WAN-IFRA

A publication of the World Editors Forum

Date

Sun - 21.01.2018


Newsweek

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Journalists and news organisations love Twitter. The micro-blogging social network allows publishers and reporters to interact with readers and audiences, encouraging debate and discussion about articles and increase awareness of news brands. 

But every now and then Twitter reminds us that tweets and hashtags can take on a life of their own. When Newsweek attempted to use the handle #MuslimRage to generate public conversation around its coverage of the violence sparked in the Middle East by anti-Islam film The Innocence of Muslims, the embattled title soon found itself at the centre of a social media backlash.

Printed in conjunction with an equally controversial article by Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Newsweek’s current front cover shows two (assumedly) Muslim men apparently incandescent with anger, accompanied by a headline declaring ‘MUSLIM RAGE: How I survived it. How we can end it.” Within a matter of hours #MuslimRage was trending on Twitter and had become the subject of widespread mirth.

Author

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-18 18:18

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The first blow came on Monday, when the estate of the late billionaire Sidney Harman, which co-owns the Newsweek Daily Beast Co with IAC/Interactive Corp, officially announced that it would no longer be investing in the loss-making venture.

The second landed yesterday, when IAC’s Chairman Barry Diller let slip during a quarterly earnings call that “the transition to online from hard print will take place,” ostensibly giving this fall or sometime next year as the point by which the company would have come up with a plan to bury the 79-year-old weekly print magazine, transforming it into a web-only presence.

Naturally, this drove the Twittisphere into a frenzy, with some commentators more bereaved by the alleged news than others:

In the wake of Diller’s comments, Tina Brown, Editor in Chief of Newsweek and its digital bedfellow The Daily Beast, conducted damage control in the form of an email to all Newsweek Daily Beast Employees yesterday with the subject line “Scaremongering.” The email, obtained by Politico, begins: 

Author

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-26 17:59

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Have front covers lost their edge? As more and more news migrates online, it would be easy to think they might have.

When it comes to online news, not only is there no fixed “front cover” on most newspaper websites - which are updated throughout the day. The news that goes on a newspaper’s homepage is also not necessarily what pulls in the audience.

“Seventy-five percent of uniques are coming from external sources, only 25 percent are coming to the homepage,” said Google’s head of news products Richard Gingras, in a recent discussion about online journalism at the Paley Center’s international council of media executives, quoted by paidContent

Author

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-14 16:35

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It has been about two months since Tina Brown launched her redesign of Newsweek after the merger with the online news site The Daily Beast, where she served, and still does, as the editor-in-chief.

The two titles merged in a 50/50 joint venture, The Newsweek Daily Beast Company, owned by Barry Diller, who supports The Daily Beast through his media conglomerate IAC and former U.S. Congresswoman Jane Harman, who succeeded her husband, Sidney Harman, who bought Newsweek from the Washington Post in August 2010.

As from the March 14 issue, both the 77-year-old magazine and two-year old website have been under the aegis of Ms Brown.

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Author

Federica Cherubini

Date

2011-05-16 16:09

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According to The Guardian, Google and Twitter have launched a special service allowing people within Egypt to send Twitter messages "by leaving a voicemail on a specific number." This is in lieu of the Internet being cut off from within the country by Mubarak late on Monday. The service, a creation of the two internet companies, "uses Google's speech-to-text recognition service to automatically translate a message left on the number, which will be sent out on Twitter with the "#egypt" hashtag." For more about this topic, click here.

"Many news organizations have a love-hate relationship with the Internet," says PBS, adding that "while the abundance of free, online news has helped wreak havoc on the industry, the Internet itself has created incredible possibilities for news outlets to expand their reach and spark innovation." PBS continues to highlight how "crowdsourced journalism" is the current experiment for any serious news outlet, in terms of how "audiences can contribute to reporting and news in ways that would have been unimaginable a generation ago." But this is all dependent upon a free and open Internet. Read about the debate over net neutrality here.

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Author

Ashley Stepanek

Date

2011-02-01 19:00

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Former Newsweek editor Jon Meacham says he's "very enthusiastic about the future of Newsweek," Forbes reports.

This may come as a surprise to some, as reasons behind Meacham's August 2010 resignation as editor of Newsweek were met with scrutiny, with critics saying he was a "reluctant convert to the radical re-invention of Newsweek a year ago," and called it quits when Washington Post Co. sold the 77 year old weekly to Sidney Harmon.

But on the contrary, he thinks the recent merge between The Daily Beast and Newsweek, which will allow Newsweek to gain 5 million online readers, was the magazine's "best bet."

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Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-25 18:10

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As more news about the Daily Beast's merger with Newsweek emerges, more and more questions are springing up regarding the editoral changes that will be made to the publications now that the online news-aggregation site and 77-year-old award-winning weekly magazine have joined forces.

Following in the footsteps of other recent mergers like Bloomberg and BusinessWeek, Politico and its newspaper, the Daily Beast and Newsweek will hopefully complement each other and contribute what the other lacks. Though it is unclear how closely the two will work and how much cross-over of content there might be, Tina Brown, the now Editor-in-Chief of both publications said she thinks the merge "is a good model."

So what will the two publications get out of each other? The Guardian says Daily Beast will benefit from Newsweek's pre-established audience and print component which still attracts high advertising revenues. Newsweek, on the other hand, will gain a promising web market - five million unique visitors to be more exact.

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Author

Grace Donoso

Date

2010-11-15 19:25

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Newsweek and The Daily Beast website are to merge in a 50/50 joint venture, called the Newsweek Daily Beast Company, Daily Beast editor Tina Brown announced on her site late last night and the two organisations announced today. Brown will be editor-in-chief of both The Daily Beast, a website that curates aggregated news and produces original reporting and opion and Newsweek, a print weekly.

Brown described the merger between the 77-year-old magazine and two-year old website as "a wonderful new opportunity for all the brilliant editors and writers at The Daily Beast who have worked so hard to create the site's success." For the Beast writers, "we now add the versatility of being able to develop ideas and investigations that require a different narrative pace suited to the medium of print," and for Newsweek, "The Daily Beast is a thriving frontline of breaking news and commentary that will raise the profile of the magazine's bylines and quicken the pace of a great magazine's revival," she said.

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Author

Emma Goodman

Date

2010-11-12 17:31

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Newsweek has recently announced a reformatted version of its website. Stating in its introduction, Newsweek hopes that the site will be defined by two words: simple and clear. Rather than subscribing to a trend of news reporting that is "cluttered with headlines and knee-jerk reactions," Newsweek hopes to establish a site that cuts directly to the heart of the matter by focusing on one story that will lead the site and providing a stream of other, more minor, stories below. Overall, this redesign appears to be Newsweek's attempt to differentiate itself from other news sources by focusing on quality news and sacrificing some element of quantity.

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Author

Carole Wurzelbacher

Date

2010-05-28 16:52

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