the directory that this diary is maintained in a sustainable manner that suits the new time."

For more on this story please see our sister publication www.sfnblog.com

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-16 10:50

Newsweek and The Daily Beast website are to merge in a 50/50 joint venture, called the Newsweek Daily Beast Company, Daily Beast editor Tina Brown announced on her site late last night and the two organisations announced today. Brown will be editor-in-chief of both The Daily Beast, a website that curates aggregated news and produces original reporting and opion and Newsweek, a print weekly.

Brown described the merger between the 77-year-old magazine and two-year old website as "a wonderful new opportunity for all the brilliant editors and writers at The Daily Beast who have worked so hard to create the site's success." For the Beast writers, "we now add the versatility of being able to develop ideas and investigations that require a different narrative pace suited to the medium of print," and for Newsweek, "The Daily Beast is a thriving frontline of breaking news and commentary that will raise the profile of the magazine's bylines and quicken the pace of a great magazine's revival," she said.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-12 17:31

PaidContent.org revealed that Amazon will soon be allowing all newspaper and magazine subscriptions bought for the Kindle to be accessed on any digital platform that runs Kindle apps.

According to paidContent.org, the new feature is scheduled to start within the next few weeks and will work on the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch, with Android apps planned for "down the road." For the time being, publications purchased on the Kindle can only be read using the device.

It makes sense for readers and for Amazon, says paidContent's Stacy Kramer, but does it makes sense for publishers, she asks? The new feature may not be the best idea for those already selling their own multi-platform subscriptions or who want to control their brands on other devices. The Wall Street Journal will not partake in the digital content exchange, and The New York Times has been less than forthright about its plans for being included, saying "We'll be announcing our bundle details when we launch the details of our paid model."

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-26 10:41

In the midst of News Corporation's shelving of its 'Project Alesia' due to over running costs, Rupert Murdoch showed support for the British government's rigorous spending cuts as well as defended independent professional journalism and free market economics, PressGazette.co.uk reports.

According to Press Gazette, Murdoch's speech comes in light of heavy opposition from the BBC and rival publications who fear that News Corp's possible control over the remaining 61 percent of BSkyB that it doesn't already own, will make the company "too big and powerful in the UK."

But Murdoch stressed that journalism needs to stay perseverant, independent and "hard-driving" in order to expand and cater to the new world of modern mass communication. He emphasized the idea that no matter how prominent digital media becomes, there will always be the need for credible sources and "a professional seeking to uncover facts no matter how uncomfortable."

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-25 17:11

According to a new Nielsen study, news takes the cake as the most popularly viewed type of content on the iPad, Poynter reports. The study, called "Internet Connected Devices," shows that news is the top content category, with 44 percent of iPad users viewing news regularly. Music comes in second, with 41 percent of users consuming on a regular basis.

But even with the boom of the iPad, the study found that more people still access news from their iPhones. Although iPhone news junkies fall two percent behind music consumers, 51 percent of users read the news on their phone.

Smartphones may be the most accessible and portable means of scoping out news, but PoynterOnline says that in this case, quantity is not necessarily quality. Seventy-eight percent of iPhone users spend less than 15 minutes per session reading the news, compared to iPad users, where more than half spend 16 minutes or more.

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-25 11:15

The new non-partisan hyperlocal PatersonPress.com site is up and running, Editor & Publisher revealed. According the site, it is dedicated to reporting on locally relevant civic affairs, government, educational system, and politics.

The site's editor Joe Malinconico said, "The Paterson Press will provide robust coverage of the Mayor, City Council, and School Board. It will also provide civic education content. This is not a blog, but a resource for residents to stay informed and engaged throughout Paterson."

In the midst of the launch, the Paterson Press is also aiming to hire professional locally-based freelance journalists, E&P writes. They won't be writing editorials though: the site will only report hard news. Content will consist of community sports, entertainment, arts, and non-profits, as well as business listings and a calendar of events.

The chairman for the Center of Civic Responsibility, Harry Pozycki says that the site "will give residents the knowledge they need to stay informed on current events in the city and will educate citizens on how to develop and advance constructive government solutions."

Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-10-22 16:34

Raju Narisetti, the managing editor of the Washington Post presented his vision of the sustainable model of multimedia newsrooms at the 17th World Editors Forum in Hamburg, Germany. He believes that the future of newsrooms is undoubtedly digital, and that newspapers should aggregate quality news from external sources and integrate this for their traditional readers.

"We should not be gatekeepers, but gateopeners," Narisetti said. "When people come to our site they expect a certain quality of content. So the content we aggregate has to be good," he added.

However, Narisetti noted that the idea of making news pure online is "a little bit false". He reminded the audience of the still huge circulations of the daily newspapers in the US. Speaking about new online media organisations, Narisetti claimed that "they give people what they want, sometimes even more". According to him, this can lead to irresponsibility of online journalists and bloggers that traditional journalism can't afford. Narisetti called it "the low cost of making mistakes." Nevertheless, he pointed out that the importance of the web-projects is in engaging readers.

Narisetti believes in paid online content. "We didn't give away content at the Wall Street Journal [he worked there for some years] and I don't think we should." He hopes to change the fact that the Post's website is free "sooner rather than later."

Author

Kirill Artemenko

Date

2010-10-07 13:59

TheMediaBriefing.com, a "new algorithm publishing model for the media industry," according to psmithjournalist.com, went live Tuesday. The site is part of a new digital media business, Briefing Media Ltd. Patrick Smith, the blog's author, is editor and chief analyst of the site with co-founders Rory Brown and Neil Thackray.

TheMediaBriefing is a "real-time intelligence platform for the media industry," that is constantly updated to bring together all the best news coverage and analysis from larger, well-known publications along with individual bloggers and thinkers, among others. All the content is hand-picked by the founders.

"Our system indexes the headline and a small part of each article, and we automatically link back to the original source at the start and end of each article," states the blog. The idea is to get readers the best coverage available, according to Smith.

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-29 17:06

While Google is still the #1 search engine in the U.S., Microsoft is now competing with Yahoo for the number two spot.

Accoring to Nielsen, Yahoo has recently been bumped from being the #2 search engine. Microsoft's Bing/MSN/Windows Live Internet sites "achieved market share of 13.9 percent, a rise of 2 percentage points compared to July and a leap of 30 percentage points compared to August 2009."

Both Yahoo and Microsoft combined now equal around 27 percent of all online searches and Google is still at the top with 65.1 percent, and 67.1 percent if Google's partner, AOL, is added into those numbers.
This, however, according to ClickZ, is a "bittersweet victory" for Microsoft, "since it has come largely at the expense of key partner Yahoo rather than market leader--and prime adversary--Google."

The question now is, what does this mean for newspapers? As Bing and family increase their market share, do newspapers have to specifically optimise their articles for Microsoft, as well as for Google and Yahoo?

Author

Heather Holm

Date

2010-09-16 17:28

Japan's newspapers, thus far healthier than their western counterparts, are now heading towards crisis, the Agence France-Presse reported. Although the country boasts the world's top selling daily, the Yomiuri Shimbun with 10 million copies a day, and newspapers remain the preferred source of news, advertising revenue has plunged and the press seems to have failed to capture the attention of much of the younger generation, according to the AFP.

Home-delivery subscriptions are strong and several updated editions of papers are produced throughout the day. But young people who have grown up with free news on the Internet might not be willing to pay: the AFP reported that according to the M1F1 Research Institute, people in their 20s view newspapers at expensive and time-consuming and replaceable by free alternatives.

Author

Emma Goodman's picture

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-09-16 12:46

Syndicate content

Editors Weblog

The World Editors Forum is the organization within the World Association of Newspapers devoted to newspaper editors worldwide. The Editors Weblog (www.editorsweblog.org), launched in January 2004, is a WEF initiative designed to facilitate the diffusion of information relevant to newspapers and their editors.


© 2013 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation